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Annihilating Difference: The Anthropology of Genocide download ebook

by Kenneth Roth,Alexander Laban Hinton

Annihilating Difference: The Anthropology of Genocide download ebook
ISBN:
0520230299
ISBN13:
978-0520230293
Author:
Kenneth Roth,Alexander Laban Hinton
Publisher:
University of California Press; First edition (August 19, 2002)
Language:
Pages:
420 pages
ePUB:
1450 kb
Fb2:
1212 kb
Other formats:
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Category:
Social Sciences
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.4

This volume―a collection of writings on genocide from the perspective of anthropology-seeks a deeper understanding of our era's most heinous crime

Ships from and sold by sellingtales. This volume―a collection of writings on genocide from the perspective of anthropology-seeks a deeper understanding of our era's most heinous crime. It asks not only what happened but why it happened. It seeks not simply to describe but to explain. And in offering an explanation of this horrendous social malady, it points the direction for a possible cure. ―Kenneth Roth, Executive Director, Human Rights Watch, from the Foreword.

Genocide is one of the most pressing issues that confronts us today. Its death toll is staggering: over one hundred million dead. Because of their intimate experience in the communities where genocide takes place, anthropologists are uniquely positioned to explain how and why this mass annihilation occurs and the types of devastation genocide causes. This ground breaking book, the first collection of original essays on genocide to be published in anthropology, explores a wide range of cases, including Nazi Germany, Cambodia, Guatemala, Rwanda, and Bosnia. Categories: Biology\Anthropology

Alexander Laban Hinton With a foreword by Kenneth Roth Human Rights Watch.

Alexander Laban Hinton With a foreword by Kenneth Roth Human Rights Watch. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRESS Berkeley. p. c. (California Series in Public Anthropology; ) Includes bibliographical references and index  (Cloth : alk. paper)  (Paper : alk. paper) . Genocide. I. Hinton, Alexander Laban.

Annihilating Difference is an anthropological collection that warrants the attention of non-anthropologists. Alexander Laban Hinton is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Rutgers University

Annihilating Difference is an anthropological collection that warrants the attention of non-anthropologists. It simultaneously adds to the growing body of knowledge about genocide and provides a revealing glimpse into what anthropologists are studying and how they are studying i. -Donald L. Horowitz, author of The Deadly Ethnic Riot. Alexander Laban Hinton is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Rutgers University. Библиографические данные.

Annihilating Difference The Anthropology of Genocide. This book represents an attempt to focus anthropological attention directly on the issue of genocide and to envision what an "anthropology of genocide" might look like. To broaden the scope of the volume, the essays examine a variety of cases (ranging from indigenous peoples to the Holocaust) and have been written from a variety of subdisciplinary backgrounds (ranging from archaeology to law).

Alexander Laban Hinton ; with a foreword by Kenneth Roth. (California Series in Public Anthropology; ) Includes bibliographical references and index.

Pathologies of Power: Structural Violence and the Assault on Health and Human Rights, by Paul Farmer. Annihilating Dierence. The Anthropology of Genocide. With a foreword by Kenneth Roth. University of california press. Alexander Laban Hinton ; with a foreword by Kenneth Roth.

By Alexander Laban Hinton . Annihilating Difference: The Anthropology of Genocide. By Alexander Laban Hinton. In "Annihilating Difference, anthropologists grapple with an urgent public issue, taking new points of view that could help understand the magnitude of past atrocities and develop strategies to prevent future massacres in the heart of humanity. -Rigoberta Menchu Tum, 1992 Nobel Peace Prize laureate. This volume-a collection of writings on genocide from the perspective of anthropology-seeks a deeper understanding of our era's most heinous crime.

Holocaust and Genocide Studies 1. (2004) 133-135 Alexander Laban Hinton has assembled fifteen essays, most presented in 1998 during a session on anthropology and genocide at a conference of the American Anthropological Association.

3 Alexander Laban Hinton.

Alexander Laban Hinton. The book is also meant as an example of how anthropology can engage with pressing public issues like genocide, about which the discipline has much to say and much remains to be said.

Genocide is one of the most pressing issues that confronts us today. Its death toll is staggering: over one hundred million dead. Because of their intimate experience in the communities where genocide takes place, anthropologists are uniquely positioned to explain how and why this mass annihilation occurs and the types of devastation genocide causes. This ground breaking book, the first collection of original essays on genocide to be published in anthropology, explores a wide range of cases, including Nazi Germany, Cambodia, Guatemala, Rwanda, and Bosnia.
Reviews:
  • Daizil
important book
  • Shalinrad
This book covers well known genocides in Rwanda, Germany, Cambodia and Guatemala. It also delves into 'lesser' 'genocides' in Bosnia and the "U.S Mexico border region". It is these dichotomies that make the book problematic. First, the introductions explain different categories of genocide. Then there is a rundown of genocides of 'indegenous' or 'first' peoples. These are well known or not, depending on ones backround. The native american genocides in the Americas are covered as is the genocide of the Herero people, and the Armenians. Also mentioned are assaults on native peoples in South East Asia and India, as well as the Sudan and Australia.

However some major assaults on people go unnoticed. For instance the ethnic cleansing of Hindus and Sikhs in Pakistan in 1948, the killing of more than 250,000 Chinese by Indonesia, and of course East Timor. Genocide is selective, not in its fact, but in how the west perceives it. Certain conflicts are not called 'genocide' becuase of Political correctness. For instance the mass slaughter of Assyrians in 1920s Iraq is not mentioned.

This is where the book breaks down. Wonderful chapters deal with post genoicde and trauma and memory in such places as post war Germany. However the foolishness that one article labels the American-Mexico border a 'potential' genoice or a place where 'genocide' terms ar eused is pure nonsense. IF this is true of the border area, then it is true of every nation in the world, and that downplays the seriousness of actual genocides like the Holocaust. if the Holocaust is 'like' the Mexican-American border region, then 'genocide' means nothing.

The Bosnian case is also suspect. Most now confirm that the 'genocide' that took place, involved perhaps 2000 civilians. ANd of course the war and the 'ethnic cleansing' terms were political aimed only at Serbs, ignoring Croat and Bosnian and Kosovar atrocities. Genocide is not war, and this is where one writer is very mistaken. failed Attempts, or thoughts of genocide, are not genocide. The Sudan is genocide, and due to lack of information not one article details it, which shows the bias of western scholarhsip and the problem with these type of texts.

Seth J. Frantzman