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Who Sings the Nation-State?: Language, Politics, Belonging download ebook

by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak,Judith Butler

Who Sings the Nation-State?: Language, Politics, Belonging download ebook
ISBN:
1905422571
ISBN13:
978-1905422579
Author:
Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak,Judith Butler
Publisher:
Seagull Books (October 1, 2007)
Language:
Pages:
128 pages
ePUB:
1594 kb
Fb2:
1255 kb
Other formats:
docx mbr lit lrf
Category:
Politics & Government
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.8

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak is university professor in the humanities at Columbia University and the author of many books, including The Post-Colonial Critic, Nationalism and the Imagination and, with Judith Butler.

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak is university professor in the humanities at Columbia University and the author of many books, including The Post-Colonial Critic, Nationalism and the Imagination and, with Judith Butler, Who Sings the Nation-State?, the last two also published by Seagull Books. This is not a good book.

by Judith Butler & Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak. Nuclear Physics: Exploring the Heart of Matter. Pretending to not be afraid is as good as actually not being afraid. Who Sings the Nation-State brings together two of America´s foremost critics and two of the most. 276 Pages·2013·672 KB·87,131 Downloads·New!

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Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. 1. Applied Dynamics: With Applications to Multibody and Mechatronic Systems.

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Judith Butler and Gayatri Spivak - Who Sings the Nation State. The category of the stateless is reproduced not simply by the nation-state but by a certain operation of power that seeks to forcibly align nation with state, one that takes the hyphen, as it were, as chain

Judith Butler and Gayatri Spivak - Who Sings the Nation State. A Critique of Post Colonial Reason. The category of the stateless is reproduced not simply by the nation-state but by a certain operation of power that seeks to forcibly align nation with state, one that takes the hyphen, as it were, as chain. At least two implications follow: the nation-. state expels and contains those individuals (whom Arendt consistently regards as "national minorities") in zones for which "oversight" is yet another permutation of the very nation-state. in need of monitoring.

Judith Butler and Gayatri Spivak.

Who Sings the Nation-State brings together two of Americas foremost critics and two of the most influential theorists of the last decade. Together, they explore the past, present and future of the state in a time of globalization. What is contained in a state has become ever more plural whilst the boundaries of a state have become ever more fluid. Judith Butler and Gayatri Spivak. Oct 25, 2019 mimosa maoist added it. Shelves: theory-criticism.

Judith Butler, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak. Скачать (djvu, 498 Kb).

Who Sings the Nation-State brings together two of America ́s foremost critics and two of the most influential theorists of. .

Who Sings the Nation-State brings together two of America ́s foremost critics and two of the most influential theorists of the last decade. Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak is Avalon Foundation Professor in the Humanities and Director of the Center for Comparative Literature and Society at Columbia University and author of numerous works including In Other Worlds, The Post-Colonial Critic, Outside in the Teaching Machine, A Critique of Postcolonial Reason, and Death of a Discipline.

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Books will be free of page markings. Показать все 2 объявления с новыми товарами. Explores what both Enlightenment and contemporary philosophers have to say about the idea of the nation-state, who exercises power in the world, whether there is such a thing as a right to rights, and the past, present, and future of the state in a time of globalization.

Who Sings the Nation-State brings together two of America´s foremost critics and two of the most influential theorists of the last decade. Together, they explore the past, present and future of the state in a time of globalization.

What is contained in a state has become ever more plural whilst the boundaries of a state have become ever more fluid. No longer does a state naturally come with a nation. In a world of migration and shifting allegiances - caused by cultural, economic, military and climatic change - the state is a more provisional place and its inhabitants more stateless.

This spirited and engaging conversation ranges widely across Palestine, what Enlightenment and key contemporary philosophers have to say about the state, who exercises power in today´s world, whether we can have a right to rights, and even what the singing of the Star Spangled Banner in Spanish says about the complex world we live in today.

