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Why are We Reading Ovid's Handbook on Rape?: Teaching and Learning at a Women's College download ebook

by Madeleine Kahn

Why are We Reading Ovid's Handbook on Rape?: Teaching and Learning at a Women's College download ebook
ISBN:
1594511039
ISBN13:
978-1594511035
Author:
Madeleine Kahn
Publisher:
Routledge; 1 edition (January 17, 2006)
Language:
Pages:
198 pages
ePUB:
1501 kb
Fb2:
1636 kb
Other formats:
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Category:
Social Sciences
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.4

Young women working together in a group make surprising choices about . Why SHOULD they read Ovid? I never got a sense of Kahn's real answer (perhaps "because they can talk about it in class")

Young women working together in a group make surprising choices about what to learn, and how to go about learning it. Along the way they pose some provocative questions about how well traditional education serves women. Now, this book was published in 2005, but the students Kahn populates the book with did not seem to be from the 2000s, but from at least a decade earlier (or more ). Why SHOULD they read Ovid? I never got a sense of Kahn's real answer (perhaps "because they can talk about it in class"). But hey, I definitely think some of the 18th-c. British novels she wrote about sound fascinating, so a few new things for the reading list!

Young women working together in a group make surprising choices about what to learn, and how to go about learning it.

Young women working together in a group make surprising choices about what to learn, and how to go about learning it. Equally engaging is Kahn's own journey as she confronts questions that are fundamental to women, to teachers, to students and to parents: Why do we read? What can we teach? and What does gender have to do with it? Table of contents.

Teaching and Learning at a Women's College. By (author) Madeleine Kahn. Intimacy and Pedagogy at a Women's College 2. "Why are we reading a handbook on rape?" Ovid's Metamorphoses 3. "The female audience just isn't that big a deal. A narrative of the Life of Mrs. Charlotte Charke 4. "That wall isn't real unless I say s. Charlotte Lennox's The Female Quixote 5. "No one told me you had to be a lesbian to take this class. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter. "That wall isn't real unless I say so.

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Tell us if something is incorrect. Why Are We Reading Ovid's Handbook on Rape? Specifications. Taylor & Francis Ltd (Sales), Routledge.

By Madeleine Kahn, 1977, Published on 01/01/05. Teaching And Learning At A Women's College. Madeleine Kahn, 1977. Why Are We Reading Ovid's Handbook On Rape?: Teaching And Learning At A Women's College. Learn more about this work. This paper has been withdrawn.

Why Are We Reading Ovid's Handbook on Rape? raises feminist issues in a way that reminds people why they matter.

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Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. ISBN-13: 978-1119100737. Why is ISBN important? ISBN. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.

Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781317248996, 1317248996. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9781594511028, 1594511020. Back to Top. Get to Know Us. About VitalSource.

Peter Kahn is Educational Developer in the Centre for Lifelong Learning at the University of Liverpool.

examinations 2. A critical reading framework for empirical academic papers 2. A The UK Professional Standards Framework 2. B Areas of activity, knowledge and values within the Framework. Peter Kahn is Educational Developer in the Centre for Lifelong Learning at the University of Liverpool.

Why Are We Reading Ovid's Handbook on Rape? raises feminist issues in a way that reminds people why they matter. We eavesdrop on the vivid student characters in their hilarious, frustrating, and thought-provoking efforts to create strong and flexible selves against the background of representations of women in contemporary and classical Western literature. Young women working together in a group make surprising choices about what to learn, and how to go about learning it. Along the way they pose some provocative questions about how well traditional education serves women. Equally engaging is Kahn's own journey as she confronts questions that are fundamental to women, to teachers, to students and to parents: Why do we read? What can we teach? and What does gender have to do with it?
Reviews:
  • misery
This book does something both unique and important: it really listens to women students, and it takes them seriously. In describing her own learning experiences as a professor of English at Mills College, Madeleine Kahn is honest and open about her own anxieties and her role in her classrooms. As a result, this book has much to teach professors and teachers of fields outside of English.

Kahn's great contribution here is to recognize that young women students these days (and some not-so-young students) are reading literature and examining art with an eye to finding positive role models for themselves. Even when such an approach is patently inappropriate, as when students criticize an 18th-century actress for not being independent enough, it is so common a phenomenon that college teachers should take it into consideration when preparing to teach. I have encountered the very reactions, in my classes, that Kahn describes: women students become enraged at a female character in an ancient text for being "passive," or at the male author of a text that they consider hostile to women. They then become enraged at the teacher for giving them the objectionable text. In my experience, this sequence of events is universal in all-female classes (which can occur even at co-ed institutions). But I have learned that women students, even in co-ed classes, have strong and hostile reactions to literary depictions of sexual abuse and exploitation, and they don't hesitate to aim their hostility at their instructors (probably more at female teachers than at male teachers).

