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Assassination in Algiers: Churchill, Roosevelt, De Gaulle, and the Murder of Admiral Darlan download ebook

by Anthony Verrier

Assassination in Algiers: Churchill, Roosevelt, De Gaulle, and the Murder of Admiral Darlan download ebook
ISBN:
0393028283
ISBN13:
978-0393028287
Author:
Anthony Verrier
Publisher:
W W Norton & Co Inc; 1st edition (March 1, 1991)
Language:
Pages:
302 pages
ePUB:
1598 kb
Fb2:
1831 kb
Other formats:
docx azw lit doc
Category:
Politics & Government
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on June 25, 2015. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

The murder of Petainist Admiral Darlan in Algiers on December 24, 1942 by Fernand Bonnier was the culmination of a chain of events that began with the surrender of France to Hitler in 1940

The murder of Petainist Admiral Darlan in Algiers on December 24, 1942 by Fernand Bonnier was the culmination of a chain of events that began with the surrender of France to Hitler in 1940. British journalist Verrier uses interviews along with both published and unpublished primary sources to reconstruct these events and to assess Churchill and Roosevelt's policies toward Vichy France. Verrier shows that from 1940 on Churchill was doggedly committed to DeGaulle as a "unifying leader" of free France. Roosevelt, for tactical reasons, pursued a policy of accommodation with Vichy

book by Anthony Verrier. Behind the mystery of Admiral Darlan's presence in Algiers in November 1942 was a conflict between Franklin D. Roosevelt and Winston Churchill on which hung the fate of France

book by Anthony Verrier. Roosevelt and Winston Churchill on which hung the fate of France. Darlan in fact was involved in a plan to keep Petain's Vichy government in power as a counter to the growing streangth of Communism. When the terms of the plan was revealed, they shocked all those in Britain, France, and the United States who were backing Charles de Gaulle.

Assassination In Algiers book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Physical description; ; 24cm  . Start by marking Assassination In Algiers: Churchill, Roosevelt, De Gaulle, And The Murder Of Admiral Darlan as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Home Verrier, Anthony ASSASSINATION IN ALGIERS : CHURCHILL, ROOSEVELT, DE GAULLE .

Home Verrier, Anthony ASSASSINATION IN ALGIERS : CHURCHILL, ROOSEVELT, DE GAULLE, AND. Assassination in algiers : churchill, roosevelt, de gaulle, and the murder of admiral darlan. Roosevelt supported the collaborationist Vichy regime, represented in Algiers by Admiral Jean-Francois Darlan, and refused to recognize the Free French movement under General deGaulle-while Churchill, who considered Darlan "an odious Quisling," supported the Free French. Churchill's position was further complicated by FDR's determination to represent TORCH as an all-American effort.

Assassination in Algiers: Churchill, Roosevelt, DeGaulle & the Murder of Admiral Darlan (1990). Williams, Charles, Pétain, Little Brown (Time Warner Book Group UK), London, 2005, p. 206

Assassination in Algiers: Churchill, Roosevelt, DeGaulle & the Murder of Admiral Darlan (1990). 206, ISBN 978-0-316-86127-4.

VERRIER, ANTHONY (Author) Macmillan (Publisher). Visit of general de gaulle and admiral muselier to a naval port. How has war in the air changed over time? KS3-4.

French politician Charles de Gaulle had a colourful career including over 30 assassination attempts that involved . De Gaulle and his wife ducked and the driver was able to accelerate out of a front-wheel skid thanks to the car’s suspension system.

French politician Charles de Gaulle had a colourful career including over 30 assassination attempts that involved lots of Citröen cars, napalm bombs, the CIA and lucky chauffeurs. The group had tried to kill him because they thought de Gaulle had betrayed France after he accepted Algerian independence. They were the last ever people to be killed in France by firing squad for their crime. Incidentally, de Gaulle forever loved his Citröen after that.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt. François Darlan (Admiral). Assassination of François Darlan (1942-12-24).

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Assassination in Algiers Churchill Roosevelt De. .Good Condition: A book that has been read, but is in good condition

Good Condition: A book that has been read, but is in good condition. Minimal damage to the book cover eg. scuff marks, but no holes or tears. If this is a hard cover, the dust jacket may be missing. Binding has minimal wear. The majority of pages are undamaged with some creasing or tearing, and pencil underlining of text, but this is minimal.

