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Rum, Romanism, and Rebellion: The Making of a President, 1884 download ebook

by Mark Wahlgren Summers

Rum, Romanism, and Rebellion: The Making of a President, 1884 download ebook
ISBN:
0807825247
ISBN13:
978-0807825242
Author:
Mark Wahlgren Summers
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press (March 20, 2000)
Language:
Pages:
408 pages
ePUB:
1695 kb
Fb2:
1703 kb
Other formats:
txt mobi mbr rtf
Category:
Politics & Government
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.6

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Home Browse Books Book details, Rum, Romanism & Rebellion: The Making of .Rum, Romanism & Rebellion: The Making of a President, 1884. By Mark Wahlgren Summers. The presidential election of 1884, in which Grover Cleveland ended the Democrats' twenty-four-year presidential drought by defeating Republican challenger James G. Blaine, was one of the gaudiest in American history, remembered today less for its political significance than for the mudslinging and slander that characterized the campaign. But a closer look at the infamous election reveals far more complexity than previous stereotypes allowed, argues Mark Summers.

Mark Wahlgren Summers is professor of history at the University of Kentucky and author of The Press Gang: Newspapers and Politics, 1865-1878. Библиографические данные.

Mobile version (beta). Rum, Romanism, and Rebellion: The Making of a President, 1884. Mark Wahlgren Summers. Download (pdf, . 8 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Rum, Romanism, and Rebellion: The Making of a President, 1884

Rum, Romanism, and Rebellion: The Making of a President, 1884. Behind all the mud and malarkey, he says, lay a world of issues and consequences.

PDF On Feb 1, 2008, ROBERT A. MCGUIRE and others published Rum, Romanism, Rebellion: The Making of a.In Rum, Romanism, & Rebellion, Mark Wahlgren Summers tells the story of the. presidential election of Grover Cleveland in 1884. MCGUIRE and others published Rum, Romanism, Rebellion: The Making of a President 1884. Chapel Hill and London: The University of North Carolina Press, 2000. The story told is a political history of the.

of A President, 1884 Mark Wahlgren Summers (University of North Carolina). the party whose antecedents have been rum, Romanism, and rebellion.

Rum, Romanism, & Rebellion The Making of A President, 1884 Mark Wahlgren Summers (University of North Carolina). But it wasn't until we read Summers exhaustive discussion of the campaign of 1884 that we learn that one Dr. Samuel D. Burchard, addressing a gathering of the Religious Bureau of the Republican National Committee, a week before the general election, stated, We are Republicans, and don't propose to leave our party and identify ourselves with the party whose antecedents have been rum, Romanism, and rebellion. We are loyal to our flag.

by Mark Wahlgren Summers.

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Rum, Romanism, and Rebellion The Making of a President, 1884 by Mark Wahlgren Summers 9780807848494 (Paperback, 2000) Delivery UK delivery is usually within 7 to 9 working days. Read full description.

Mark Summers moves beyond the stereotypes to uncover more than a mean and meaningless campaign, where issues . Summers's special contribution to revisionism is that he demonstrates how even the election of 1884 fits into a revisionist framework.

Mark Summers moves beyond the stereotypes to uncover more than a mean and meaningless campaign, where issues real to voters' lives surfaced in spite of the mudslinging. Written with verve and pointed humor, Rum, Romanism, and Rebellion makes important contributions to the ongoing reevaluation of Gilded Age America. Donald A. Ritchie, . Senate Historical Office. Anyone wishing to understand the broader context behind those stories will find Summers's analysis of great value.

The presidential election of 1884, in which Grover Cleveland ended the Democrats' twenty-four-year presidential drought by defeating Republican challenger James G. Blaine, was one of the gaudiest in American history, remembered today less for its political significance than for the mudslinging and slander that characterized the campaign. But a closer look at the infamous election reveals far more complexity than previous stereotypes allowed, argues Mark Summers. Behind all the mud and malarkey, he says, lay a world of issues and consequences. Summers suggests that both Democrats and Republicans sensed a political system breaking apart, or perhaps a new political order forming, as voters began to drift away from voting by party affiliation toward voting according to a candidate's stand on specific issues. Mudslinging, then, was done not for public entertainment but to tear away or confirm votes that seemed in doubt. Uncovering the issues that really powered the election and stripping away the myths that still surround it, Summers uses the election of 1884 to challenge many of our preconceptions about Gilded Age politics.
Reviews:
  • Zacki
This is an extremely insightful examination of the election that first put Grover Cleveland in the White House. The ways in which Summers analyzes the political process remind me of Holt's masterpiece, "The Rise and Fall of the American Whig Party". (That is a much more massive book, as it covers a broader topic over a longer period). The use of political cartoons of the period to support the narrative is probably the best I've seen. The style is engaging, although occasionally I think Summers gets slightly carried away. For example, at least one discussion of the standard myths about the period goes on long enough to be somewhat disruptive. Also, while I don't detect any factual bias, there is a tendency to look at things more a Republican perspective. That is, issues (e.g., the role of the minor parties) are more often discussed in terms of problems facing the GOP and how well they did or did not deal with them. The outcome of the election is reported in language that seems rather wistful that Blaine lost. Again, this is only a matter of relative emphasis - there is excellent material on the complex relations between the Democrats at the national and state levels and the rival Democratic machines in New York City. Despite my minor quibbles, I highly recommend this book to anyone with a general interest in American political history, and it certainly must be read by anyone with a particular interest in this period.
  • Spilberg
Mark Summers is one of the great historians of mid-nineteenth century America. He is fully capable of taking subjects which have seemingly been worked to death and making them fresh with new material and original analysis. Rum Romanism and Rebellion does just that, making Blaine and Cleveland seem more vital and alive than the current occupants of the White House. The issues engage us, the political battle grips us. This is one of the author's best (to my mind, Mr. Summers best work is his two volume work on political corruption [neatly divided between ante-bellum crooks and post-war thieves]; let's hope that Mr. Summers has a trilogy in mind and next turns his attention to wartime corruption: from the transcontinental railroad to the supply of Union soldiers and the appointment of generals, that era was rife with corruption, yet very little has ever been written about it). Well done, Mr. Summers!
  • Rainbearer
Anyone interested in politics or American history should love this book. The writing style is crisp and entertaining and the author strikes the right balance between explaining long ago and long forgotten events without drowning the reader in unnecesary details. The 1884 election itself was one of the most interesting of our history with sex scandals, charges of political corruption, party splits, and campaign blunders. The author brings the excitement to life and lets the reader understand not only what happened but why it occured and, even more interesting, what the participants had hoped to accomplish with their political strategies. The book succeeds in describing how late 19th century elections looked and felt to the participants. The human dynamic skillfully set out in this book (the cynical maneuverings, the overheated rhetoric, and the intense partisanship)are very familiar with what we experience in campaigns today-this very familiarity helps make Blaine and Cleveland seem real and not just sterile historical figures. Read this book!