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Resource Management in Developing Countries: Africa's Ecological and Economic Problems download ebook

by Valentine U. James

Resource Management in Developing Countries: Africa's Ecological and Economic Problems download ebook
ISBN:
0897892275
ISBN13:
978-0897892278
Author:
Valentine U. James
Publisher:
Praeger (May 23, 1991)
Language:
Pages:
168 pages
ePUB:
1429 kb
Fb2:
1138 kb
Other formats:
azw doc mobi lrf
Category:
Social Sciences
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.8

Focusing on Africa, James explains the reasons for the continent's declining resource base from historical, geographical, economic, and poli Designed as a text for undergraduate and graduate level courses in Third World development, Resource Management in Developing.

Focusing on Africa, James explains the reasons for the continent's declining resource base from historical, geographical, economic, and poli Designed as a text for undergraduate and graduate level courses in Third World development, Resource Management in Developing Countries takes an interdisciplinary approach to the problem of resource management in developing countries.

book by Valentine Udoh James

Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

Resource Management in Developing Countries: Africa's Ecological and Economic Problems. Policy Adjustment in Africa: Case Studies in Economic Development. By Valentine U. James. New York: Bergin & Garvey 1991. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1992. By Victori S. Lockwood. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1993.

Despite, Africa possesses wealthy natural resources many Africans live in. .

Despite, Africa possesses wealthy natural resources many Africans live in poverty unable to benefit from the African wealth because of uneven distribution across the continent and partly because of African complicated history over the past 50 years after the decolonization. Sub-Saharan states of Africa are right the countries, where environmental problems are first on the agenda. Environmental problems of sub-Saharan Africa also include air and water pollution, deforestation, loss of soil and soil fertility, and a dramatic decline in biodiversity throughout the region. nest paragraphs will face the problems in more details.

Africa's ecological and economic problems. by James, Valentine Udoh. Published in New York. Management, Africa, Natural resources. There's no description for this book yet. Bibliography: p. -151. 6. The Physical Object.

South Africa is currently promoting environmental management policy which ensures the Growth Employment and Redistribution Strategy (GEA).

Among all the developing countries, population growth remains one of the reasons for these countries to remain poor. To take specific examples, both India and China have historically been among the poorer countries because of their huge populations. It was only after the economic liberalisation and opening up of their respective economies that these countries began on a growth trajectory similar to that of the developed countries. Governmental Efforts to Combat Population Growth.

The character of global economic problems is defined by the fact that they encompass the whole of the global .

The character of global economic problems is defined by the fact that they encompass the whole of the global economy, which formed in the 20th century.

Designed as a text for undergraduate and graduate level courses in Third World development, Resource Management in Developing Countries takes an interdisciplinary approach to the problem of resource management in developing countries. Focusing on Africa, James explains the reasons for the continent's declining resource base from historical, geographical, economic, and political perspectives, and illustrates the links among all these factors. He explores key resource management issues such as threats to ecological systems, water quality management and agricultural production, using case studies where appropriate to illustrate the decline in biological diversity and human potential, the political and economic instability, and the socio-cultural decay that contribute to Africa's resource management problems. James argues that Africa's great loss of natural resources is due to mismanagement by African leaders, multinationals, and colonial governments, and suggests possible solutions to this declining trend.

The introductory chapter examines Africa's legacy of colonialism. The author next addresses threats to the continent's ecological systems and the impact of transnational firms on resource management. After describing specific resource bases: water, soils, river systems, and forests, James then compares and contrasts Africa's urban and rural differences-- using Nigeria as a case example. Subsequent chapters discuss the need for proper resource management, perceptions of resource management problems in Africa, likely future scenarios, and the resource management programs currently underway in Africa. James concludes that governments and private and international organizations must assist the African countries in efforts to save endangered species, protect forest and other resources, and provide an acceptable standard of living for the people. Students of planning, as well as policymakers in developing countries, will find this comprehensive treatment of the ecological consequences of various resource management policies in the Third World very informative.