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Linux Desktop Hacks: Tips & Tools for Customizing and Optimizing your OS download ebook

by Nicholas Petreley,Jono Bacon

Linux Desktop Hacks: Tips & Tools for Customizing and Optimizing your OS download ebook
ISBN:
0596009119
ISBN13:
978-0596009113
Author:
Nicholas Petreley,Jono Bacon
Publisher:
O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (March 28, 2005)
Language:
Pages:
352 pages
ePUB:
1600 kb
Fb2:
1646 kb
Other formats:
lrf azw txt lrf
Category:
Operating Systems
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.6

One of the latest Hacks titles from O'Reilly takes on the Linux desktop - Linux Desktop Hacks by Nicholas Petreley . in this case, the Linux desktop.

One of the latest Hacks titles from O'Reilly takes on the Linux desktop - Linux Desktop Hacks by Nicholas Petreley and Jono Bacon  . I was expecting to pick up a lot of hints and tips like - Reduce OpenOffice. org Startup Time, - Start Desktop Applications Automatically, and - Protect Yourself From Windows Applications.

But unless you are using a Linux distro that is 4 years ol. .this book is worthless to you. And if you are into Linux, you are NOT about having a 4 year old distro!!! lol. OREILLY needs to update this

But unless you are using a Linux distro that is 4 years ol. OREILLY needs to update this. It is hard though because Linux distros can change or be completely overhauled within 6 months. Скачать (chm, 453 Kb).

With hacks that any user can follow, Linux Desktop Hacks demonstrates how easy it is to modify Linux to suit your desires. The book is packed with tips on customizing and improving the interface, boosting performance, administering your desktop, and generally making the most out of what X, KDE, Gnome, and the console have to offer.

Linux Desktop Hacks book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Linux Desktop Hacks: Tips & Tools for Customizing and Optimizing your OS. by. Nicholas Petreley

On July 20, we had the largest server crash in the last 2 years.

On July 20, we had the largest server crash in the last 2 years. Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 8. 2% restored

Author: Nicholas Petreley Jono Bacon.

Author: Nicholas Petreley Jono Bacon.

Linux Desktop Hacks : Tips and Tools for Customizing and Optimizing Your OS. by Jono Bacon and Nicholas . by Jono Bacon and Nicholas Petreley.

Linux Desktop Hacks: Tips & Tools for Customizing and Optimizing your OS. Nicholas Petreley, Jono Bacon.

Many users are content with the tools and facilities included with these desktops, but-for those who are ready to probe a little deeper-much more functionality can be found by going under the hood.

Find nearly any book by Nicholas Petreley. by Nicholas Petreley, Jono Bacon. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. ISBN 9780596009113 (978-0-596-00911-3) Softcover, O'Reilly Media, 2005. Official Fedora Companion: Your Guide to the Fedora Project.

The KDE and Gnome desktops have developed into mature operating environments. These technologies not only act as interfaces between the user, the powerful Linux kernel and GNU operating system, but they do so in a fun and intuitive way. Many users are content with the tools and facilities included with these desktops, but--for those who are ready to probe a little deeper--much more functionality can be found by going under the hood.With hacks that any user can follow, Linux Desktop Hacks demonstrates how easy it is to modify Linux to suit your desires. The book is packed with tips on customizing and improving the interface, boosting performance, administering your desktop, and generally making the most out of what X, KDE, Gnome, and the console have to offer.From the practical to the whimsical, and some things you never thought of trying, the hacks in the book include the following, and more:

Kill and Resurrect the Master Boot RecordJazz Up Your Debian System BootEnergize Your Console with Macro Music MagicKonquer Remote Systems Without PasswordsRun KDE on the Bleeding EdgeView Microsoft Word Documents in a TerminalRead Yahoo! Mail from Any Email ClientMotion Capture and Video Conferencing FunAutomate Your Life with cronProtect Yourself from Windows ApplicationsMake an Internet Connection Using Bluetooth and a Mobile PhonePrint to Unsupported PrintersAccelerate Your GamingIf you're yearning for information to make the Linux desktop easier, more powerful, and more fun, Linux Desktop Hacks is just the ticket.
Reviews:
  • Reighbyra
Awesome! Fast delivery!
  • Bragis
One of the latest Hacks titles from O'Reilly takes on the Linux desktop - Linux Desktop Hacks by Nicholas Petreley and Jono Bacon. It's good stuff, but not quite what I thought it would be...

