cerkalo
» » One God One Lord: Early Christian Devotion and Ancient Jewish Monotheism

One God One Lord: Early Christian Devotion and Ancient Jewish Monotheism download ebook

by Larry W. Hurtado

One God One Lord: Early Christian Devotion and Ancient Jewish Monotheism download ebook
ISBN:
0800620763
ISBN13:
978-0800620769
Author:
Larry W. Hurtado
Publisher:
Fortress Pr (June 1, 1988)
Language:
Pages:
178 pages
ePUB:
1685 kb
Fb2:
1887 kb
Other formats:
mobi rtf lit doc
Category:
Worship & Devotion
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.4

Professor Hurtado traces the rise of ideas of Christ's divinity to Jewish sources. He shows that Christians naturally relied on Jewish concepts of a principal angelic helper to God to understand the meaning of Jesus' mission.

Professor Hurtado traces the rise of ideas of Christ's divinity to Jewish sources. Christians worshipped their mediator figure, thus ensuring an eventual break with Judaism. one of the most interesting Christologies of the decade.

Early christian devotion and ancient jewish monotheism. This book represents a third approach, which much more carefully observes the evidence of ancient Jewish religion and the chronological constraints of the very early emergence of Christ-devotion. T&t clark edinburgh. With others, I contend that we are required to understand the origin of cultic devotion to Jesus as a novel development that drew upon the Jewish religious tradition and the conceptual categories it provided, and re-shaped them under the impact of the features of the religious life of earliest Christian groups.

This 40-day devotional and journal is based on the exciting Kingdom of God series by best-selling.

Women of the Bible: A One-Year Devotional Study of Women. This 40-day devotional and journal is based on the exciting Kingdom of God series by best-selling. 48 MB·14,332 Downloads·New!

Mobile version (beta).

Mobile version (beta). One God, One Lord: Early Christian Devotion and Ancient Jewish Monotheism. Download (pdf, . 4 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF.

One God, One Lord book. Hurtado rejects the idea that such acceptance stemmed from the Gentile side of the church and that Jewish Christians did not see Jesus as divine

One God, One Lord book. Hurtado rejects the idea that such acceptance stemmed from the Gentile side of the church and that Jewish Christians did not see Jesus as divine. Rather, he says that the idea of divinity was routed in certain concepts having to do with a kind of second in charge or command, behind God-a divine agent who works for and on behalf of and in place of God. This agent can be found in various forms: as a personified attribute, such as wisdom or the word; as an angel; or as an important human figure/prophet.

Larry Hurtado's One God, One Lord has . Hurtado examines the early cultic devotion to Jesus through a range of Jewish sources.

Larry Hurtado's One God, One Lord has been described as 'one of the most important and provocative Christologies of all time' (Alan F. Segal). The book has taken its place among works on Jesus as one consistently cited, consistently read, and consistently examined in scholarly discourse. Hurtado outlines an early 'high' Christological theology, showing how the Christ of faith emerges from monotheistic Judaism.

Larry W. Hurtado Also the fact that these Jewish Christians claimed they were strictly monotheistic.

The classic and ground-breaking work in Christology, with extensive new introduction, evaluating the most recent developments in current scholarship. Also the fact that these Jewish Christians claimed they were strictly monotheistic. It is my belief that if we don't stop reading the scriptures with westernized eyes we will fall into trouble making scriptures say what we want to hear. By allowing the earliest Jewish Christians to talk and show us how they regarded Jesus, I think the long-term debate over the deity of Christ will be ultimately settled. It did for me. Unless you have a prejudiced agenda, you should see.

One God, One Lord: Early Christian Devotion and Ancient Jewish Monotheism. Philadelphia, PA: Fortress Press.

Hurtado examines the early cultic devotion to Jesus through a range of Jewish sources. Hurtado outlines an early 'high' Christological theology, showing how the Christ of faith emerges from monotheistic Judaism

Hurtado examines the early cultic devotion to Jesus through a range of Jewish sources.

The classic and ground-breaking work in Christology, with extensive new introduction, evaluating the most recent developments in current scholarship.
Reviews:
  • Nalaylewe
Excellent copy! A wonderful book to read! Thanks!
  • Opilar
In this book, Hurtado explores various "divine agency" concepts in the 2nd temple Jewish period, particularly those of: 1) personified divine attributes (e.g., Word, Wisdom), 2) exalted patriarchs, and 3) primary angels. He shows that when such figures assume a singularly unique role next to God; they are characterized by the ascription of divine qualities.
His main argument, in this context, is that in none of the extant writings do we find worship directed to a divine agent--worship is reserved for and solely directed toward God. For this reason, he claims the distinctive mutation in Christian faith is that worship is offered both to God and Christ. He makes it clear that the Jewish divine agency category does not, itself, explain why this occurred, but only that it provides a conceptual context or framework for expressing such a mutation.
In a final chapter, Hurtado offers an explanation for what caused this mutation. Basically, he discusses two key factors: 1) the historical ministry of Jesus gave rise to Jesus' distinctive role; and 2) the experiences of the early disciples were such that they were compelled to express worship toward Jesus alongside of God.
Some key issues in response to his book. 1) He does not fully delineate what he means by "worship." Without a clear definite idea of what constitutes worship, it is difficult to justify claiming Jesus as a singular exception in extant Jewish writings in the 1st century. We do, in fact, have "praise" directed to angels and exalted patriarchs in writings in this period. 2) He does not "spell out" exactly what in the experience of the disciples led them to worship Jesus, and what it means to say they "directed" worship toward Jesus. If other figures were fully accorded divine qualities, as Jesus, except for worship, then why not direct worship to these other figures as well? Hurtado and others are continuing to research this subject area. Papers from the St. Andrews Conference on the historical origins of worship of Jesus were just released for publication, in a book entitled THE JEWISH ROOTS OF CHRISTOLOGICAL MONOTHEISM.