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The Sledding Hill download ebook

by Chris Crutcher

The Sledding Hill download ebook
ISBN:
0060502444
ISBN13:
978-0060502447
Author:
Chris Crutcher
Publisher:
Greenwillow Books; Presumed to be 1st as edition is unstated edition (May 10, 2005)
Language:
ePUB:
1768 kb
Fb2:
1428 kb
Other formats:
txt rtf mobi docx
Category:
Literature & Fiction
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.6

In memory of zach clifton, Who spoke whale talk. You immediately understand. what the Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff book was about

In memory of zach clifton, Who spoke whale talk. what the Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff book was about. I could take right off, but once I see my friend struggling so hard to get my abandoned body out from under all that weight, then fleeing to the hot springs, curiosity and my sense of connection to him draws me to stay.

Chris Crutcher, The Sledding Hill. Thank you for reading books on BookFrom.

I began this book thinking Crutcher had finally lost it, writing about a dead person who hangs around to help out his grieving friend, but then Crutcher threw a curve and I discovered the book is about censorship.

Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). I began this book thinking Crutcher had finally lost it, writing about a dead person who hangs around to help out his grieving friend, but then Crutcher threw a curve and I discovered the book is about censorship. Chris Crutcher is a hero to adults who believe that the only way to edify our childeren is allow them to be free-thinking beings who can make their own determination of what is "good" or "bad" in literature or in life.

The Sledding Hill is a 2005 post-modern metafictional novel by young adult writer Chris Crutcher. By having the novel narrated by a super-omniscient dead boy and placing himself into the novel, Crutcher has written a work that encompasses two literary fads. The novel is narrated by the late Billy Bartholomew, the best friend of the protagonist, Eddie Proffit. Eddie is an intelligent boy who is seemingly afflicted with ADHD

The Sledding Hill book. Eddie hasn't had an easy yearFirst his father dies.

The Sledding Hill book. Details (if other): Cancel.

I appreciate your allowing me to be here tonight and giving me this time. Mr. Crutcher is not on our list of speakers. Crutcher is not on our list of speakers ugh time to make a decision, and he clearly has an agenda. He drove a hundred miles; you want him to see us as inhospitable? He doesn’t have any more of an agenda than you d. .It’s Robert McMaster, a logger who has been silent all evening. His words meet with general agreement

Chris Crutcher has written nine critically acclaimed novels, an autobiography, and two collections of short stories.

Chris Crutcher has written nine critically acclaimed novels, an autobiography, and two collections of short stories. He has won three lifetime achievement awards for the body of his work: the Margaret A. Edwards Award, the ALAN Award, and the NCTE National Intellectual Freedom Award. Chris Crutcher lives in Spokane, Washington.

These days, Billy and Eddie meet on the sledding hill, where they used to spend countless hours - until Billy kicked a stack of Sheetrock over on himself, breaking his neck and effectively hitting tilt on his Earthgame. The two were inseparable friends. They still are. And Billy is not about to let a little thing like death stop him from hanging in there with Eddie in his epic struggle to get his life back on track. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Death - Fiction, Future life - Fiction, Censorship - Fiction, Elective mutism - Fiction, High schools - Fiction, Schools - Fiction, Idaho - Fiction. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on June 12, 2013.

Billy Bartholomew has an audacious soul, and he knows it. Why? Because it's all he has left. He's dead.

Eddie Proffit has an equally audacious soul, but he doesn't know it. He's still alive.

These days, Billy and Eddie meet on the sledding hill, where they used to spend countless hours -- until Billy kicked a stack of Sheetrock over on himself, breaking his neck and effectively hitting tilt on his Earthgame. The two were inseparable friends. They still are. And Billy is not about to let a little thing like death stop him from hanging in there with Eddie in his epic struggle to get his life back on track.

