cerkalo
» » Black Ice: The Invisible Threat of Cyber-Terrorism

Black Ice: The Invisible Threat of Cyber-Terrorism download ebook

by Dan Verton

Black Ice: The Invisible Threat of Cyber-Terrorism download ebook
ISBN:
0072227877
ISBN13:
978-0072227871
Author:
Dan Verton
Publisher:
McGraw-Hill Osborne Media; 1 edition (August 19, 2003)
Language:
Pages:
304 pages
ePUB:
1724 kb
Fb2:
1265 kb
Other formats:
lrf lrf mobi txt
Category:
Politics & Government
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

The new face of orism-is all too clear. Before 9-11 This Book might not be looked at the same way it is today

The new face of orism-is all too clear. Gone are the days when the only victims are those who are unfortunate enough to be standing within striking distance of the blast. Today's terrorists have learned that America's national security depends upon its computer- and network-dependent infrastructure. Before 9-11 This Book might not be looked at the same way it is today. Black Ice :The Invisible Threat of Cyber Terrororism brings around many misconceptions why an attack on our most important infrastructure could be carried out by Terrorists and not an Impossibilty.

Internet security expert Dan Verton investigates how cyber-terrorism could occur, what the global and financial . Before 9-11 This Book might not be looked at the same way it is today

Internet security expert Dan Verton investigates how cyber-terrorism could occur, what the global and financial implications are, the impact this is having and will continue to have on privacy and civil liberties, and how to prepare and prevent against cyber-terrorism. While This Book deals mostly with What if Scenerios, It also makes you think of things you thought were impossible.

Written by former . intelligence officer Dan Verton, Black Ice: The Invisible Threat of Cyber-Terrorism investigates how cyber-terrorism could occur, what the global and financial implications are, the impact this has on privacy and civil liberties, and how to prepare for and prevent cyber attacks.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Black Ice: The Invisible Threat of Cyber-Terrorism as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Internet security expert Dan Verton investigates how cyber-terrorism could occur, what the global and financial implications are, the impact this is having and will continue to have on privacy and civil liberties, and how to prepare and prevent against cyber-terrorism.

Dan Verton, journalist and author of The Hacker Diaries: Confessions of Teenage Hackers, has written a very enlightening book in Black Ice: The Invisible Threat of Cyber-Terrorism. The book begins with a fictitious attack that is multi-faceted and very well orchestrated

Dan Verton, journalist and author of The Hacker Diaries: Confessions of Teenage Hackers, has written a very enlightening book in Black Ice: The Invisible Threat of Cyber-Terrorism. The book begins with a fictitious attack that is multi-faceted and very well orchestrated. While it is somewhat sensationalist or alarmist, the point of the story is to show what is possible- not probable. Verton illustrates how cyber-attacks against key communications and critical infrastructure sites can be used in conjunction with conventional attacks to maximize the ensuing damage and confusion.

The first book to define the clear and present danger posed by a cyber-terrorist attack on the . computer- and network-dependent infrastructure. The pages are packed with interviews from members of terrorist groups, including al-Qaida, as well as key insiders involved in planning and executing the . plan for the defense of cyberspace, including Tom Ridge, James Gilmore, CIA and NSA officials-and even al-Qaeda supporters. Internet security expert Dan Verton investigates how cyber-terrorism could occur, what the global and financial implications are, the impact this is having.

