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Alone in the Mainstream: A Deaf Woman Remembers Public School (Deaf Lives) download ebook

by Gina A. Oliva

Alone in the Mainstream: A Deaf Woman Remembers Public School (Deaf Lives) download ebook
ISBN:
1563683008
ISBN13:
978-1563683008
Author:
Gina A. Oliva
Publisher:
Gallaudet University Press; 1st edition (April 30, 2004)
Language:
Pages:
224 pages
ePUB:
1361 kb
Fb2:
1150 kb
Other formats:
docx mbr lit lrf
Category:
Social Sciences
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.7

Alone in the Mainstream book.

Alone in the Mainstream book.

Alone in the Mainstream recounts Oliva's story, as well as those of many other solitaries. In writing this important book, Oliva combined her personal experiences with responses from the Solitary Mainstream Project, a survey that she conducted of deaf and hard of hearing adults who attended public school.

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The author describes her life and experiences as the only deaf child in her public schools. Gina A. Oliva is Professor in the Physical Education and Recreation Department at Gallaudet University.

In spite of its evolution on the road to publication, my book, Alone in the Mainstream: A Deaf Woman .

In spite of its evolution on the road to publication, my book, Alone in the Mainstream: A Deaf Woman Remembers Public School, remained a crack dweller. It is a story not just about my life but also about the lives of sixty other people who themselves were the only deaf or hard of hearing child in their K-12 schools. The following is from chapter 7, "The Best of Both Worlds": Justin was eight and Jessica was six when I married their father, Rick, in 1992. They are now adults, and I count them as dear to me.

Alone in the Mainstream is author Gina Oliva's story of her personal experiences being the only hard of. .Deaf Child Crossing by Marlee Matlin Megan is excited when Cindy moves into her neighborhood - maybe she''ll finally have a best friend.

Alone in the Mainstream is author Gina Oliva's story of her personal experiences being the only hard of hearing child in the entire school. Publisher: Gallaudet University Press. Sure enough, the two girls quickly become inseparable.

When Gina Oliva first went to school in 1955, she didnâ?™t know that she was .

When Gina Oliva first went to school in 1955, she didnâ?™t know that she was â?œdifferent. ? If the kindergarten teacher played a tune on the piano to signal the next exercise, Oliva didnâ?™t react because she couldnâ?™t hear the music. Alone in the Mainstream recounts Olivaâ?™s story, as well as those of many other solitaries.

Alone in the Mainstream A Deaf Woman Remembers Public School

Alone in the Mainstream A Deaf Woman Remembers Public School. Inner Lives of Deaf Children: Interviews and Analysis. Still I Rise: The Enduring Legacy of Black Deaf Arkansans Before and After Integration. Going to Deaf Schools or club for very first time, Establishment of Deaf schools and clubs, Development of ASL, Histories like 1817 ad 1760 in France, Encounters with oppressive hearing people, and Triumphs over them. ASL Literature: Storytelling. The Star Spangled Banner" and Gallaudet's Bison Fight Song.

Alone in the Mainstream A Deaf Woman Remembers Public School. The First Volume in the Deaf Lives Series. When Gina Oliva first went to school in 1955, she didn’t know that she was different. If the kindergarten teacher played a tune on the piano to signal the next exercise, Oliva didn’t react because she couldn’t hear the music. Oliva is a former professor in the Department of Physical Education and Recreation at Gallaudet University.

Published: 1 January 2007.

When Gina Oliva first went to school in 1955, she didn’t know that she was “different.” If the kindergarten teacher played a tune on the piano to signal the next exercise, Oliva didn’t react because she couldn’t hear the music. So began her journey as a “solitary,” her term for being the only deaf child in the entire school. Gina felt alone because she couldn’t communicate easily with her classmates, but also because none of them had a hearing loss like hers. It wasn’t until years later at Gallaudet University that she discovered that she wasn’t alone and that her experience was common among mainstreamed deaf students. Alone in the Mainstream recounts Oliva’s story, as well as those of many other solitaries.In writing this important book, Oliva combined her personal experiences with responses from the Solitary Mainstream Project, a survey that she conducted of deaf and hard of hearing adults who attended public school. Oliva matched her findings with current research on deaf students in public schools and confirmed that hearing teachers are ill-prepared to teach deaf pupils, they don’t know much about hearing loss, and they frequently underestimate deaf children. The collected memories in Alone in the Mainstream add emotional weight to the conviction that students need to be able to communicate freely, and they also need peers to know they are not alone.