Reviews:
  • Zolorn
This is the first Crutcher book where I haven't been sad at the arrival of the last page. Crutcher came off looking immature in his one-dimensional criticism of the fundamentalist preacher. He made a lame attempt at giving the antagonist some depth far too late in the story. It's like he believes all narrow-minded preachers are harsh because they were abused as children (read his other books and you'll see what I mean). Nevertheless, his insight into the struggles of young adults is on the mark and quite refreshing. I would still recommend every book I've read from this author, even if I don't think he's fair with some of his characterizations. You'll find REAL topics in his writing that are not covered in most teen novels. All the struggles teens (and most adults) hide are vividly brought into the light throughout his narratives. Lost souls will find hope in his books.
  • Gajurus
I began this book thinking Crutcher had finally lost it, writing about a dead person who hangs around to help out his grieving friend, but then Crutcher threw a curve and I discovered the book is about censorship.

Chris Crutcher is a hero to adults who believe that the only way to edify our childeren is allow them to be free-thinking beings who can make their own determination of what is "good" or "bad" in literature or in life. The important thing is that our kids read, and if that means they have to read books like Crutcher's where if you count bad words and taboo plot topics, you will be worn out after the first chapter, then, so be it.

Crutcher makes lots of good points in this novel, and I will respect the review readers out there enough to let you read the book to see what I mean.

My only disappointment is that Crutcher didn't give me some publicity on page 226 when listing authors who were banned from a library in the novel. No respect. Story of my life.

I recommend this book for teens who have been a part of some of the censorship battles that have been going on all over our nation, especially the last 4-5 years. I also recommend this book to teens who have no adult in their life who gives them the respect that a young adult deserves.

I recommend this book for adults who fight for the rights of our teens to read what they like to read.

DISCLAIMER:

This book is not for everyone. There is no profanity in this book. There are, however, subtle plot references from the fictional fictional book Warren Peece that mention taboo issues which are not appropriate in the minds of those who believe solving problems can only be done by telling our youth what is righteous and moral, and never discussing any other viewpoints, or never allowing our kids to take what they have been taught at home and in life, read the offending literature, and make their own determinations based on their own rational, well thought out thoughts.
  • Gold as Heart
"I can bump him, and I will, because the one thing that is as true out here as it is in the Earthgame is connection. Connection is love. Staying connected with Eddie Proffit is as good for me as it is for him, because love is as true on earth as it is in the farthest reaches of the universe.

"So I do it."

"Just Do It." --Nike slogan

In KING OF THE MILD FRONTIER: AN ILL-ADVISED AUTOBIOGRAPHY, Chris Crutcher recognizes Michael Jordan as a hero--not for his legendary on-court accomplishments, but for the manner in which Michael responded to the brutal murder of his father. Chris notes of Michael:

"When asked about his feelings for his father's killers or what should happen to them, in the only recount I ever heard, all he said was, 'My father is dead. That's all I care about.'"

In rereading Crutcher's autobiography I continue to be moved by Michael's response. I'm so touched by it that one day I'm going to make a point of giving Michael a big long hug.

It actually won't be "one day" since, according to Billy Bartholomew, there is no "time" where he now exists. Billy is the dead teenaged narrator of Chris Crutcher?s new novel THE SLEDDING HILL. And according to Billy Bartholomew, once me 'n Number 23 are both history I'll be able to hook up with Michael or anyone else who has come and "gone."

Life on Earth, as Billy explains it from his beyond-this-world perspective, is but a game, the Earthgame. Once you get to where he is, you "travel at the speed of imagination" and "laugh in wonder at all the crazy considerations you had while playing the Earthgame because you were so focused you thought things were important."

Nor are there emotions after death, Billy explains, other than a "pure joy of knowledge--and a sense of coming home."

What to many readers will be Billy's most shocking revelation from beyond the grave is that everyone who dies ends up IN THE SAME PLACE! That means me and James Dobson, Tucker Carlson, and Bull Conner are all going to get to spend eternity sharing the same celestial real estate with (formerly) practicing homosexuals and hippies, independent film makers, blasphemers, Bin Ladens, black people, and banned book authors.

Chris Crutcher is a runner, as are so many of the characters he's created over the years. Crutcher's been spending a lot of his time lately running around the country defending his good name and his great books which are being challenged so frequently that you've got to figure there?s some serious hit list out there making its way to right-wing pulpits around the country.

Of course, there's supposed to be a separation of Church and State, at least in theory. That wasn't the reality when it came to Crutcher's own childhood experiences--as he recounted in KING OF THE MILD FRONTIER--and it sure doesn't seem to be the case today if you?ve paid attention to as many recent articles about book bannings as I have.

