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Object-Oriented Programming Using C++ (Introduction to Programming) download ebook

by Joyce Farrell

Object-Oriented Programming Using C++ (Introduction to Programming) download ebook
ISBN:
1423902572
ISBN13:
978-1423902577
Author:
Joyce Farrell
Publisher:
Cengage Learning; 4 edition (June 24, 2008)
Language:
Pages:
816 pages
ePUB:
1501 kb
Fb2:
1601 kb
Other formats:
docx lrf lit lrf
Category:
Programming
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.4

By Joyce Farrell - Object-Oriented Programming Using C++: 4th . OOP Using C++ focuses too much on tutorials and spends little time explaining the concepts that the book introduces.

OOP Using C++ focuses too much on tutorials and spends little time explaining the concepts that the book introduces.

Object Oriented Programming using C 4 Contents Contents Foreword 11 1. .

Object Oriented Programming using C 4 Contents Contents Foreword 11 1 An Introductio. Object-Oriented Programming in C++ - KSU. 1,038 Pages·2011·8. C++ seamlessly blends object-oriented techniques with generic template guide to programming.

Joyce Farrell has authored several popular programming textbooks, including books on Programming Logic and Design, Java, C and C++. Her books are recognized for their clear, direct writing style and effective presentation. A well-respected instructor, Ms. Farrell has taught Computer Information Systems at Harper College in Palatine, Illinois; the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point; and McHenry County College in Crystal Lake, Illinois.

Object-Oriented Programming Using C++ book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Object-Oriented Programming Using C++ book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Object-Oriented Programming Using C++ as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Don’t forget to explain what a cast is. Note the difference between an implicit cast and an explicit cast. com/ to explain that you Tip can convert a character to its integer equivalent using a cast, and vice versa. Students may wonder if there is a difference between a C++ style static cast and Teaching a C style static cast.

By using these predefined objects, they should grasp the concepts and benefits to object-oriented programming, how to define their own objects and how to develop programs using object-oriented design methodology

By using these predefined objects, they should grasp the concepts and benefits to object-oriented programming, how to define their own objects and how to develop programs using object-oriented design methodology. They also are taught modern programming topics, such as event-driven programming.

A typical example of exception is division by zero during a program execution; however, there are a number of situations that can cause exceptions .

Department of Computer Science, MAJU Page 131 Lab Manual for Object-Oriented Programming (LAB-15) Exception Handling. A typical example of exception is division by zero during a program execution; however, there are a number of situations that can cause exceptions . array index out-of-bounds, file opening fail, and running out of memory. The response to the occurrence of an exception (or runtime error) is known as exception handling.

Joyce Farrell has authored several popular programming textbooks, including books on.Lots of books struggle to teach Object Oriented Programming and it's the first time I clearly understand the concept by using this book. Once I started reading Visual C 2015 by Joyce Farrell, I could not let it go and I am almost done reading cover to cover. There's a ton of examples in this book. Along the way, I have attempted to modify the codes to incorporate what I have learned in previous chapters to test myself which is part of learning.

Using object-oriented terminology from the start, Object-Oriented Programming Using C++, Fourth Edition, will provide readers with a solid foundation in C++ programming. Like its predecessors, the fourth edition uses clear, straightforward examples to teach both the syntax of the C++ language and sound programming principles. It begins with an overview of object-oriented programming and C++, and then builds upon this knowledge to teach increasingly complex concepts, such as inheritance, templates, handling exceptions, and advanced input and output. Aimed at providing readers with the most current programming knowledge, this edition has been updated to reflect the latest software, Visual C++ 2008.
Reviews:
  • Alsath
As a textbook the book is well written and easy to understand. It contains a number of excellent concise examples to support the topics presented. The brevity of the examples made up for the lack of a CD containing them. A bit repetitious in spots, but (in my humble opinion) this is better than the alternative. All-in-all I found this to be a solid learning vehicle. I do suspect a 5th edition will be required in order to correct (an unfortunate number of, I think) mis-statements. These, though, are not so numerous that it diminishes overall effectiveness of the book. If you are looking for a solid introduction to the C++ language, I think this textbook is great!
  • HappyLove
Funny, my professor didn't know that Stroustrup wrote textbooks for C++. Yes textbooks not just the compendium resource book he originally wrote to accompany the language. This book is horribly organized and better resources exist. Look around.
  • Dagdatus
Bought for a class that I ended up dropping. Really boring book though. Dropped the class because apparently I needed prerequisites that I didn't have..no idea what I was even allowed to enroll in it.
  • Downloaded
good and easy read book
  • Connorise
kind of dry and needs to include full programs instead of snippits at least in the beginning so as to not confuse the new readers.
  • Skyway
I use this book for a class that uses the 4th edition. I did not want to pay full price for the book so I found this for 93 cents. Everything in the class curriculum is covered in this book. Such a steal!
  • Sudert
I have been using this book as a text for the past 3 semesters and find it very frustrating to teach from. It contains errors which you would expect from a beginner or a non-C++ programmer. The author seems to have struggled to come up with 10 short chapters (or 'tutorials') worth of material--despite the fact that she left out several significant subjects. The approach is cute, but the examples are sparse and she never gets around to tying things together and showing readers the final result at the end of each chapter. An entire tutorial is devoted to 'friends' (we used to call this padding...). Another chapter (class design issues) discusses coupling and cohesion--but seems to have been taken from a previous work and awkwardly adapted to member functions so that it would fit the OOP theme (why?). The author seems unaware of ANSI/ISO '98 enhancements to the language (such as the "bool" data type) and never mentions the Standard Template Library. She refers to a typedef'd character array as "string", confusing students who have heard that there really is a string container class-- and applies the label "polymorphism" to nearly everything BUT virtual member functions, which she omits entirely. She confuses reference variables and reference parameters, stating that passing pointers is more flexible than pass-by-reference (which she never does label correctly). Interestingly, she does include nice chapters on exception handling and templates. You could probably stretch the material in this book to cover an 8- or 10-week course. Unfortunately, we have 16-week semesters. We adopted this book in an effort to simplify the material for community college students. I think we overdid it. Our previous text was Dietel and Dietel--which is at the other end of the spectrum. There must be a happy medium...
This book is too incomplete, even for just focusing on OOP with C++. I have another book which I also find inadequate, however while that book only diverts about 3 chapters to OOP, it does a better job of covering it then this entire book.

OOP Using C++ focuses too much on tutorials and spends little time explaining the concepts that the book introduces. Many examples at the end of each chapter take up several pages because the author steps you through every step of creating the example (once should have been enough... after the first chapter the user should not need to be reminded to "Open a new file in your C++ editor and type the statements that include the header files you need..."). The examples used in the book are all very similar and you quickly get tired of typing in the customer's last name...

The book has too much useless text and it is often hard to find a piece of useful information. It is basicly a programming novel. It covers the absolute basics of OOP without going into enough detail about how things really work. This is not a good thing, even for beginners, because if you do not learn how to use OOP well, you'll never write good code....

This is a truly boring and useless programming book that I regret ever purchasing. If you are a beginner, DO NOT GET THIS BOOK, it will break your C++ style and you might find it hard to adapt to what is considered "good programming style" at a later stage.

I recommend C++ Primer, it is much more detailed, costs less and covers much more C++ for beginners, including OOP.