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The Devil and Sonny Liston download ebook

by Nick Tosches

The Devil and Sonny Liston download ebook
ISBN:
0316897469
ISBN13:
978-0316897464
Author:
Nick Tosches
Publisher:
Back Bay Books (December 6, 2001)
Language:
Pages:
288 pages
ePUB:
1917 kb
Fb2:
1761 kb
Other formats:
azw lrf txt lit
Category:
Biographies
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.5

Extraordinary praise for Nick Tosches’s The Devil and Sonny Liston In Nick Tosches, a writer of. .In Nick Tosches, a writer of rare humanity, Sonny Liston has finally found someone prepared to assess his complex journey.

Extraordinary praise for Nick Tosches’s The Devil and Sonny Liston In Nick Tosches, a writer of rare humanity, Sonny Liston has finally found someone prepared to assess his complex journey.

40 people found this helpful. The Murder of Sonny Liston: Las Vegas, Heroin, and Heavyweights.

This is where THE DEVIL AND SONNY LISTON becomes interesting. Tosches seems to want to write an expose. In this Book Nick Tosches' narrative just got to me and I found his style overbearing and unenjoyable. The problem is that he does not have the whole story.

The Devil and Sonny Liston is a biography of world heavyweight champion boxer Sonny Liston by Nick Tosches. The book's title is a reference to the story "The Devil and Daniel Webster".

Louis pleaded the Fifth Amendment in refusing to answer questions about the management of Sonny Liston, the No. 1 heavyweight contender. A St. Louis police lieutenant, Joseph Kuda, also called to appear that day, testified that Carbo owned fifty two percent of the contractual interest in Liston, that Palermo owned.

The other Liston book, SONNY is crap too I'm afraid

The other Liston book, SONNY is crap too I'm afraid. Best writing by miles on Sonny Liston is defintely KINGS OF THE WORLD - Dave Remnick (?) Top. wouter. Early in The Devil and Sonny Liston, Tosches writes that only Liston "and the man who killed him knew the date of his death," a fine tease if ever there was one.

Now in paperback: Nick Tosches's brutal, stunning, and widely praised biography of Sonny Liston - the world .

Now in paperback: Nick Tosches's brutal, stunning, and widely praised biography of Sonny Liston - the world heavyweight champion who hit harder than any man alive,. A biography of the controversial fighter follows Liston from the mean streets, where he was a petty criminal, to the heavyweight championship and his life as a pawn of organized crime. By the author of Power on Earth.

The Devil and Sonny Liston. From "New York Times" bestselling author Nick Tosches comes a novel about a man, haunted by demons, who finds salvation in an unlikely source. Me and the Devil: A Novel.

A biography of the controversial fighter follows Liston from the mean streets, where he was a petty criminal, to the heavyweight championship and his life as a pawn of organized crime. By the author of Power on Earth. Reprint. 25,000 first printing.
Reviews:
  • Welen
All you have to know about this book and how much the author knows about boxing, is this: Nick Tosches stated that Archie Moore threw his fight with Rocky Marciano. Moore, if he were to thow a fight could have found a bit easier way of doing so than than taking the pounding he did from the Rock. Just watch the last three rounds of the fight and you tell me if this was a thrown fight. Fair or not, this one seemingly innocuous passage, lost total credibility of the author for me. I paid for this book and now regret it. If you want good stuff on Liston from credible sources (though you may no agree with everything they write) read William Nack' SI piece, Nigel Collins' Boxing Babylon or The HBO documentary on Liston. Tosches may have done some incredible research here, but I don't view him as a reliable source.
  • Felhann
I personally enjoyed the book. I have never read anything about Sonny Liston. I remember the fight that made him champion and the fight where he lost the title and the one with the phantom punch. Since reading the book. I checked out his fights via youtube andgained clarification about him. He was the best in the world in his prime. His life outside the ring was the thing that killed him withe public, The political Powers in the U.S.A.,and his backers Truman gibson,Frankie Carbo,Blinky Palermo who began to lose money on him by quashing scandals,getting him out of jail and etc. He was his biggest enemy and it was understandable when his backers gravitated to the up and comer Cassius Clay who provided a better image for boxing bought him three months before the championship fight in February 1964 and forced im to give up the title. He under better circumstances would have crushed Cassius clay but had lost his enthusiam by fight night. He was not the same fighter that was shown in the youtube clips,he did try to blind Cassius Clay when his handler put liniment on his gloves almost causing Clay to quit. Sonny Liston was seen in his entirety through this story by nick toshes
  • cyrexoff
Tosches, regardless of whether or not it was accurate, paints quite a picture with his work. One of his theses is that Sonny Liston was always the sharecropper's kid, even as a successful boxer. That's why, in Tosches' view, Sonny wouldn't have had difficulty doing what he was told from "the man."

