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Travels In The Interior Of Africa - Volume 1 download ebook

by Mungo Park

Travels In The Interior Of Africa - Volume 1 download ebook
ISBN:
1419190881
ISBN13:
978-1419190889
Author:
Mungo Park
Publisher:
Kessinger Publishing, LLC (June 17, 2004)
Language:
Pages:
104 pages
ePUB:
1636 kb
Fb2:
1778 kb
Other formats:
doc lrf docx lrf
Category:
Africa
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.6

Travels into the Interior of Africa.

Travels into the Interior of Africa. Travels in the Interior of Africa - Volume 02. Read.

Start by marking Travels in the Interior of Africa, Volume 1 as Want to Read . Mungo Park (1771 – 1806) was a Scottish explorer of the African continent. He was the first Westerner known to have traveled to the central portion of the Niger River.

Start by marking Travels in the Interior of Africa, Volume 1 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This (meaning the entire 2 volume work) is a very affecting story

His hardships were so great that many of the slaves he came across felt sorry for him. One (free) woman and her daughters took pity on him and sang a song about how he had no wife and no mother to look after him. This (meaning the entire 2 volume work) is a very affecting story. It is hard to place oneself in the world of two centuries ago, and Mungo Park's description of his hardships and travels does just that.

Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader. 1, 10. Books by same authors: Travels in the Interior of Africa - volume 02. 10, 10. The Travels of Mungo Park. 9, 10. Life And Travels of Mungo Park in Central Africa.

Park eventually returned to Scotland by way of Antigua on 22 December 1797. He had been thought dead, and his return home with news of the discovery of the Niger River evoked great public enthusiasm.

Mungo Park was born in Selkirkshire, Scotland, at Foulshiels on the Yarrow Water, near Selkirk, on a tenant farm which his father rented from the Duke of Buccleuch. He was the seventh in a family of thirteen. Although tenant farmers, the Parks were relatively well-off

Mungo Park was born in Selkirkshire, Scotland, at Foulshiels on the Yarrow Water, near Selkirk, on a tenant farm which his father rented from the Duke of Buccleuch. Although tenant farmers, the Parks were relatively well-off. They were able to pay for Park to receive a good education, and Park's father died leaving property valued at £3,000 (UK£210,000 in 2014). The Parks were Dissenters, and Mungo Park was brought up in the Calvinist tradition. He was educated at home before attending Selkirk grammar school

Negro curiosity; a message from the king.

Negro curiosity; a message from the king. By Mungo Park. Life and Travels of Mungo Park.

LibriVox recording of Travels in the Interior of Africa by Mungo Park. Read in English by Lynda Marie Neilson. Mungo Park, a Scottish surgeon and explorer, was sent out by the 'Association for Promoting the Discovery of the Interior of Africa' after Major Houghton failed to return, to discover the if the River Niger was a tributary of either the river Senegal or Gambia in South Africa. This is the story of his first trip. Most of the trip he had nothing but his tattered clothes, a horse, a pocket.

This ebook presents Travels in the Interior of Africa Volume I, from Mungo Park Table of Contents -01- About this book -02- INTRODUCTION -03- VOLUME I. TRAVELS IN TH. .

This ebook presents Travels in the Interior of Africa Volume I, from Mungo Park. A dynamic table of contents enables to jump directly to the chapter selected. Table of Contents -01- About this book -02- INTRODUCTION -03- VOLUME I. TRAVELS IN THE INTERIOR OF AFRICA -04- FOOTNOTES.

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.
Reviews:
  • Fast Lovebird
I don't write reviews often but I had to respond to the comments of "Raspberry", who reviewed this book. Contrary to what the reviewer said, there are no dull lists. what you will find are descriptions of people, ways of living, and cultures that, up until that time, had never been encountered before by Europeans. Born in 1771, Mungo Park was a doctor, shipboard surgeon and by the age of 24, an African explorer. He spent two and a half years in Africa on his first trip, ending in 1797. in 1805 he embarked on a second trip to try to find the source of the Niger river, dying during the journey. this book concerns his first expedition.

It is a fascinating document which describes his journey, encounters with various local people, their customs, etc.

This is not a fast paced 'thriller' or modern travel book. It was written for a late eighteenth century audience who were less familiar with Africa than we are with Mars. He often gives descriptions of plants and animals which, while we may be familiar with them today, were strange to his audience.
  • Mr.Bean
A very well written first-person account of Mungo Park's visit to Africa in the late 1700s. This book should be required reading for all high school graduates, since reading it would clear up many false notions connected with African/American slavery. Although Mr. Parks was anti-slavery, he plainly states that 75% of Africans were slaves to the other 25%, and that the buying and selling of slaves among Africans and the selling of slaves to Europeans were as common and natural as life itself.
  • Tejora
This book, and the second volume, comprise one of the most incredible true tales of adventure you will ever read. Mungo Park was not only a keen observer of people, their character and customs, he also had a keen eye for the lands he traveled through. This is a tremendously well written personal narrative of one man's journey through deepest, darkest Africa to places no white man had ever been before.

Mungo Park's story of his first journey to Africa, told in his own words, comprises one of the most compelling tales of adventure I have ever read. That he survived this journey at all may be the most sensational aspect of this record of his travels. It would be wonderful to be able to read the narrative of his second journey into Africa, unfortunately, he was killed on that trip and his journal was never recovered.

Wikipedia has a very nice article on him.
  • Dead Samurai
Amazing first hand account of travel in the latter part of the 18th century. Anyone who has been to West Africa or planning to go or move there should read this book. I didn't find it tedious. I found it enlightening as to the history and culture (which, in many ways, hasn't changed). A valuable book if one is interested in Mali at all.
  • Manesenci
As the first of the great African Explorers, Mungo Park certainly had a great role in opening up Africa to European exploration (and yes, exploitation). His narrative of his adventures in Western Africa searching for the source of the Niger river is full of excitement, intrigue, narrow escapes and adventure. Highly recommended to anyone interested in true adventure stories!!!
  • Malalrajas
I liked this book quite a lot. I bought it after reading Travels Volume One. Mungo Park showed a lot of compassion and understanding of the various tribes he encountered in Africa. I found the culture and traditions of the people very interesting.
  • Bladebringer
Mungo Park was a very nice person who foolishly decided to search for Timbuctu at the end of the 18th century. His hardships were so great that many of the slaves he came across felt sorry for him. One (free) woman and her daughters took pity on him and sang a song about how he had no wife and no mother to look after him. This (meaning the entire 2 volume work) is a very affecting story. It is hard to place oneself in the world of two centuries ago, and Mungo Park's description of his hardships and travels does just that. Well worth reading.
Mungo Park was one of those few explorers who did not emphasize on the "white man superiority" which was highly prevalent with the explorers of his time.His travels were very human and extreamely descriptive in nature.The writer writes in a very lucid and convenient style which literally transports the reader to the Africa of those times.The sufferings,the hardships and frequent robberies faced by Mungo Park speaks volumes about the determination of the explorer as he continues single handedly to unravel the "dark continent".The inherant nature of the various tribal groups and the inter tribal and religious undercurrants have been beautifully captured by the author.

This is one of the best Travelogues that I have ever read after a long time.