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Algebra 1: Concepts and Skills California Teacher's Edition download ebook

by MCDOUGAL LITTEL

Algebra 1: Concepts and Skills California Teacher's Edition download ebook
ISBN:
0618077286
ISBN13:
978-0618077281
Author:
MCDOUGAL LITTEL
Publisher:
MCDOUGAL LITTEL; Teachers Guide edition (January 1, 2001)
Language:
Pages:
1032 pages
ePUB:
1887 kb
Fb2:
1279 kb
Other formats:
docx lit azw mbr
Category:
Education & Reference
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.6

Gifts & Registry.

Series: Algebra 1: Concepts & Skills. Hardcover: 912 pages. ISBN-10: 9780618374205.

Algebra 1 Concepts and Skills book. I actually read this book cover to cover because I was hoping for some inspiration when teaching algebra I in a direct instruction setting

Algebra 1 Concepts and Skills book. I actually read this book cover to cover because I was hoping for some inspiration when teaching algebra I in a direct instruction setting. Although I think that there is a need for some of the examples and the low level writing, many times I felt the book was pandering. Matthew and Kristin Mclean rated it liked it Apr 25, 2016.

Published April 27th 2001 by McDougal Littell. Algebra 1 Concepts and Skills: California Standards Key Concepts Book (Paperback). Published July 31st 2000 by Houghton Mifflin. Paperback, 255 pages. Hardcover, 832 pages.

The minimum, or maximum value is. the y- coordinate.

Most likely the pages are clean, as we look through each book twice, before we sell it. But, we are human, so there may be very limited underlining, or notes that we missed, but all words are readable.

Mcdougal littell algebra 1 concepts and skills? Unanswered Questions. It is my opinion that trigonometry is loosely based on Geometry. There are also new concepts introduced in Trig that don't require much algebra skills. Asked in Math and Arithmetic, Chemistry, Algebra.

ISBN 13: 9780618077281. ISBN 10: 0618077286 ISBN 13: 9780618077281. Publisher: MCDOUGAL LITTEL, 2001.

McDougal Littell Algebra 1 Concepts and Skills Larson Boswell Kanold Stiff Practice Workbook with Examples The . The workbook covers essential skills and vocabulary. Space is provided for students to show their work

McDougal Littell Algebra 1 Concepts and Skills Larson Boswell Kanold Stiff Practice Workbook with Examples The Practice Workbook provides additional practice with worked-out examples for every lesson. Space is provided for students to show their work.

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Algebra 1 textbook includes concepts and skills. This is a teachers edition that includes answers.
Reviews:
  • Tenius
As a parent from a public-school background making the transition to homeschool my teenager, I have found this book and the teacher's edition to be just what I needed. I chose this over both Saxon and Abeka, which are popular courses used in private schools. Ron Larson and his team have done a wonderful job clearly explaining the concepts, having plenty of practice problems, and what is more, giving practical application examples and keeping the interest of the students. Also the flow of the concepts is easy to follow. I have not had to deal with the "Why do I have to learn this?" question kids so often bring up. We made it through the first semester without the teacher's edition, but since it contains the test question answers I would recommend to purchase it as well. Both books were very reasonably priced as used books - please note the new book prices are extremely inflated. This book is useful for self-study as well. I had not studied algebra since 1985, and I had no problem re-learning everything I needed to teach my daughter.
  • Anararius
The Algebra 1 book by Larson (et alia) is outstanding. Please note: The book on this Amazon page is Algebra 1, Volume 1. You also need to buy Volume 2 (Algebra 1; Concepts and Skills, Volume 2), if you want the whole course. As an alternative, you can buy the combined course in one book (McDougal Littell Algebra 1: Applications, Equations, Graphs).

This book is very easy to read and understand. I would guess that it is written at the fifth grade level.

It is obvious to me that the designers of this textbook employed a systems approach to (1) meticulously identify all of the knowledge and skills required in an Algebra 1 course; (2) translate these into learning objectives for the course; (3) systematically identify course prerequisites (the starting point for the course); (4) specify final course outcome (the end point for the course); (5) sequence and repeat training to optimize learning and retention; and (6) design evaluation measures to ensure that each student has met the course objectives. In addition to systematically developing math skills, the book also ensures mastery of associated vocabulary terms (Key Words), as well as skills in the use of graphs and calculators.