Discusses the conflicts between the Allies over Vichy rule in North Africa and how they led to the death of Admiral Darlan
Reviews:
  • Darksinger
I found this to be a superbly researched and very well written book. Mr Verrier deftly examines the facts surrounding the assassination of Jean-Francois Darlan, the French Vichy leader in North Africa in 1942 at the height of World War Two.

Students of French, Algerian history, particularly with regard to colonization and the rise of insurgency in that nation (and its gradual and violent transformation to independence), will likely find this a fascinating read. Verrier also presents his findings in a compelling narrative, such that it reads almost like a John le Carre novel than a work of non-fiction.

Kudos to Mr. Verrier for his diligence in research and hiw writing style. I definitely recommend this book.
  • Getaianne
I bought this book 13 years ago. It's been sitting around ever since. It's not that I wasn't interested in the topic: rather the opposite actually. I just never got around to reading it. I'm almost a collector of obscure and unnoticed events from World War II and from warfare in general. The assassination of Admiral Francois Darlan on Christmas Eve 1942 is one of those events that gets mentioned in history books, but usually without much elaboration beyond that it happened, and that Darlan's death cleared the field for de Gaulle, who wound up leading the Free Frech movement unchallenged. Darlan was Marshal Petain's deputy in the Vichy French government for a while, and then contrived to be in North Africa when the Allies launched Operation Torch and overran the place. He convinced the Allies (notably Eisenhower's protege General Mark Clark, and his diplomatic deputy Robert Murphy) that he was the only person who could provide stability in North Africa, and began ruling the provinces in the name of Marshal Petain, still in metropolitan France, and soon a guest of Hitler. Darlan was a shady character, an admiral who wound up being best known for his political maneuvering, and his flexible ethics--within the same year he met Hitler and pledged support to the Third Reich, and then met Eisenhower and pledged support to the Allied cause--made him a slippery character at best, and one the Allies knew they couldn't trust. His death benefited the Allies in general (though the Americans, according to the author, weren't aware of it at the time) and De Gaulle in particular, leaving him an almost completely clear field in his run for leadership of the Fighting French movement.

This book is an examination of Darlan's killing, and the events that led up to it. While this subject is fascinating to me, the book itself is so poorly written it's almost impenetrable. Verrier supposedly was a journalist at one point, but you have to wonder: if he was a journalist, did he forget how to write? Or perhaps the publication he wrote for preferred the prose in their publication so dense as to defy understanding? I don't know. One way or the other, what we get here is so unreadable I found myself falling asleep, something I virtually never do when reading a book.

This isn't helped any by the author's premise, which is (near as I can tell) that many people benefited from Darlan's passing, but none of them beyond his killer had much to do with his death. There's much discussion of various individuals telling one another that "Darlan must be eliminated" and then the author follows that with a notation that there's no evidence the individual had anything to do with the assassination. Verrier goes into excruciating detail discussing the various machinations that Darlan went through as he attempted to gain control, first of North Africa, and then of metripolitan France once the Allies liberated it. Apparently he sensed that Roosevelt would want someone pliable to run France when the Americans were occupying a large part of the country, and imagined that he might fulfill that role, edging from it into a real leadership position in the country. The author makes it clear that as far as he's concerned, it was very unlikely that such a thing would have happened. He quotes several Fighting French officialas who insisted that if the Americans tried to install some sort of government in France, with Darlan at its head, this would lead to a civil war in France. Apparently no one else at the time thought it a good idea either, other than some of the Americans who almost instinctively disliked de Gaulle at first sight. The author follows the various principles through a series of conspiracies, misunderstandings, arguments, disagreements, negotiations, betrayals, and other interactions that would be bewildering in any case: with Verrier at the helm, the whole things virtually incomprehensible.

I was looking forward to this book, and frankly I was very disappointed with it. The information it provides isn't earth-shattering in any fashion, though some of the details of the various diplomatic maneuvers might be of interest to a specialist. The writing kills any enjoyment anyone might get from the book. I know history isn't written primarily for entertainment, but I'm reminded of Barbara Tuchman's observation that if history is so poorly written that no one reads it, it does no one any good.

One last thing: this book has numerous quotes included in the text in French. It really detracted from my understanding of the book. After finishing the book I found a section at the back headed "Translations". I've never seen this before, didn't know to look for it, and find it awkward. If anyone else reads the book, you should be aware this section is here before you start.
  • Froststalker
I fully second Mr. Nicholas's review. The subject matter is interesting, especially for me, since my wife and I retired to Morocco (Rabat) nearly two years ago. The writing is awkward and sleep-provoking. I have read perhaps fifty pages of the book so far. I am not sure I will have the stamina to finish it.