The first book to define the clear and present danger posed by a cyber-terrorist attack on the U.S. computer- and network-dependent infrastructure. The pages are packed with interviews from members of terrorist groups, including al-Qaida, as well as key insiders involved in planning and executing the U.S. plan for the defense of cyberspace, including Tom Ridge, James Gilmore, CIA and NSA officials--and even al-Qaeda supporters. Internet security expert Dan Verton investigates how cyber-terrorism could occur, what the global and financial implications are, the impact this is having and will continue to have on privacy and civil liberties, and how to prepare and prevent against cyber-terrorism.
Reviews:
  • Thundershaper
HOLY CRAP - do you see the hairs standing up on arms? This is the reaction I have to reading just one of the initial scenarios illustrated in stunning details and descriptions in this book. I purchased the book as research for security from a Human Resources viewpoint working inside government contracting companies and what I got was MUCH MORE! What I now know scares the crap out of me - because I know this book was written in 2003, and there is likely MORE of a likelihood of Cyber-Terrorism on USA soil now than ever before. Computers have gotten more powerful, everyone has mobile devices hooked up to everything (and using them at local coffee-shops and cyber cafes). Hackers have gotten smarter and more creative and are using more powerful computer and IT tools to hack into systems. What is scary is that so many Corporate Execs and government officials are probably still 'naysaying' and 'poo-pooing' the idea of any cyber criminals wanting to get into their little bowls of rice. But the eight infrastructure targets listed in this book is essentially a master plan for cyber terrorists to plan their attack. (Is that good that we know where or how they can attack or bad that the terrorists can use this book as a base for planning?). Kudos to the author - I wish he would come back with an updated book with the more recent cyber terrorist threat stories and points!
I would highly recommend this book for reading - regardless of the date - because it's just a relevant now as 13 years ago!
  • Landarn
Dan has an amazing gift as a journalist and also to explain technical material in an approachable manner. I've read or been briefed on a lot of this material at one time or another, but to have it in one place, well laid out, with example after example, really helped me focus on just how vulnerable our country and my organization is. The "shock" value of this material is high, but he took no shortcuts in making his case. Buy the book, read the book, then grab your organization's disaster recovery and business continuity plans and get out your red pen. I promise you will be inspired to improve those plans.
If I had a criticism of the book it would be the ending, it is a bit too much gloom and doom. So, I propose the following alternate ending:
Each of us has the ability and the responsibility to make our environment a bit more resistant to attack. The actions we can take range from reviewing our web pages to make sure we are not giving too much information away to simply running Windows update. Don't let a week go by without doing something, anything, to strengthen your defenses.
  • Sagda
Got it as a gift
  • Voodoolkree
Before 9-11 This Book might not be looked at the same way it is today. Black Ice :The Invisible Threat of Cyber Terrororism brings around many misconceptions why an attack on our most important infrastructure could be carried out by Terrorists and not an Impossibilty. While This Book deals mostly with What if Scenerios, It also makes you think of things you thought were impossible. Take for example the sophistication of Hacking and Breaking into Our most Vital Systems. Terrorists know you must have training at a very high level and will Train Them at Schools in the U.S. Itself. Sound Familiar?

That's the sought of future thinking that this book will have you turning page after page and many ways o limit or stop a future attack on the internet. A great book with insightful information.
  • Binar
I have read this book and the reviews on Amazon.com. The author makes a good argument for enhanced cyber security in the USA. This is an issue that will be ignored by policy makers and the general public until an attack makes people pay attention to the realities of a computer controlled civilization. While other reviewers blast the writing style and hypothetical situations in the book it seems they have missed the point. It is not if a devastating cyber attack will occur, it is when.
  • Quinthy
Cyberterrorism, does it exist? A weapons-grade hype or a nightmare from the near future, which we are all soon to face? This fascinating book seeks to answer the above question by collecting and evaluating many stories during author's "6 year research" trying to piece the puzzle together.
Undoubtfully, the book is written by a journalist, thus it sometimes feels sensationalistic, "newspaperish" and fluffy. Some things (such as the "doomsday" scenario from chapter 1 and "al-Qaeda certified hackers") are "lighter" than others, but all are well-written and fun to read. At times, it feels that the author seeks to replace proving things by quoting many potentially unreliable sources talking about the thing. Thus "such and such ex-government guy said cyberterrorism is real" subtly mutates into "cyberterrorism is real!" Similarly, if a PC was discovered in some hideout or it becomes known that terrorists surfed the web, suddenly the specter of cyber-terror rises high, although the facts themselves can be interpreted in a less ominous manner.
Another subject covered extensively in the book is whether al-Qaeda is really going in the direction of cyberterror. I find the case built by the author somewhat convincing, but not completely compelling. However, if truck bombs against data storage facilities and IT infrastructure as well as EMP weapons are added to the fray (as suggested in the book), suddenly cyberattacks are not about hacking anymore and the damage potential rises dramatically.
As for the conclusion, one of the main points I realized after reading the book is that everything is modern society is so a) interdependent and b) dependent upon computers that a push applied in a certain place from within the "cyber-world" does stand a chance of wrecking something in a "real world". Thus, while cyberterrorism might remain a myth, possibilities of doing damage to physical infrastructure by purely virtual actions will grow and multiply - a scary thought indeed.
Anton Chuvakin, Ph.D., GCIA, GCIH is a Senior Security Analyst with a major information security company. His areas of infosec expertise include intrusion detection, UNIX security, forensics, honeypots, etc. In his spare time, he maintains his security portal info-secure.org