Algebra 1 is a very challenging course to teach. I think every school district in America requires Algebra 1 for graduation. There is a huge, huge diversity among the students taking this course. Some might take this course in the sixth grade, while others might take it in the tenth grade. Some students will start this course entirely prepared, while others students might not even know how to add, subtract, multiply, or divide. Some students might eventually go on to obtain advanced degrees in (math-heavy) science or engineering, while others might work at a trade, while still others will never use any part of this course (ever) in their lives. How can one teacher with one textbook hope to effectively teach such a diverse population? Well, this textbook goes a long way toward specifying the contents of such a course and providing step-wise instruction that will allow most students to meet the course's objectives.

Math experts often find it difficult (or impossible) to teach math to beginners, because they have forgotten all the little steps required to gain mastery of the subject matter. This textbook brilliantly breaks the subject matter down into to small "chunks" (small enough to grasp in a few minutes at a time) then optimally sequences and integrates those "chunks" for effective learning. All along the way, student mastery of prerequisite learning is reviewed, retested, and systematically integrated with new learning. The book identifies prerequisite learning for the course in the form of a Pre-Course Test at the front of the book and a Skills Review at the back of the book.

Although not the focus of the book, students are systematically exposed to the types of problems that one might find on a standardized test (identified by Standardized Test Practice in the right margin). I think this is extremely important for this target population. I like the way the textbook includes calculator operations, without abandoning the need to perform calculations by hand or in the head. Some school districts seem to have adopted the philosophy that all calculations must be performed with a calculator (a very bad philosophy). I like how this book guides students to make "approximate" calculations - this is an excellent technique to possibly identify an error in a calculated outcome. The book is very effective in getting students to think about problems visually, including the creation and use of graphs and problem diagrams. I like how it gets students used to the idea of creating graphs similar to those one can produce in a spreadsheet program. There is an excellent Glossary in the back of the book, as well as an English-to-Spanish Glossary.

The examples and problems in the book are very good. Examples and problems systematically build from simple, short problems that ensure basic skills have been acquired to more difficult problems that integrate prior learning and apply multiple skills. The application problems are pretty good - - - many of them do a good job of steering the math from the abstract to the concrete. However, I would like to see the textbook designers bring in more "real world" algebra problems from craft disciplines (such as used by carpenters, electricians, electronics technicians, mechanics, sheet metal workers, pipe fitters, riggers, etc.).

The textbook is one of the very best I have ever seen at presenting information in a way that maximizes attention, memory, and understanding (the presentation reminds me of InfoMapping®). Information is presented in small, organized batches - - - small enough that the average student can keep focused on the specific topic under discussion (most folks can only keep five to seven objects in mind at any one time). Such a batch is clearly delimited (grouped under a colored header or inside of an example box or with a right-margin annotation), and never splits across a page. I appreciate how the book frequently and systematically reminds students of previous training via Study Tips, Skills Review, Mixed Review, and Maintaining Skills segments. The book has very smartly included Checkpoint problems that the student should complete prior to moving on to the next topic.

Although this textbook stands alone quite nicely, there are (naturally) many additional, supporting resources available for sale from the publisher (McDougalLittel, or search for Holt McDougal math algebra geometry).

The book includes (in the back) answers to only selected problems. I wish this book provided the answers to all of the problems, or (as is done customarily) all of the odd numbered problems. There is a Worked-Out Solution Key for this book (listed on the publisher's website); I do not have this book, so I do not know whether or not it provides answers to all of the questions in the book.
  • Kiutondyl
The Algebra 1 book by Larson (et alia) is outstanding. Please note: The book on this Amazon page is Volume 2. Volume 1 is sold separately: (Algebra 1: Concepts and Skills Volume 1). As an alternative, can buy the combined course in one book McDougal Littell Algebra 1: Applications, Equations, Graphs. Actually, Volume 2 includes an outstanding (91 page) review of Volume 1. If you learned algebra in the past and just want a review, Volume 2 might be all you need (i.e., since the review is so good, you may not need Volume 1).

This book is very easy to read and understand. I would guess that it is written at the fifth grade level.