Reviews:
  • Felolune
Parents of deaf/hh children, educational staff, medical professionals should read this....
  • Vuzahn
This book arrived a few days early . It was in better condition than expected and came with a nice protective covering. A great read! Definitely recommended .
  • GoodLike
I have just started reading this book. So far it is quite interesting and educational in how we misinterprete others that are Deaf or have some other disability.
  • Wild Python
I am reading this book for an ASL class, and I love it! It is well written and very insightful about Deaf culture. There are compelling stories that help me to understand what it's like to be deaf in a hearing world.
  • Mr_Jeйson
I'm sorry, but this book was really boring. There was some good info for people wanting to learn about deaf culture, but it's just a slog to get through.
  • Narim
This quarter I had the amazing opportunity to take Brenda Brueggemann's class "The Disability Experience in the Contemporary World" at The Ohio State University. She encouraged me to read this book (that she happened to be the editor of), and I can't thank her enough! While at times I felt this book was a bit redundant, I think that is just a stylistic choice; it is Oliva's way of reiterating the profound impact these specific events had on her life. Personally, I agreed to read this book because I felt as a future teacher it is crucial for me to be aware of current issues and debates in education. I really feel all of the points addressed by Alone in the Mainstream are very real concerns that need to be considered by everyone involved. As a result, I would highly recommend this book to any educator; past, present, and especially future. The future of these highly capable students is dependent on the educational opportunities, and it is the responsibility of educators to be as informed and knowledgeable as we possibly can. While we can't turn back the hands of time and erase the painful experiences expressed by Oliva and others throughout the book, it is my hope that we can take actively work to create the possibility of a brighter future for d/Deaf and hard of hearing students. They have a lot to say about this issue, and it is time to stop and "listen."
  • Haal
I'm a hearing person doing research on technology for deaf education and this book was really helpful for me to get a glimpse into the Deaf experience. That being said, I feel the book's title is misleading, in particular the subtitle. This book isn't really about the author "remembering" her life in public school. Oliva took a sabbatical from her work at Gallaudet University and spent the time collecting the insights and stories of several deaf individuals that had been mainstreamed in public schools. This book represents Oliva's attempt to present what she found, but there's not really a narrative structure to the book which is what I was hoping for. Instead you get view points of several individuals remembering their best teacher, their worst teacher, thoughts on "disclosure" (a concept I wasn't familiar with before reading the book), the social aspects of being the only deaf student in school, etc. I don't think this is necessarily a bad thing, in fact I would suspect it makes the book a better resource for educators who have a DHH student in their classroom for the first time.
Alone in the Mainstrain sensitively relates the experiences of the author growing up a hearing impaired child mainstreamed into the hearing world. Reaching out to others who have been similarly mainstreamed she presents a study of the effects of the mainstreaming experience on other deaf and hard of hearing people. Teachers and parents of both deaf and hard of hearing, as well as hearing, children would learn much from reading Oliva's combination autobiography/study. Frankly, I found it surprising how little I was aware of the social isolation experienced by a non-hearing person in a hearing environment. Oliva discusses how those individuals with a cochlear implant can still experience isolation in a room filled with many sounds

Oliva advocates giving deaf children opportunities to be a part of both the deaf and hearing worlds. Through examples from her own rich life, she shows ways in which one can intertwine the two. I recommend this excellent book both as general autobiography and as an insightful study of the effects of mainstreaming, told by those most qualified to comment, those who have experienced it.