Kahn shows, painstakingly, with sympathy and humor, how she learned to maneuver through these very personal, motivated readings, and how she learned from them. Her open-ness to learning from her students, and her readiness to be challenged by them, allowed lively, challenging, and exciting discussions. She also demonstrates that these students brought out new and useful insights into some very old works of literature, precisely because of their almost overwhelming tendency to identify personally with the female characters in these texts. Further, she shows how many of the questions and issues raised by her students are the very questions addressed by complex, sophisticated literary theory: how can a woman "read" male-centric texts? Is the author responsible for every reader's reaction?

Highly recommended for anyone who teaches the kinds of literature that deals with issues of gender, violence, and other disturbing subjects.
  • Pruster
Madeleine Kahn invites readers behind the scenes of a college class to discover how a teacher teaches. Readers learn her goals, her methods, and how actual classroom reaction alters planning. It's a Must Read for those planning a teaching career; Kahn reminds us what the teacher's job really is and how to bend without losing sight of the real goals.

Literature is her field, but any teacher will learn from this insightful book.
  • Flathan
Kahn speaks matter-of-factly about her experiences teaching literature to the students of Mills College. She is very open and specific when relating the events that lead up to and after her classes. Revelations about her teaching, purpose in the classroom, and relationship to her students are clearly related in concrete description.

Kahn spends a significant amount of time in her text addressing ethical issues in practice. She speaks of the responsibility she bears as the teacher of the class, the power that that role automatically assumes and the importance of not misusing that power. Kahn also includes specific class discussions in which her students questioned her power and/or tested it and she describes her responses in detail.

Of course the most pronounced voice is that of Kahn. The text is told from the first-person perspective and intentionally invites the reader to participate in the dialogue she is offering by positioning the reader as both "teacher" and "student" in her examples. She states "your participation in this book will be, like my experiences of my own classes, usually engaging, at times confusing, often startling, and ultimately thought provoking" (Kahn, 2005, pg. 6). In addition to Kahn, the composite students have a voice and they are represented through 10 years of her classroom notes. A particular strength of this text is the fact that Kahn avoids specialized language. Although she speaks about teaching and teaching literature, she does not load her text with vocabulary that represents pedagogy or critical theory. The entire text is a reflection of the practice of teaching and specifically, teaching literature. Kahn provides specific examples in which she describes various teaching techniques she utilized.

The interests of Dr. Kahn are served by the text as she able to express the questions that emerged in her years of teaching at Mills College, as well as her feelings and understanding of how those questions impacted not only herself but her classes. Her text is also serving other teachers whether they teach only women or both sexes. Kahn's descriptions and insights into her own experiences resonate and represent examples of common experiences. Mills College seems to be served by the work of Dr. Kahn as well. Students are represented in a positive light, struggling to understand who they are, how their education will serve them and what the connection is between them and the texts they are reading.

The models of practice used by Dr. Kahn are not ratified in any way. She clearly admits to experimenting with her classes in an effort to understand the issues that they are bringing up during discussion. However, once she saw the results of not controlling the discussion and allowing students to express their thoughts, even those seemingly too personal as a result of the texts under examination, Kahn continued to follow this "model" she saw emerging.

Dr. Kahn presents in the text that the model created and practiced is not an individual act but a group one. Without her students contributing, voicing their opinions and sharing their experiences, her insights regarding the importance for female students to speak out and think critically would not exist. The contribution that Kahn's text makes to the understanding and realization of democratic forms and processes is that it openly advocates that female students typically don't feel as if they have a voice and more importantly, "at women's colleges we think about women-it is crucial to what my students learn about themselves and about the roles they might crate for themselves" (Kahn, 2005, pg. 4). In learning about themselves, these women create "new and provocative versions of the books we have discussed, along with new possibilities for both teaching and learning in collaboration" (Kahn, 2005, pg. 6).

Kahn, Madeleine Dr. (2005). Why Are We Reading Ovid's Handbook on Rape?: Teaching and Learning at a Women's College. Boulder, Paradigm Publishers.