It is obvious to me that the designers of this textbook employed a systems approach to (1) meticulously identify all of the knowledge and skills required in an Algebra 1 course; (2) translate these into learning objectives for the course; (3) systematically identify course prerequisites (the starting point for the course); (4) specify final course outcome (the end point for the course); (5) sequence and repeat training to optimize learning and retention; and (6) design evaluation measures to ensure that each student has met the course objectives. In addition to systematically developing math skills, the book also ensures mastery of associated vocabulary terms (Key Words), as well as skills in the use of graphs and calculators.

Algebra 1 is a very challenging course to teach. I think every school district in America requires Algebra 1 for graduation. There is a huge, huge diversity among the students taking this course. Some might take this course in the sixth grade, while others might take it in the tenth grade. Some students will start this course entirely prepared, while others students might not even know how to add, subtract, multiply, or divide. Some students might eventually go on to obtain advanced degrees in (math-heavy) science or engineering, while others might work at a trade, while still others will never use any part of this course (ever) in their lives. How can one teacher with one textbook hope to effectively teach such a diverse population? Well, this textbook goes a long way toward specifying the contents of such a course and providing step-wise instruction that will allow most students to meet the course's objectives.

Math experts often find it difficult (or impossible) to teach math to beginners, because they have forgotten all the little steps required to gain mastery of the subject matter. This textbook brilliantly breaks the subject matter down into to small "chunks" (small enough to grasp in a few minutes at a time) then optimally sequences and integrates those "chunks" for effective learning. All along the way, student mastery of prerequisite learning is reviewed, retested, and systematically integrated with new learning. The book identifies prerequisite learning for the course in the form of a Pre-Course Test at the front of the book and a Skills Review at the back of the book.

Although not the focus of the book, students are systematically exposed to the types of problems that one might find on a standardized test (identified by Standardized Test Practice in the right margin). I think this is extremely important for this target population. I like the way the textbook includes calculator operations, without abandoning the need to perform calculations by hand or in the head. Some school districts seem to have adopted the philosophy that all calculations must be performed with a calculator (a very bad philosophy). I like how this book guides students to make "approximate" calculations - this is an excellent technique to possibly identify an error in a calculated outcome. The book is very effective in getting students to think about problems visually, including the creation and use of graphs and problem diagrams. I like how it gets students used to the idea of creating graphs similar to those one can produce in a spreadsheet program. There is an excellent Glossary in the back of the book, as well as an English-to-Spanish Glossary.

The examples and problems in the book are very good. Examples and problems systematically build from simple, short problems that ensure basic skills have been acquired to more difficult problems that integrate prior learning and apply multiple skills. The application problems are pretty good - - - many of them do a good job of steering the math from the abstract to the concrete. However, I would like to see the textbook designers bring in more "real world" algebra problems from craft disciplines (such as used by carpenters, electricians, electronics technicians, mechanics, sheet metal workers, pipe fitters, riggers, etc.).

The textbook is one of the very best I have ever seen at presenting information in a way that maximizes attention, memory, and understanding (the presentation reminds me of InfoMapping®). Information is presented in small, organized batches - - - small enough that the average student can keep focused on the specific topic under discussion (most folks can only keep five to seven objects in mind at any one time). Such a batch is clearly delimited (grouped under a colored header or inside of an example box or with a right-margin annotation), and never splits across a page. I appreciate how the book frequently and systematically reminds students of previous training via Study Tips, Skills Review, Mixed Review, and Maintaining Skills segments. The book has very smartly included Checkpoint problems that the student should complete prior to moving on to the next topic.

Although this textbook stands alone quite nicely, there are (naturally) many additional, supporting resources available for sale from the publisher (McDougalLittel, or search for Holt McDougal math algebra geometry).

The book includes (in the back) answers to only selected problems. I wish this book provided the answers to all of the problems, or (as is done customarily) all of the odd numbered problems. There is a Worked-Out Solution Key for this book (listed on the publisher's website); I do not have this book, so I do not know whether or not it provides answers to all of the questions in the book.
  • Sagda
We always buy an extra copy of our son's math text, as he tends to forget or misplace his school copy. We've never had any problems with these books. As for its concepts and material, we don't have a choice, but I've found them to be fine with fairly well explained examples.