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Sweet Zen: Dharma Talks from Cheri Huber download ebook

by Sara Jenkins

Sweet Zen: Dharma Talks from Cheri Huber download ebook
ISBN:
0963078445
ISBN13:
978-0963078445
Author:
Sara Jenkins
Publisher:
Present Perfect Books (September 1, 2000)
Language:
Pages:
200 pages
ePUB:
1672 kb
Fb2:
1547 kb
Other formats:
azw lrf txt doc
Category:
Buddhism
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.4

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Sweet Zen: Dharma Talks from Cheri Huber as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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Sweet Zen is an impressive compendium of clear and inspiring teachings showcasing Zen Buddhist approaches to spiritual practice. An articulate and inspiring rebuttal to the notion that deprivation is good for the soul or that to be spiritual one must give up the things of the world for the sake of some imagined ideal of purity, Sweet Zen is a truly enlightened and enlightening invitation to participate fully and joyfully in life.

Items related to Sweet Zen: Dharma Talks from Cheri Huber. Cheri Huber is the author of 19 books, including There Is Nothing Wrong with You, When You're Falling, Dive,and Time-Out for Parents. Sara Jenkins Sweet Zen: Dharma Talks from Cheri Huber. ISBN 13: 9780963078445.

Offering the unusual perspective on the softness and sweetness to be discovered in the Zen path

Offering the unusual perspective on the softness and sweetness to be discovered in the Zen path. which has long been associated with formality and even harshness, this book includes the traditional rigor of Zen practice, but is balanced and eased with ever-growing compassion for the self and for the suffering caused by the delusion that we are separate from all that is.

Trying To Be Human: Zen Teaching from Cheri Huber.

The talks, which address ordinary concerns in contemporary life, are short and clearly focused. Trying To Be Human: Zen Teaching from Cheri Huber. Cheri’s approach brings a light, often humorous touch to this gentle path to personal transformation.

Offering the unusual perspective on the softness and sweetness to be discovered in the Zen path. Library descriptions.

Huber is the founder and guiding teacher of Zen Monastery Peace Center located in Murphys, California, which was constructed in 1993. The plot of land was purchased in 1987, with 320 acres (. km2). She was raised in the San Francisco Bay area and claims to have studied Zen under Jay DuPont

item 5 Sara Jenkins-Sweet Zen (US IMPORT) BOOK NEW -Sara Jenkins-Sweet Zen (US IMPORT) BOOK . Additional Product Features. Sara Jenkins, Cheri Huber. Place of Publication.

item 5 Sara Jenkins-Sweet Zen (US IMPORT) BOOK NEW -Sara Jenkins-Sweet Zen (US IMPORT) BOOK NEW. £. 4. Free postage -Sweet ZEN: Dharma Talks from Cheri Huber (Paperback), Jenkins, S. .

She lives in Lake Junaluska, North Carolina. Cheri Huber is the author of 19 books, including There Is Nothing Wrong with You, When You're Falling, Dive, and Time-Out for Parents.

Cheri Huber, Sara B. Jenkins. Trying To Be Human: Zen Talks from Cheri Huber. Interviews with fifteen monks offer vivid personal glimpses of how everything about the monastery-from th. More). AIAA 90-0224 Large-Amplitude High-Rate Roll Experiments on a Delta and Double Delta. Ernest S. Hanff, Sara B. Cheri Huber, Sara B.

Offering the unusual perspective on the softness and sweetness to be discovered in the Zen path., which has long been associated with formality and even harshness, this book includes the traditional rigor of Zen practice, but is balanced and eased with ever-growing compassion for the self and for the suffering caused by the delusion that we are separate from all that is.
Reviews:
  • Lyrtois
I love all of Cheri Huber's work but this is my favorite! These are clear, compassionate statements of truth. I am finding it very helpful. I highly recommend this book!
  • Hap
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ABOUT THE BOOK:

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This book is a wonderful collection of (very) short [1-3 pages, each] "lessons" about the experience of the Soto Zen Buddhism path.

Buddhism as in inspired by that guy, the Buddha; Zen as in the japanese flavor of this religion; and Soto as in the one of the two Zen schools of japanese buddhism.

Each "lesson" is Cheri talking about the experience of seeing and living life through the Zen lense.

One could say that the reader is left with a sense that this "religion" is more of a way of life than a religion. There are no beliefs; nothing to achieve; nothing to attain; nothing to fell guilty for.

So, what is it? Exactly! And this book does a brilliant job of sketching a description of the answer.