Many of the childhood stories of religion and death that Crutcher includes in his autobiography find their way into the plot of THE SLEDDING HILL. And if you've read the autobiography you realize there are going to be a bunch of huffing, puffing, scowling preachers when they start getting an earful of Billy Bartholomew.

But they're going to have a bit of a problem deep-sixing this baby. Crutcher?s written a book without ANY "naughty" words. Not a single f-word, sh-word, n-word, b-word, or a-h word. If they want to ban THE SLEDDING HILL from school libraries, they're going to have to get it banned because of Billy Bartholomew?s blatantly blasphemous revelations.

And that's the catch, because in Board of Education, Island Trees Union Free School District No.26 v. Pico, the landmark 1982 Supreme Court case concerning school-library censorship (I quote from Russell Freedman's IN DEFENSE OF LIBERTY: THE STORY OF AMERICA'S BILL OF RIGHTS.),

"[T]he court held that students' rights were violated by removal of the books and said that a school library provides 'an environment especially appropriate for the recognition of First Amendment rights of students.' "School officials have a great deal of power to decide which books should be in their school libraries, but they ?may not remove books from school library shelves simply because they dislike the ideas contained in those books,' said the Court. 'Allowing a school board to engage in such conduct hardly teaches children to respect the diversity of ideas that is fundamental to the American system.' "

Now along with the recent book banning news stories, there have been some pretty articulate words from certain teens who feel the same way about having their school libraries raped by the Religious Right as I felt about the Nixon White House invading the offices of the antiwar group I belonged to when I was their age.

As recently explained so articulately in the Kansas City Star by a Kansas high school student named Sasha Mushegian,

"It's true that some words and ideas should not be introduced to students who have not reached a certain level of maturity. But the amount of sheltering these parents are trying to accomplish is more appropriate for elementary school children than for people capable of earning wages, taking college-level courses and driving cars. These are all actions that require a degree of personal responsibility and capability of rational thought that these parents seem to think we lack.

"Yes, we're not completely mature yet; sure, we often make bad decisions--but maturation is a process. There's no magical age at which we mentally and emotionally become adults.

"How can you expect children to mature if you don't expose them to books in which reality is messy and confusing, morals are not immediately clear, making the right decision requires analysis of subtleties, and characters make the wrong choices? How do you expect students to think for themselves if you never expose them to situations that are challenging and unfamiliar (yet still safely contained within the pages of a great work of literature)?"

I can easily see all this leading us toward another Supreme Court showdown to determine whether in reality we're a theocracy or a democracy.

Then on the other hand, I can just imagine some overly-pierced, black-attired, parentally-oppressed young person reading all of this discussion, rolling his or her eyes, and impatiently wanting to know the important stuff:

"Come on, Richie! Who the f--- cares what those right-wing a----s are b----ing about now? Just tell us whether the new Crutcher book is worth a sh--!"

Okay, well, as a matter of fact it is. THE SLEDDING HILL caused me to laugh a lot, cry a little, and exercise some brain cells.

"Everyone thought our friendship was odd; what was a smart kid like me doing hanging out with a kid with an IQ short of triple digits? Truth is, Eddie's IQ turned out to be off the charts. His mind bounces from one thing to the other pretty much however it wants, though, and long before he should be finishing up one thought, he's on to something else. Eddie doesn't come to very many conclusions."

Longtime friends Eddie Proffit and Billy Bartholomew like to run. It's the one thing that can keep Eddie's mind focused. But then--in a rather short period of time--Eddie discovers both his dad and his best friend Billy dead from totally random accidents. And things go downhill from there when Eddie's nemesis, the Reverend Tartar, starts hanging out with Eddie's grieving mom.

Fortunately, Eddie discovers something that begins to help him get his mind around what has happened in his life. No, it's not a controlled substance--it's a book.

And, unfortunately, you can guess what the Rev. and his followers from the Red Brick Church want to do to that book.

Enough said. I recommend taking it for a spin. (But remember to turn INTO the slide.)
  • Lynnak
School use
  • Grinin
Good book
  • Hurus
She read about two chapters and did not like the language or content. She did not like it at all.
  • Enila
love it Bought this book for my daughter. I think she likes it. Is mandatory book for class and she used it