Maybe, maybe not. In any event Mr. Tosches covers the events of Sonny Liston's life. This book has no light spots, really. It's all medium gray to black. Maybe it's this perceived lack of contrast that irritates some readers. Maybe that's the way Sonny Liston's life really was.

The Liston that Tosches leaves us with isn't particularly likeable, but somehow you end up feeling something for the man. In the end, I get the impression from Mr. Tosches that he's telling us that Sonny was our creation, that we made him. To that degree, perhaps we deserved some of the unpleasantness that came from the sad boxer with the massive hands and the pile-driving punch. And, maybe, to that degree Sonny was a victim.

I'd give the book a 3 for substance and a 5 for style. Guess I'll settle for a 4. And "settling" is pretty much what Liston's life was about.
  • Jediathain
Well written. A very interesting historical and psychological approach.
  • Throw her heart
Nick Tosches is a wannabe. A fellow who tries too hard to be a tough-guy New York scribe, a hard-boiled Jimmy Breslin been-there badge-out type, who uses too many gratuitous obscenities and throwaway racist insults. A guy who writes in his own cover-blurb bio that he was "schooled in his father's bar...and his poetry readings are legend." Give me a break. He wastes a lot of over-research trying to set a dark mystical ambience for this Liston bio, so we get pages of pseudo-Joseph Conrad stuff about Dahomey slavery and Mississippi Choctaw, boll weevils and a 5th century bishop. Show-off meaningless riffs on Janus the god and Aristotle on slavery. Of course, this from a guy who thinks Aristotle is a "pillar of Judeo-Christian thought". Who gives us three pages on the history of slavery as he contemplates Liston's condition like he would his own navel. Yawn. And then a bunch of hard-guy talk about God's "white a**" and racist nonsense from an oh-too-black white guy, despite his comment that Liston was remarkably free of racial prejudice.
Finally, about fifty pages in, we get to Liston and his boxing career. If you've made it this far, you can make it to the end. Tosches' research has yielded infinitely more about dozens of long-forgotten hoods than about Liston himself, what he thinks, what he says. The fights are barely mentioned at all. But just when Liston's life gets interesting, Tosches lapses into another unreadable passage about wind and blood and incomprehensible tough-guy jargon that must pass for profundity at Toshche's `legendary' poetry readings. He twice mentions, apropos of absolutely nothing, that Joe Kennedy earned dirty money, calling JFK "the brat offspring of a criminal fortune". Wha? Why is that here? It doesn't even rhyme with the line before it.
He has lots of unsupported conspiracy theories. "America did not want Sonny as her champion", the Black Muslims "got to Sonny", this after earnestly explaining that "Islam was a religion of slavery" (p.217). Finally, with no evidence except his own attitude, he opines that "to accept the premise that Sonny was murdered is, by necessity, to accept the involvement and the malfeasance of cops in that murder." Um, ok, Nick.
Strangely enough, the book is not an utter failure. Sonny Liston as a character is so outsized and compelling that he manages to seize the reader's interest in spite of Tosches' very best efforts to reduce the story to nonsense. It's hardly recommended, but if you find yourself on a deserted island with it, and you tear out the first fifty and last ten pages, well, the rest of the book would be passable with some judicious editing.
  • Zovaithug
Very pleased
  • Wiliniett
Sonny was a "bad man".
This was an excellent bio by a fine writer. At times I thought he swayed from the subject of Mr. Liston and lost his clear and consice voice, but these instances were relitvely rare. I reccommend this anyone who enjoys bios and excellent writing.