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HOW I USE THIS BOOK (AND WHAT I GET OUT OF IT):

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I use this book as an integral part of my own sitting practice. I will sit for a few minutes, relaxing, watching my breath. Then, I'll pick this book up and start with the next essay. I take a breath and read for as far as that breath will take me. Then I pause and allow the words to flow over my heart as I take in the next breath. I chew these dharma talks. Once I finish that essay, I set the book down and complete my sitting meditation.

I find that doing this is beneficial in many ways.

First and foremost, just being around someone who points at reality and does so in an accessible way seems to massage my consciousness so that I'm more likely to come to center (i.e. a state of consciousness where I experience peace, sometimes bliss, and just a general good feeling).

Second, I learn little tidbits about Buddhism. Before I read this book, I knew there were two schools of Zen, but didn't understand the difference between the two. Now, I have a better idea. I have come to see bits of the words attributed to the Buddha himself. In short, I learned a little bit more about Buddhism, in general.

Finally, and really most valuable to me, there are precious drops of wisdom (dharma?!) contained within. I have had the repeated experience of making the peaceful, loving choice...often encouraged by these wisdoms.

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A CONCRETE EXAMPLE:

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How about a concrete example? :)

A four page talk entitled "decisions" (pp. 140-3).

In a nutshell, it is about seeing the difference between "noodling" and "awareness arising". In the first paragraph, the teacher says, "I would encourage you to look for it, because I am strongly suggesting that there is a difference -- and that difference is the source of suffering in life."

Noodling is the mind muling over the options. Do I want this job or that job? Do I want this car or that car? Should I tell him that secret or keep it to myself? What are the pros and cons?

Awareness arising is the subtle appearance of intelligence in the form of a soft but solid knowing. There are no pat answers, no formula for figuring life out. The inherent wisdom in life comes from being in a state of consciousness that is most harmonious with life (often referred to as "being at center.")

So what? :) Isn't thinking through the problem the "right" way to be? We're not advocating just blindly making decisions, right? :)

Here's the essential point. It's not WHAT I decide that determines whether my life is full of joy, peace, and a sense of wellbeing...no...it's HOW I decide.

Engaging whole-heartedly in Noodling starts with the implicit belief that I can figure life out with my noggin. This same tool is wrought with whole systems of contradictory beliefs. I want this job because it affords me career advancement, that's important. I want that job because it's a steady 9-to-5. But the first job involves travel; and the second job will probably mean I loose my technical edge. I don't want to give up my dream of being among the best in the business, but I want to be available to my family. And if this debating wasn't enough, another part of me starts in with "oh boy, here we go again. You gonna analyze this one to death too? Should I fire up Excel? We gonna do a speadsheet and give all the factors a weight and calculate the result?"......see? No clear answer...nothing but endless "valid", "contradictory" points and in-fighting. This is the anatomy of suffering: being torn in pieces. Ouch!

So, what other choice is there? Awareness Arising! So, what's the trick? How does one move from Noodling to Awareness Arising? Cheri makes it as plain as possible:

"The secret of getting back to a centered place (rather than to a part of our personality who hates ruminating, for instance) is genuinely wanting to know about ruminating, as opposed to wanting to figure out the right decision. If we are ruminating and we feel helpless and hopeless, then we are trapped in a victimized relationship to ruminating, locked in a death dance with it. When we become /interested/ in the ruminating, rather than in the content of any specific rumination, poof -- we are free from it. And the decision will make itself."

For me, instead of worrying about the solution, I turn my attention on the PROCESS of noddling. Instead of getting all caught up in this whole job dilema, I step back from the debate and start to see the action for what it is: two parts of my self going at. At that moment, something in my consciousness slipped. I no longer felt as compelled to participate. I was finding myself embracing these two with love and compassion. In that second and with no logical connection, I knew I was going to take the other job. And then started down that road. This time, I walked on with a sense of peace...not just about this matter, but about life in general...even in the face of impending change.

WOW.

(One important note. I am not confused that somehow this book transformed my life. The knowledge I gained from the book brought to my attention the posibility of another choice. It was the "stepping back" and in Cheri's words "genuinely wanting to know about ruminating" that was life transforming. But, any tool that can help me get there!)
  • Buge
Sweet Zen is an impressive compendium of clear and inspiring teachings showcasing Zen Buddhist approaches to spiritual practice. Trained in the Soto tradition of Zen Buddhism, Cheri Huber has taught meditation for more than 20 years. An articulate and inspiring rebuttal to the notion that deprivation is good for the soul or that to be spiritual one must give up the things of the world for the sake of some imagined ideal of purity, Sweet Zen is a truly enlightened and enlightening invitation to participate fully and joyfully in life.