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Soviet Asian Ethnic Frontiers (Pergamon policy studies on the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe) download ebook

by William O. McCagg,B.D. Silver

Soviet Asian Ethnic Frontiers (Pergamon policy studies on the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe) download ebook
ISBN:
0080246370
ISBN13:
978-0080246376
Author:
William O. McCagg,B.D. Silver
Publisher:
Pergamon Press; First Edition edition (September 1979)
Language:
Pages:
350 pages
ePUB:
1220 kb
Fb2:
1895 kb
Other formats:
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Category:
Sociology
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

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Soviet Asian Ethnic Frontiers book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. by. William O. McCagg, Jr.

Although the Soviet system has changed since Stalin's death, it remains fundamentally authoritarian in character. October 1983 · Social Science Information Studies. The use of models, such as totalitarian, authoritarian, bureaucratic, corporatist, and pluralist, hinders rather than facilitates an understanding of Soviet politics and of the place of interest groups in that system.

Beginning in 1967, the Soviet Union began to practice naval diplomacy in its coercive forms, with profound consequences for world politics. This volume concentrates on the use of the Soviet Navy as an instrument of diplomacy in the Afro-Asian Third World. Soviet activism has been concentrated in the Third World largely because the situation there is more fluid and the opportunities for assisted change greater than in Europe: political alignments are more flexible, and the risks entailed by a diplomacy of force are more tolerable.

Pergamon Policy Studies on The Soviet Union and Eastern Europe The book also considers the attitudes of various factions of economists such as reactionaries, conservatives, and modernizers toward th. .

Soviet Economic Thought and Political Power in the USSR: Pergamon Policy Studies on The Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. Soviet Economic Thought and Political Power in the USSR examines the evolution of economic theory in the Soviet Union from uniformity under Josef Stalin to diversity in the post-Stalin period. The book also considers the attitudes of various factions of economists such as reactionaries, conservatives, and modernizers toward the question of the limitation of the leaders' power and toward some areas of economics, such as problems of mathematical modeling and institutional economics, and toward the Marxist ideology.

Part Six contains translated documents from the Soviet and East European archives that help explain the impact of the broadcasts.

Appendix A cites types of jamming, and Appendix B provides an example of a shortwave broadcasting station. The Radios nevertheless had large listenerships, as is demonstrated in the chapters on Soviet and Polish audiences, based on external and once-secret internal polling data. Appendix C presents East European and Soviet listener data; additional Soviet data are included in Chapter Five. Part Six contains translated documents from the Soviet and East European archives that help explain the impact of the broadcasts.

In Soviet Asian Ethnic Frontiers, eds. and Brian D. Silver. The Uyghurs as a Part of Central Asian Commonality: Soviet Historiography on the Uyghurs. New York, NY: Pergamon Press, 195–226. In Situating the Uyghurs between China and Central Asia, eds. Indik Bellér Hann, et. al.

Soviet Union authorities and leaders officially condemned nationalism and proclaimed internationalism, including the right of nations and peoples to self-determination. However, in practice they conducted complete opposite policies including but not limited to; systematic large-scale cleansing of ethnic minorities, political repression and various forms of ethnic and social discrimination, including state-enforced antisemitism and Polonophobia.

The Soviet Union, officially known as the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), was a federal sovereign state in northern Eurasia that existed from 1922 to 1991. Nominally a union of multiple national Soviet republics, in practice its government and economy were highly centralized.

The Soviet Union, as the new political entity was known, called for world Communist revolution in the name of the international working class and advocated, in its propaganda, the eventual disappearance of national, cultural, religious, and economic distinctions. Since powerful elites could not be expected to voluntarily give up control, the Communists predicted a violent revolution that would destroy these classes. As a result of this prediction, middle-class societies in Europe and North America perceived the Soviet Union as a cultural and economic threat.