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Crimes Against Humanity: The Struggle for Global Justice download ebook

by Geoffrey Robertson

Crimes Against Humanity: The Struggle for Global Justice download ebook
ISBN:
1565845978
ISBN13:
978-1565845978
Author:
Geoffrey Robertson
Publisher:
New Pr (May 1, 2000)
Language:
Pages:
553 pages
ePUB:
1543 kb
Fb2:
1917 kb
Other formats:
lrf doc mbr mobi
Category:
Politics & Government
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.8

Geoffrey Robertson's "Crimes Against Humanity" is a thoughtful and thorough analysis of modern attempts at global justice. I have struggled with this issue for some time and have found most books of little help, perhaps because the amount of material to be digested is so substantial.

Geoffrey Robertson's "Crimes Against Humanity" is a thoughtful and thorough analysis of modern attempts at global justice. Robertson does an excellent job of assembling, organizing, and presenting an extremely complex body of knowledge. There are many books on individual topics covered here and some readers would no doubt like their pet topics to have been discussed in more detail.

When it was first published in 1999, Crimes Against Humanity called for a radical shift from diplomacy to justice in international affairs. Since then, fearsome figures such as Charles Taylor, Laurent Gbagbo, and Ratko Mladic have been tried in international criminal court, and a global movement has rallied around the human rights framework of justice.

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His book Crimes against Humanityhas been an inspiration for the global justice movement, and he is the author of an. .

His book Crimes against Humanityhas been an inspiration for the global justice movement, and he is the author of an acclaimed memoir, The Justice Game, and the textbook Media Law. He is married to Kathy Lette. He has handled hundreds of death sentence appeals; prosecuted Hastings Banda and defended Salman Rushdie; acted for terrorist suspects at the Old Bailey and for Human Rights Watch in the proceedings against General Pinochet.

Rev. ed. of: Crimes against humanity, Geoffrey Robertson. Includes bibliographical references and index.

Crimes Against Humanity: the Struggle for Global Justice. by Geoffrey Robertson. When it was first published in 1999, Crimes Against Humanity called for a radical shift from diplomacy to justice in international affairs.

He shows how human rights standards can be enforced against cruel governments, armies and multi-national corporations.

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Explains how the identification of a crime against humanity, first defined at Nuremburg, has become the key that unlocks the closed door of state sovereignty and that holds political leaders responsible for the evils they visit upon humankind.
Reviews:
  • Chi
Geoffrey Robertson's "Crimes Against Humanity" is a thoughtful and thorough analysis of modern attempts at global justice. I have struggled with this issue for some time and have found most books of little help, perhaps because the amount of material to be digested is so substantial. Robertson does an excellent job of assembling, organizing, and presenting an extremely complex body of knowledge. There are many books on individual topics covered here and some readers would no doubt like their pet topics to have been discussed in more detail. The beauty of the book, however, is not in its detailed coverage of any single issue, but in it ability to integrate a large number of topics (e.g., the Lieber Code, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights,The Geneva Conventions, Nuremberg, Truth Commissions, International Criminal Court, etc.). The author is able to show how these various issues are connected in a string of advances toward a global system of human rights -- advances that are admittedly glacial in their pace but advances nonetheless. Anyone who has tried to organize this vast body of knowledge can appreciate what Robertson has accomplshed. A fine companion to this book is Samantha Power's book "A Problem From Hell: America and the Age of Genocide." Taken together, these two books will take the reader a long way toward understanding international efforts at global justice.
  • Gandree
Now in its third edition, this mainstay textbook on the subject just keeps getting bigger, and one might say better. Whereas in earlier editions, the author was known to write in a somewhat dry, analytical tone, with some excellent categorical or structural analysis, I might add, the tone is now almost conversational, with the author telling "the story of human rights." The "story" pervades the first five or six chapters, and consists of little snippets or witty comments lamenting the fact that someone didn't do this or that. The meaty stuff includes chapter 8 (the Pinochet case), chapter 9 (the Milosvic case), chapter 11 (Kosovo), and chapter 13 (the last chapter, on Saddam Hussein). There is only one chapter on terrorism (12) and it's mostly devoted to the Guantanamo Bay issue. Overall, the book may be essential reading, and it does make the complex simple, but it is an overview book and the kind of thing which is sufficient only for beginners because there are lots of areas where the reader might want to do some more research and all they are given are little snippets or emotive hints of something.
  • 6snake6
Geoffrey Robertson is a passionate advocate of human rights - and (possibly paradoxically) of the ability to affect them within the system/s in which we try to enforce them. This book makes no claim to be a perfect history, but knowing Robertson's experience, we are better to hear his opinion and understanding than a dry history of the progress of human rights law itself. If you love this book, good. If you hate it, good. The idea is to make you think about it... and that is what Robertson is best at. This may be the only law history book you will ever read which will make you laugh and cry - occasionally at the same time. I read some other reviews of this and am saddened at their negativity - Robertson has personal experience most "experts" never have, and combines that with a wicked wit, enormous intelligence and a humanitarian heart. This is some book, and Geoffrey Robertson is some man - read whatever you can of his.
  • Zehaffy
I bought this book for my university class, but I doubt we will get through it in our class, so I plan on reading it on my own, too. It's an incredibly well written book, and in a non-complex academic tone, I mean it's very smart, but I imagine a high school level or maybe even a middle school student could get into this book. Great for your home library collection. It will move you, frustrate you, inspire you, leave you hopeless and hopefull on various topics on our global issues - specifically human rigts.
  • Mr_Mix
While Mr Robertson's style can be a little heavy going somertimes, his undoubted knowedge, experience and passion for the subject shine through. This has to be one of the best books available chronicaling the current status of international human rights law at the fundemantal level- war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide etc. He pulls no punches, and develops the history and background to the current state of the law in each area with precision and without fear or favour. He analyses clearly the position of various tyrannical african leaders and their actions against their people and equally the actions of the American president in murdering his opponents with drone stirkes and places them all firmly in the framework of developed international law.