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Kinship Networks Among Hmong-American Refugees (New Americans) download ebook

by Julie Keown-Bomar

Kinship Networks Among Hmong-American Refugees (New Americans) download ebook
ISBN:
1593320604
ISBN13:
978-1593320607
Author:
Julie Keown-Bomar
Publisher:
LFB Scholarly Publishing LLC (January 1, 2004)
Language:
ePUB:
1673 kb
Fb2:
1991 kb
Other formats:
lrf mbr mbr doc
Category:
Social Sciences
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

Julie Keown-Bomar writes about Hmong-Americans and teaches courses in anthropology, race and ethnicity, and social problems.

Julie Keown-Bomar writes about Hmong-Americans and teaches courses in anthropology, race and ethnicity, and social problems. She has studied and lived in Inner Mongolia, China, and Kazakhstan.

Keown-Bomar explores the ways Hmong-Americans use their understandings of kinship and family to cope with personal and social disruptions caused by war, refugee flight, and relocation. She interprets these human relationships with a strong sense of realism, chronicling the strengths of Hmong kin networks and familism, as well as the tensions about gender and generational s Keown-Bomar explores the ways Hmong-Americans use their understandings of kinship and family to cope with personal and social disruptions caused by war, refugee flight, and relocation.

Kinship Networks Among Hmong-American Refugees. The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures. New York: LFB Scholarly Publishing LLC 2004:50. Ngo, Bic (2002) Contesting Culture : The Perspectives of Hmong American Female Students on Early Marriage. Anthropology and Education Quarterly 33(2):168-88. Ng, Franklin, ed. (1999) Asian American Women and Gender. New York: Garland Publishing, Inc. ^ Quincy, Keith. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux 1997:9. Corbett, C. Callister, L. Gettys, J. & Hickman, J. R. (2017).

Main Author: Keown-Bomar, Julie. Refugees Social networks United States. Hmong Americans Social networks. Kinship United States. Hmong (Asian people).

Kinship Networks Among Hmong-American Refugees. General textbook on American ethnic groups that includes a case study of a Hmong community in Wausau, Wisconsin. New York: LFB Scholarly Publishing, 2004. Thorough sociological study of Hmong immigrants. Hmong and American: Stories of Transition to a Strange Land. Another collection of Hmong immigrant narratives. The Hmong in America: Laotian Refugees in the Land of the Giants.

Hmong History and Culture. Kinship networks among Hmong-American refugees. Hmong National Development, Inc. ""The State of the Hmong American Community 2013"" (PDF). New York: LFB Scholarly Pu. 2004. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2 October 2013. Retrieved 7 July 2016.

Hmong American New Year is a community organization bridging the Hmong and America cultures, by showcasing the various cultural arts and talents. Hmong American New Years, Is a community organization bridging the Hmong Community and America, by showcasing the Hmong Arts and Crafts and Talent. Hmong American Inc. DBA Hmong American New Years Is a non-profit organization. Non-profit organisation · Community organisation. Places Saint Paul, Minnesota Community organisation Hmong American New Years - HANY About. Foss, Gwendolyn F. (2001) Maternal Sensitivity, Posttraumatic Stress, and Acculturation in Vietnamese and Hmong Mothers. The American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing 26(5):257-63. Rice, Pranee Liamputtong (2000) Hmong Women and Reproduction. Westport, CT: Bergin and Garvey.

Kinship Networks Among Hmong American Refugees. Over the last thirty years since relocation, individual Hmong refugee communities in America have evolved with varying needs and outcomes adding to their complexity and diversity in the United States. LKB Scholarly Publishing, New York.

Keown-Bomar explores the ways Hmong-Americans use their understandings of kinship and family to cope with personal and social disruptions caused by war, refugee flight, and relocation. She interprets these human relationships with a strong sense of realism, chronicling the strengths of Hmong kin networks and familism, as well as the tensions about gender and generational status. Her work demonstrates that maintenance of cultural values and practices can serve as a means to promote cultural and human survival in tumultuous times. Drawing from what Hmong refugees shared about their own adaptation experiences, Keown-Bomar provides a practical list of suggestions for building culturally responsive social services for refugees and immigrants.