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A.L.I.E.E.E.N.: Archives of Lost Issues and Earthly Editions of Extraterrestrial Novelties download ebook

by Lewis Trondheim

A.L.I.E.E.E.N.: Archives of Lost Issues and Earthly Editions of Extraterrestrial Novelties download ebook
ISBN:
1596430958
ISBN13:
978-1596430952
Author:
Lewis Trondheim
Publisher:
First Second; 1st edition (May 2, 2006)
Language:
Pages:
96 pages
ePUB:
1779 kb
Fb2:
1259 kb
Other formats:
mobi lit txt azw
Category:
Literature & Fiction
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.9

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking . is a nominee for the 2007 Eisner Awards for Best .

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Inventive, innovative and prolific graphic artist Lewis Trondheim tells an entire story without a single word, (at least that I could read since I am not from outerspace). No parent will have to read this to a child but could lead some lively "what do you think they are doing?" conversations. The brightly colored, cheery round aliens are actively doing all kinds of weird things that children will love.

Lewis Trondheim (born Laurent Chabosy, French:, on 11 December 1964), is a French cartoonist and one of the founders (in 1990) of the independent publisher L'Association

Lewis Trondheim (born Laurent Chabosy, French:, on 11 December 1964), is a French cartoonist and one of the founders (in 1990) of the independent publisher L'Association. Both his silent comic La Mouche and Kaput and Zösky have been made into animated cartoons. He explained his choice of pseudonym after the Norwegian city of Trondheim as follows: "As a last name I wanted to use a city's name, but Lewis Bordeaux or Lewis Toulouse didn't sound so good.

October 2, 2019 History. N found in the catalog. Are you sure you want to remove . Published 2006 by First Second in New York.

Trondheim fills the stories with "alien" dialogue, which naturally can be read without the help of any words, filled as they are with Trondheim's trademark silent comedy. Creatures stroll through psychedelic landscapes and have adventures in miniature

As a Trondheim fan, I picked this up on a whim at Strand, and read it with my friend in the subway going back . This purports to be an alien comic book, found by chance and reproduced for earthlings to read (singe marks on the page edges and all).

As a Trondheim fan, I picked this up on a whim at Strand, and read it with my friend in the subway going back home. It is hilarious, disgusting, cute, and sad all at the same time. The creatures are well-imagined. There is dialogue, but of course it's in alien - but nevertheless it's generally possible to work out what's going on.

book by Lewis Trondheim.

First Second, 2006 Series.

Beaten up, tattered, and weather worn, this volume has crossed through space to become the first extra-terrestrial comic book in print on earth. The language and even the alphabet are alien, but as human readers will soon discover, the themes and stories are universal. These interwoven stories and vignettes start out quite simply, but a darker, more complex side is gradually revealed as alien characters act out very human problems, from peer pressure to intolerance to the challenges of friendship. Beneath its apparently childlike and cartoony style, A.L.I.E.E.E.N. explores human nature, cruelty, and kindness with surprising depth and loads of humor. A.L.I.E.E.E.N. is a nominee for the 2007 Eisner Awards for Best U.S. Edition of International Material and Best Writer/Artist - Humor.
Reviews:
  • Walan
what the heck was that about? lewis! i love you...but that was terrible! dangit. i was really looking forward to this.

in my opinion the problem is it was too messed up for kids and too stupid for some adults. the visuals were nice but not enough to carry it. it was depressing, filled with murder, torture (peeling the skin of the face of an innocent alien, wearing the skin of another) and tons of defecation, litteraly, rivers of it. ah... no. i'm good thanks. just gross. stupid. again and again it turns up and man nothing was funny for me. there's no words so it's a quick read 5-10 minutes. explains why it was a bargain price of 5.50 and i guess i got the last one because doesn't look like it's available anymore. baaaaad.

