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Wormwood download ebook

by G. P. Taylor

Wormwood download ebook
ISBN:
0399242570
ISBN13:
978-0399242571
Author:
G. P. Taylor
Publisher:
G.P. Putnam's Sons Books for Young Readers (September 9, 2004)
Language:
Pages:
272 pages
ePUB:
1598 kb
Fb2:
1303 kb
Other formats:
mbr txt rtf docx
Category:
Literature & Fiction
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.6

In 1756 London, Agetta Lamian fears the end of the world is near  . Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

Wormwood G. P. Taylor To JC it was the only book to be trusted. To JC & KST you have beaten back the Black Dog and filled my life with your light. To touch the Nemorensis was to hold the secrets of the cosmos in your hands. From the top-floor window of his large four-storey house on Bloomsbury Square Dr Sabian Blake could see the farthest depths of space. He stared out into the night sky through the thick lens of his long brass telescope.

Wormwood is a fantasy sequel to Graham Taylor's Shadowmancer. It follows the adventures of the book's two main protagonists, Dr. Sabian Blake and his servant girl, Agetta Lamian. The work is a Christian allegory. The work, like its predecessor, was criticised for attacking other religions. Taylor professed that this work was against the kabbalah, which he sees as a practice that leads to Satan. The work, like its predecessor, was criticed for attacking other religions.

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An epic adventure from a master storyteller. Panic fills the streets of London on a night in 1756 when the earth suddenly lurches forward and starts spinning out of control. Within moments, eleven days and nights flash through the sky, finally leaving the city in total darkness. Is the end of the world at hand? Agetta Lamian fears so. She's the young housemaid of Dr. Sabian Blake, a scientist who has recently acquired the Nemorensis, the legendary book said to unlock the secrets of the universe

Maria Mundi and the Ship of Fools is the incredible final book in G. Taylor's Mariah Mundi trilogy

In his Bloomsbury attic sits Dr Sabian Blake - astronomer, scientist, and master of the Cabala. Dr Blake is in possession of the Nemorensis, an ancient leather-bound book that holds the secrets of the universe. Scribbled into one of its margins is a mysterious prophecy, and deciphering it could prove the key to saving London from a catastrophic fate. But there are others interested in the Nemorensis too, for more sinister reasons. Maria Mundi and the Ship of Fools is the incredible final book in G. Taylor's Mariah Mundi trilogy. They haven't found the bomb - the ship will explode in twenty hours.

An epic adventure from a master storyteller

As 1756 London is engulfed in total darkness, Agetta Lamian, a young housemaid for scientist Dr. Sabian Blake, discovers that her employer has recently acquired the Nemorensis, a legendary book that holds the key to unlocking the secrets of the universe and that warns of a potential apocalypse as a comet called Wormwood threatens to collide with London.

taylor - wormwood - 1ST us h/b. Condition: Very Good. SHADOWMANCER by TAYLOR G P Paperback Book The Cheap Fast Free Post. YOUR MARRIAGE God's Policy Standard by Taylor 9781977207241 Brand New. £1. 9.

As 1756 London is engulfed in total darkness, Agetta Lamian, a young housemaid for scientist Dr. Sabian Blake, discovers that her employer has recently acquired the Nemorensis, a legendary book that holds the key to unlocking the secrets of the universe and that warns of a potential apocalypse as a comet called Wormwood threatens to collide with London. 150,000 first printing.
Reviews:
  • Brialelis
This turned out to be something that I have really enjoyed and know others would like it just as I have.
I would recommend this to anyone that likes Christian Suspense/Mystery/Fantasy books. I wouldn't pass this up. I'll be reading this again in the future.
  • Kulwes
G.P. Taylor struck out with his much-hyped debut, the tepid religious fantasy "Shadowmancer." And the follow-up, "Wormwood," is even less engaging than "Shadowmancer" was -- while it's fairly well written, it's loosely strung together with dull characters and a plodding plot.

In the mid 1700s, London is gripped by panic -- somehow the earth is overspinning, and then it stops so that London is plunged into permanent night. A young servant girl, Agetta, is terrified of what is going to happen, especially because her master, Kabbalah master and scientist Dr Sabian Blake, is predicting that a comet called Wormwood will strike the earth.