Chapter List: Booting Linux; Console; Login Managers; Related to X; KDE Desktop; GNOME Desktop Hacks; Terminal Empowerment; Desktop Programs; Administration and Automation; Kernel; Hardware; Index

Like all Hacks titles, this book is made up of 100 tips and tricks that you can do and that are related to the subject matter of the book... in this case, the Linux desktop. I was expecting to pick up a lot of hints and tips like #55 - Reduce OpenOffice.org Startup Time, #72 - Start Desktop Applications Automatically, and #80 - Protect Yourself From Windows Applications. Those are some cool things, and they relate directly to what I usually think of when I envision the Linux desktop. But you'll also find things like #81 - Build a Custom Firewall Computer, #88 - Compile a Kernel, and #2 - Kill and Resurrect the Master Boot Record. Once again, all very good and interesting stuff, but it seems to stray somewhat from the "Linux desktop" premise (or at least what I was expecting it to be). There are also plenty of instances where you need to be up to speed with scripting skills so you can change config files or compile and install software. I realize that the Linux desktop isn't all automated installers and such, but there seemed to be a lot of times where you always ended up back at the command line console.

Perhaps not being a Linux or Unix geek yet, I'm inclined to think of "desktop" as graphical user interface when it actually can be a number of things.

So... I like the book, and if you're into running Linux as your main operating system at the desktop level, you'll get a lot out of this book. Just be forewarned that it may not contain exactly what you expected...
  • Hurus
For linux sysadmins and users, the operating system offers a huge amount of flexibility and customisation. Alas, many might not be fully aware of the numerous tweaks you can perform. So this book tries to educate you. Naturally, a lot of the hacks relate to the desktop. The book allocates a chapter each to the KDE and Gnome desktops. It does not play favourites by suggesting one is better than the other. So the authors pragmatically support both.

As a sign of the book's recent vintage, there is one hack involving Firefox. But given that this browser's rise has scarcely halted, if there is a future edition of this book, we can expect far more hacks on Firefox.

Perhaps it is a good sign of linux's security that the only mention of viruses in the book is in the context of running Microsoft Windows emulators or in reading Microsoft Windows documents.
  • Jek
Linux Desktop Hacks: Tips & Tools for Customizing and Optimizing Your OS is one of the better choices among the books of this genre. Although I have worked with Linux for years there were still several tips in here that I did not know and found very useful. Each chapter focuses on a particular area of the desktop computer and how you can make it perform the way it should or look totally different. Some of the subjects covered include changing the Boot Manager, bypassing the Manager, redefining keys, using macros, switching users, using multiple desktops, using creative cursors, using Windows and Mac fonts, running the desktop over the Internet, sharing applications and monitors, viewing Microsoft Word Documents in a Terminal, displaying a PDF document in a terminal, reducing startup time, encrypting email, configure Firefox, forwarding ports, new user setup, link monitoring, tweaking the kernel without recompiling, using unsupported printers, and boosting hard-drive performance. An excellent resource for those who have moved to Linux on the desktop, Linux Desktop Hacks is highly recommended.
  • BlackHaze
This book arrived on a day when my Linux wasn't cooperating. I looked in the book's table of contents to see if it had any hack I could use. I immediately found several useful ones. I was able to solve my networking problem of the day. This book has 100 hacks. You are not going to use all of them. But you will use enough to find this book worth the cost. It has some very useful shortcuts for console use that will make you look like a power Unix user in no time. I definitely recommend this book. It's a good reference tool for those days when you just need to look up something quick. And it's a good study when you have time to devote to really learning better scripting.
  • Karon
Linux Desktop Hacks carries forward the good work of the "Hacks" Series from O'Reilly. The Desktop is a niche area and a potential minefield with each end user having his/her own idea of what all can be done with the desktop.

The book manages to steer clear of becoming a simple reference guide for newbies, yet at the same time manages to cram a lot of power hacks that will appeal to the end users.

The book is well organised - taking the user through the booting process into tweaking the Desktop Environments. And as is the norm, the Hacks can stand alone by themselves or be interlinked. It is possible to link across the hacks.

By themselves, the hacks manage to answer some of the famous newbie questions on various User Group mailing lists - for example hack # 2 (killing and restoring the MBR). Chapters 9 & 10 dealing with Administration and Automation, Kernel contain hacks which power users will enjoy trying out.

On a personal note, some more detail about commercial distributions like Red Hat, Mandrake, Novell etc would have increased the appeal of this book to the desktop users of commercial desktop distributions. But this small glitch does in no way take the credit for the extreme level of detail and collation and compilation finesse shown by the authors. A nice read and a must have.