Reviews:
  • Gadar
Read the reviews above, I agree. And my book stopped on page 116 in mid-sentence, so I am not even sure how it ends. Go read this online.
  • Global Progression
This is not a good book. No contextual background is given for Butler and Spivak's theoretical dialogue on statelessness, and the dialogue itself is at turns pedantic (see Butler's punning on the word "state") and banal (see both critics' comments on the EU). The dialogue's alternating obfuscation and dullness may be accounted for by the fact that it appears to be a staged "conversation" between Butler and Spivak at a conference or symposium. Even on those terms, however, the book is a bit of a waste -- the pomp of the dialogue's tone is simply not matched by the critical points made in it. If you're looking for a much more engaged theoretical work on these issues, see Etienne Balibar's *We, the People of Europe?*
  • Arilak
I have to second the previous reviewer's negative comments -- it accurately assesses the substantive shortcomings of this book -- and add my own 2 cents (and 2 stars) worth about some additional problems. The text is a apparently a transcript of a conference or panel discussion between Butler and Spivak, with some questions from audience members at the end of their exchange, but there is absolutely no introduction or even a brief statement to contextualize their statements. Was this in fact a conference or panel discussion? If so, where, and what was the conference title or topic? Without any of that information the reader is projected into the middle of a conversation without any explanation. It makes it hard to get one's bearings, and as the previous reviewer argues, there isn't much of substance to hang on to as you make your way through the book. Very disappointing effort from Spivak and Butler, as well as the editor/publisher of this book.
  • Gogal
Butler and Spivak have repeatedly earned respect for their scholarship. This (essays, dialogue, non-book?)"effort" seems to imply that their reputations will suffice in place of familiarity with the literatures of the central subjects on which they pontificate. They (ab)use well-established, still very much germane, concepts without regard to current usages by both mainstream and critical theory-grounded writers. It is as though they had invented their subjects yesterday: they make little effort to relate their comments to either the empirical or theoretical scholarship. The consequence should be treating this little volume the way its authors treat the bodies of relevant work on the theme they address; unfortunately a few persons may be sufficiently motivated by the names on the title-page to buy the book. Given its thin and airy (vacuous would not be too strong)content, however, is likely to be quickly forgotten. It fails to contribute to intellectual discourse
  • Golden Lama
It is surely a reflection of the demand for the Latest on globalization and the nation-state from highly commodified theorists that this super-slender hardcover volume (with approx. 120 words per page) hit a sales rank consistently below 5,000 on Amazon.com for weeks prior to its release. The scandal is that neither Butler nor Spivak have an in-depth knowledge of globalization or nationalism, but their comments and sound-bytes will soon be the most widely cited on these topics. Their iconic status as all-purpose references is built on a simulacra of scholarship that depends on two factors: 1) an audience that is unwilling to do the in-depth reading to understand globalization but wants sound-bytes to stay current and relevant and 2) the license granted to some celebrity scholars to comment on subjects well beyond their expertise.

Butler comes up with the astonishing claim (p. 13) that hardly anyone writes about statelessness in the social sciences now (what has she been reading?!); and Spivak tops this with her declaration (p. 87) that "the European constitution is an economic document" (what happened to the articles on secularism, militarism, and human rights). In a revealing exchange, when Butler asks Spivak to clarify what she means by critical regionalism, Spivak careens from Evo Morales to East Asia to South Asia to Habermas, to undocumented workers in the United States, to Iran, to NATO, to Russia in 5 pages to make the wafer-thin conclusion: "It [critical regionalism] goes under and over nationalisms but keeps the abstract structures of something like a state." No other scholar would be allowed to hang an argument on this flimsy peg, but she can and does. Spivak dodges every call to define her terms or offer a sustained argument. Along the way, she tosses up terms like "critical regionalism" "sustainable exploitation" (when has exploitation not tried to be sustainable) which will soon be the buzzwords of the moment. Needless to say, there is a large body of work produced about the refigured regionalisms in Latin America, Asia, and Africa (often by scholars working in institutions in these regions) that makes Spivak seem superficial and glib. Indeed, the argument for regional human rights instruments has been made at least since the First World Conference on Human Rights in 1993, but of course this becomes citable only when it comes from a Spivak. The irony is that in humanities departments, it will be the Spivakisms that will circulate, while the other work will be strenuously ignored. To think that it was Spivak who first charged her interlocutors with "sanctioned ignorance."
  • Cerekelv
Although short, this book is one of the only inquiries into sovereignty that moves beyond the theoretical framework of Agamben, and begins to explore new vocabularies for addressing postcolonial subjectivity. Butler and Spivak breathe new life into a text by Ardent, which they use to theorize the relationship between language and sovereignty and expose an underlying condition of statelessness. I immensely enjoyed these great thinkers, and would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in political theory.