This information comes from the mysterious book, Nemorensis, that Blake was given by a stranger. The Nemorensis supposedly contains all the secrets of the universe. Unfortunately, the book also exerts a sinister influence over Agetta. But in an attic is Tegatus, an angelic being who might just be the savior London needs...

Religious fantasy, or fantasy with religious undertones, is not a bad thing -- J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis and others allowed their religions to influence their life's work. But G.P. Taylor not only has the subtlety of a battering ram -- he's also quite boring. The story plods along in a string of little plot-related scenes, without building up much momentum.

One of the biggest problems is the way Taylor handles the fantastical elements of his book. Okay, there are weird creatures. Most fantasy books have those. But his seem to just be thrown into the mix for no apparent reason. His handling of superstition and science in the 1700s is sketchy at best, no matter how brilliant a scientist Blake is meant to be.

Taylor has a decent enough writing style, and he has a certain flair for description and atmosphere. But his style is also very repetitive and over-the-top -- where are the editors when you need them? What's worse, his idea of creating a fantasy world seems to be to just toss in a few weird elements that have nothing to do with the plot. The actual fantasy plot is just more of Taylor's lukewarm, generic Christian sentiments, and some truly bizarre theology. Can angels drown?

The characters are as thin as the pages. There are a lot of characters for a relatively slim fantasy book, and many of them are left underdeveloped. Blake and Agetta are the only ones who receive any character development, and that isn't saying much. Agetta in particular seems almost manic, considering how fast her moods swing. Tegatus the depressed angel is just freakin' boring.

G.P. Taylor strikes out again with "Wormwood," another dull religious fantasy that leaves a sour taste in the mouth. Boring, messy, and not worth the effort it takes to wade through.
  • Skillet
G.P. Taylor struck out with his much-hyped debut, the tepid religious fantasy "Shadowmancer." And the follow-up, "Wormwood," is even less engaging than "Shadowmancer" was -- while it's fairly well written, it's loosely strung together with dull characters and a plodding plot.

In the mid 1700s, London is gripped by panic -- somehow the earth is overspinning, and suddenly stops so that London is plunged into permanent night. A young servant girl, Agetta, is terrified of what is going to happen, especially because her master, Kabbalah master and scientist Dr Sabian Blake, is predicting that a comet called Wormwood will strike the earth.

This information comes from the mysterious book, Nemorensis, that Blake was given by a stranger. The Nemorensis supposedly contains all the secrets of the universe. Unfortunately, the book also exerts a sinister influence over Agetta. But in an attic is Tegatus, an angelic being who might just be the savior London needs...

Religious fantasy, or fantasy with religious undertones, is not a bad thing -- J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis and others allowed their religions to influence their life's work. But G.P. Taylor not only has the subtlety of a battering ram -- he's also quite boring. The story plods along in a string of little plot-related scenes, without building up much momentum.

One of the biggest problems is the way Taylor handles the fantastical elements of his book. Okay, there are weird creatures. Most fantasy books have those. But his seem to just be thrown into the mix for no apparent reason. His handling of superstition and science in the 1700s is sketchy at best, no matter how brilliant a scientist Blake is meant to be.

Taylor has a decent enough writing style, and he has a certain flair for description and atmosphere. But his style is also very repetitive and over-the-top -- where are the editors when you need them? What's worse, his idea of creating a fantasy world seems to be to just toss in a few weird elements that have nothing to do with the plot. The actual fantasy plot is just more of Taylor's lukewarm, generic Christian sentiments.

The characters are as thin as the pages. There are a lot of characters for a relatively slim fantasy book, and many of them are left underdeveloped. Blake and Agetta are the only ones who receive any character development, and that isn't saying much. Agetta in particular seems almost manic, considering how fast her moods swing. Tegatus is just freakin' boring.

G.P. Taylor strikes out again with "Wormwood," another dull religious fantasy that leaves a sour taste in the mouth. Boring, messy, and not worth the effort it takes to wade through.
  • Vushura
I am collecting G.P. Taylor's books. My fourth grade friend and my 58 year old self both like to read his books.