recommended: harum scarum, the hoodoodad, ralph azham books. early dungeon,

lewis whyyyyyyy?
  • Jieylau
:01 Books markets this particular comic/graphic novel as being for kids. Well....maybe not? It's written in what's supposed to be an alien language and is actually pretty gory. If you work with anyone under 12, maybe this book isn't for them? That being said, the lack of an actual language makes this book a great tool for teaching story development and dialogue skills--students can use it to create a story since it's impossible to know for sure what's actually going on.
  • Ceroelyu
The only issue I have with this is that it is too short. It is both creepy and poignant, dark and silly. For a blood-stained comic book filled with gibberish dialogue, there are some very interesting underlying themes. This one strikes me as particularly relevant/relatable: a monster assimilates into a new group by wearing one of their skins. I can't really say enough about this graphic novel; it should be sliced open and framed in a contemporary art museum.
  • ᴜɴɪᴄᴏʀɴ
love it. I already own one, but bought this one for gift
  • Jack
I LOVE this book and its quirky story line. I found a copy of it on my cousin's bookshelf while I was visiting her this summer in France. Her copy was hardbound with excellent subtle coloring printing.
The book I received from Amazon (the English version) was a huge disappointment. The colors are very harsh and the printing is awful in comparison to the original French version.
I'll be returning my copy to Amazon and be tracking down a French version.
  • Painbrand
I think the title says it all. Great comic, arrived on time, in good nick - cheers!
  • Ƀ⁞₳⁞Ð Ƀ⁞Ǿ⁞Ɏ
"A.L.I.E.E.E.N.: Archives of Lost Issues and Earthly Editions of Extraterrestrial Novelties"
Written and illustrated by Louis Trondheim
(First Second Books, 2006)
---------------------------------------------------------
Wow, what a creepy, clever book. This quick, wordless graphic novel poses as a genial hoax -- the author claims it is a comic book from outer space that he found while backpacking in the hills. If it is from outer space, the culture it comes from is quite sinister and remorselessly violent. The art style is cutesy and cartoonish, sort of like Pokemon placed in a George Herriman landscape, but the story is nothing short of horrific: one minute characters are skipping playfully in the forest, the next second one winds up impaled on a thorny tree, its eyes gouged out and bloody. The creature's friend, a cute Tweety Bird-like character, leads its blinded companion to a doctor (a multi-eyeballed worm) but the doctor proceeds to violate the hapless patient in a variety of ways (and is later seen hideously torturing another "patient") In the following chapters we are brought into a dark, frightening world where smaller creatures are mercilessly pursued, tricked and killed by larger creatures, cartoon brutes who are quite cheerful about their "games." Several of the more innocent-looking critters dodge their aggressors in a variety of ways, and their lives briefly intersect until finally the saga comes to a grimy, disgusting, apocalyptic end.

Sounds awful, I know, but even though the content is disturbing, the book itself is both entertaining and intellectually provocative. On a surface level, the story of a violent culture finally swept away by its own sewage is an apt metaphor for our own world, minus the cute animals and the eyeball monsters. This is a book that is certainly worth reading, and which may haunt you for a while after you're done with it... It is not, however, recommended for very young readers. This is the stuff of screaming and nightmares. (Joe Sixpack, ReadThatAgain book reviews)
content seems appropriate for middle reader and young adult plus parents and grandparents)

The very first comic strip for extraterrestrial children ever discovered on our planet--and so....

Inventive, innovative and prolific graphic artist Lewis Trondheim tells an entire story without a single word, (at least that I could read since I am not from outerspace).

A.L.I.E.E.E.N. stands for Archives of Lost Issues and Earthly Editions of Extraterrestrial Novelties.

No parent will have to read this to a child but could lead some lively "what do you think they are doing?" conversations. The brightly colored, cheery round aliens are actively doing all kinds of weird things that children will love.

The wordless story will stretch every parent's comfort--but that isn't all bad.

The little aliens are drawn with so much expression, both with their faces and hands--and with a little effort and close attention, you can soon understand the story.

Armchair Interviews says: Colorful, inventive and every-active "alien" children go about their daily lives--and we get to watch with great fun.