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The Culture of Lies: Antipolitical Essays (Post-Communist Cultural Studies) download ebook

by Dubravka Ugrešić

The Culture of Lies: Antipolitical Essays (Post-Communist Cultural Studies) download ebook
ISBN:
027101847X
ISBN13:
978-0271018478
Author:
Dubravka Ugrešić
Publisher:
Penn State University Press (September 3, 1998)
Language:
Pages:
288 pages
ePUB:
1299 kb
Fb2:
1322 kb
Other formats:
mobi lit lrf mbr
Category:
Politics & Government
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.9

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It shows us the banality and brutality of nationalism and the way that nationalistic ideology permeates every pore of life. has been added to your Cart.

The Culture of Lies book. In exchange I was given a new homeland, far The Culture of Lies by Dubravka Ugrešić is a book of essays written between 1991 and 1996 - that is, during and just after the wars that resulted from the collapse of Yugoslavia. It is my book from Croatia for the Read The World challenge, although there is a slight awkwardness to that choice.

The Culture of Lies is a volume of essays on ordinary lives in a time of war .

The Culture of Lies is a volume of essays on ordinary lives in a time of war, nationalism and collective paranoia. Dubravka Ugrešić received several major awards for her essays, including Charles Veillon Prize, Heinrich Mann Prize, Jean Amery Prize. In America, Karaoke Culture was shortlisted for National Book Critic Circle Award. Dubravka Ugrešić is also a literary scholar who has published articles on Russian avant-garde literature, and a scholarly book on Russian contemporary fiction Nova ruska proza (New Russian Fiction).

Gordana P. Crnkovic and others published The Culture of Lies: Antipolitical Essays .

It is argued that ethnic studies in general would gain much by paying more attention to nuances than by relying on ethnonyms as if they were clear-cut concepts. The cultural diversity of former Yugoslavia was emphasised in the school curriculum, rather than repressed (Ugresic, 1998, p. 31- 132). Accordingly, schools in Bosnia were ethnically integrated and followed a curriculum which, for all of its evident faults, did strive to be culturally inclusive and recognise the cultural contributions of its different ethnic groups.

Bibliographic Details  .

Bibliographic Details Publisher: . Penn State University Press. Publication Date: 1998. Dubravka Ugrešić is the author of many books, including four that have been translated into English: In the Jaws of Life and Other Stories (1993), Fording the Stream of Consciousness (1993), Have a Nice Day (1994), and The Museum of Unconditional Surrender (1998). She was awarded the prestigious Charles Veillon Prize in 1996 for The Culture of Lies. Since 1993 she has lived in exile in Amsterdam and frequently lectures in the United States. In exchange I was given a new homeland/ Identity: The Culture of Lies by Dubravka Ugrešić is a book of essays written between 1991 and 1996 - that is, during and just after the wars that resulted from the collapse of Yugoslavia.

According to Dubravka Ugrešić the term . Communist nostalgia, similar phenomena elsewhere. The Culture of Lies: Antipolitical Essays. Remembering Utopia: The Culture of Everyday Life in Socialist Yugoslavia. New Academia Publishing, LLC. ISBN 978-844062-3-4.

Yugoslavism after Yugoslavia. Tito impersonator in Skopje, Macedonia, in 2018. Pennsylvania State University Press. p. 231. ISBN 0-271-01847-X.

In a more recent essay, from 2010’s Karaoke Culture, we see that Ugresic still regards being expelled for speaking the truth . The Culture of Lies cites a lovely passage from Osip Mandelstam about these boredom-busters: A writer is a bastard, a cross between a parrot and a priest

In a more recent essay, from 2010’s Karaoke Culture, we see that Ugresic still regards being expelled for speaking the truth as a humiliation, an open wound, not something of which she is proud. The Culture of Lies cites a lovely passage from Osip Mandelstam about these boredom-busters: A writer is a bastard, a cross between a parrot and a priest. He is a parrot in the most literal sense of the word. If his master is a Frenchman he will speak French, but when he is sold in Persia he will say in Persian: ‘Polly is a nutcase’ or ‘Polly wants a cracker’.

The Culture of Lies is one of the most intelligent and lucid accounts of an appalling episode in history. It shows us the banality and brutality of nationalism and the way that nationalistic ideology permeates every pore of life. Ugrešić's acerbic and penetrating essays cover everything from politics to daily routine, from public to private life.

With a diverse and unusual perspective, she writes about memory, soap operas, the destruction of everyday life, kitsch, the conformity of intellectuals, propaganda and censorship, the strategies of human manipulation and the walls of Europe which, she argues, never really did fall.

Shot through with irony and sadness, satirical protest and bitter melancholy, The Culture of Lies is a gesture of intellectual resistance by a writer branded 'a traitor' and 'a witch’ in Croatia.

Reviews:
  • Qag
Dubravka Ugresic is perhaps less well-known in the English-speaking world than the other Croatian "dissident" writer Slavenka Drakulic, which is unfortunate. Both Ugresic's essays and especially fiction are far superior to that of Drakulic. "Culture of Lies" includes the author's observations of Croatian society and politics of the last ten years, both of which have been none too kind to her (indeed, while achieving great acclaim in other European countries, she was branded a "traitor" and worse by Croatian politicians and the pro-regime press for her uncompromising criticism of Croatian nationalism, etc.). In this book, Ugresic shows the many ways in which nationalism imbued all levels of society in Croatia, making people increasingly hostile to different views and people who were/are "different." Her particular area of interest is the way this was reflected in the behavior of intellectuals, who-at least one would like to think-are not supposed to be as susceptible to the appeal of God-and-country patriotism and nationalistic kitsch. Her description of an incident in a Zagreb tram, in which a young man accosts and beats an old destitute drunken man, is particularly vivid and sadly indicative. In fact, this whole section of the book, called "Souvenirs from Paradise" is an excellent collection of impressions and observations of the underside of Croatian life. Despite the recent sweeping political changes in Croatia, many of the negative aspects of society in this country as described by Ugresic are still here, and they will haunt this country for some time to come.
  • Wymefw
Although it has taken the English translation of this collection of essays a few years to come into print (it was first published in Dutch),this is a highly relevant, illuminating, and moving book. Most of the essays were written between '92 and '94, with more recent postscripts. With rare clarity and complexity of thought, gift of articulation, emotional courage and absence of pretence or squeamishness, Ugresic has carried out a highly accessible investigation into the Yugoslav war, the demise of communist Europe, the East-West polarity, the ambiguities of exile. With references to other East European writers and thinkers (Milan Kundera, Miroslav Krleja, Danilo Kis, Josiph Brodsky), she explores the tyranny of the new constructs of national identity in the Balkan states, the enforced collective amnesia of the former Yugoslavs, the many traumas of their history, as well as the common psycho-cultural lanscape of the 'Eastern block'. There are many deeply moving episodes and revealing insights here, delivered in the familiar 'Central European' style of ironic, melancholic, bitter humanism. Vaguely reminiscent of Milan Kundera, only better because of the lack of smugness and the final doubting humility of someone who has felt intense pain and articulated the nature of this pain.
  • krot
This well-written book gives keen insight to events surrounding the dissolution of Yugoslavia while providing a view into the collective mind of former Yugoslavians. This book also makes one wonder about how nationalism is used, for better or worse, in other countries as a political vehicle to motivate its people to support specific ideals. While I agree with Ugresic's criticism of nationalism and the role it plays in post-Yugoslavian times, I also wonder if it is just a collective defense-mechanism, a means for survival when collective identity is being shattered. It is a fascinating read, well-written, and illuminating on many different levels.