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True Believer: Inside the Investigation and Capture of Ana Montes, Cuba's Master Spy download ebook

by Scott W. Carmichael

True Believer: Inside the Investigation and Capture of Ana Montes, Cuba's Master Spy download ebook
ISBN:
1591141001
ISBN13:
978-1591141006
Author:
Scott W. Carmichael
Publisher:
Naval Institute Press; First Edition edition (March 5, 2007)
Language:
Pages:
208 pages
ePUB:
1257 kb
Fb2:
1175 kb
Other formats:
docx mbr lrf lrf
Category:
Politics & Government
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

Cuba is a threat, they do conduct espionage against the US, and their work with Ana Montes demonstrates that . The author is a very good writer

One person found this helpful. The author is a very good writer. And clearly a smart and personable guy.

Although Montes did not fit the FBI's profile of a spy and easily managed to defeat the agency's polygraph exams, Carmichael became suspicious of her activities and with the FBI over a period of several years developed a solid case against her. Here he tells the story of that long and ultimately successful spy hunt.

Carmichael, Scott W. True Believer: Inside the Investigation. spying for Cuba, whom Carmichael quickly. identified as Montes. Three months later, the FBI began a full-field investigation that. led to her arrest on September 21, 2001. of. Ana Montes, Cuba's. Annapolis: Naval Institute Press. Publication Date: March 2007. On March 20, 2002, Ana Belen Montes, the Defense Intelligence Agency's (DIA). primary politicaVmilitary analyst on Cuba. When detained, Montes was a forty-four

Carmichael wrote the book to warn people that Cuba is a threat.

Carmichael wrote the book to warn people that Cuba is a threat. Cuba is a threat, they do conduct espionage against the US, and their work with Ana Montes demonstrates that they are very good at it. Fascinating Tale of.

Carmichael, who had led the DIA investigation of Montes, named her as being directly responsible for the death of Green Beret . True Believer: Inside the Investigation and Capture of Ana Montes, Cuba's Master Spy. Annapolis MD: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 978-1-59114-100-6.

Carmichael, who had led the DIA investigation of Montes, named her as being directly responsible for the death of Green Beret Sergeant Gregory A. Fronius who was killed at El Paraíso, El Salvador, on March 31, 1987, during the FMLN attack.

This listing is for True Believer : Inside the . Please take a look at all of our shipping options.

This listing is for True Believer : Inside the Investigation & Capture of Ana Montes, Cuba's Master Spy by Scott W. Carmichael (2007, Hardcover) : Scot. ISBN 9781591141006: All previously owned books are guaranteed to be in good condition. For US customer standard shipping is Media mail typically which takes 5-9 business days for customers living in the continental US. Customers that upgrade to priority mail can expect delivery within 2-4 business days.

Here he tells the story of that long and ultimately successful spy hunt. Motivated by ideology not money, Montes was one of the last "true believers" of the communist era.

Ana Montes appeared to be a model employee of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), advancing quickly through the ranks to. .

Ana Montes appeared to be a model employee of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), advancing quickly through the ranks to become its top analyst on Cuban affairs. But for sixteen years Montes sent Castro some of America's most closely guarded secrets and at the same time influenced what the United States thought it knew about Cuba. Carmichael offers readers a front-row seat on that long and ultimately successful spy hunt.

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Ana Montes appeared to be a model employee of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA). Known to her coworkers as the Queen of Cuba, she was an overachiever who advanced quickly through the ranks of Latin American specialists to become the intelligence community's top analyst on Cuban affairs. But throughout her sixteen-year career at DIA, Montes was sending Castro some of America's most closely guarded secrets and at the same time helping influence what the United States thought it knew about Cuba. When she was finally arrested in September 2001, she became the most senior American intelligence official ever accused of operating as a Cuban spy from within the federal U.S. government. Unrepentant as she serves out her time in a federal prison in Texas, Montes remains the only member of the intelligence community ever convicted of espionage on behalf of the Cuban government.

This inside account of the investigation that led to her arrest has been written by Scott W. Carmichael, the DIA's senior counterintelligence investigator who persuaded the FBI to launch an investigation. Although Montes did not fit the FBI's profile of a spy and easily managed to defeat the agency's polygraph exams, Carmichael became suspicious of her activities and with the FBI over a period of several years developed a solid case against her. Here he tells the story of that long and ultimately successful spy hunt. Carmichael reveals the details of their efforts to bring her to justice, offering readers a front-row seat for the first major U.S. espionage case of the twentieth century. She was arrested less than twenty-four hours before learning details of the U.S. plan to invade Afghanistan post-September 11. Motivated by ideology not money, Montes was one of the last "true believers" of the communist era. Because her arrest came just ten days after 9/11, it went largely unnoticed by the American public. This book calls attention to the grave damage Montes inflicted on U.S. security--Carmichael even implicates her in the death of a Green Beret fighting Cuban-backed insurgents in El Salvador--and the damage she would have continued to inflict had she not been caught.

Reviews:
  • Mojind
The author states up front that he's not a writer, but that doesn't mean that the story has to be so boring. I had never heard of this case, so I was glad to find this book mentioned on the Wikipedia site about the spy. But the Wikipedia site actually has more information than this entire book! And Jim Popkin's Washington Post article "The Queen of Cuba" is far more informative and provides many more details in about a page of text. Carmichael leaves out details that make the story interesting. For instance, he tells how "data points" eventually matched narrowed down the suspect list, but NEVER tells what those data points are (you can find a few in Popkin's article). He provides a pseudonym for her boyfriend (his name is readily available in articles about the case). And he seems utterly unable to tell about any of the "spycraft" that either she used (like the crypto-system, or pass-offs), even though this type of information is available in countless spy novels, not to mention true stories, or the spy-craft he and his cohorts used to capture her. Apparently her days of actually meeting with her handlers or passing off materials to them had ended long before the investigation started, leaving a completely unsatisfying story leading to her capture. Bravo to you, Mr. Carmichael for catching her and then giving all the profits from the book to one of her apparent victims, but sorry, it's not a very compelling story. Naval Institute Press usually does a better job on subject specific books, but this one got by the editors, I guess.
  • Siatanni
As others have posted, not a bad book, but sorely lacking the behind the scenes detail that people like me pay money to read about. Hard to believe the "sources and methods" are still so secret 16 years later, or that the Cubans don't already know. This is the problem when an author writes a book while still working for the government and has a career to worry about, versus someone who leaves for the private sector or retires. The question he should have also pursued with more vigor is why no heads rolled for missing the opportunity to catch her 5 years earlier.
  • Akirg
True Believer is an account about the investigation that led to her arrest and conviction as told by one of the investigators, Scott Carmichael. The book itself may be only three or four stars but I must cut Carmichael some slack for a couple of reasons. First, the man is not -- nor does he ever claim to be -- a professional author. I personally thing I have more writing talents than he but that is another issue. He had a story to tell and he did so to the best of his ability. To try to grade him at the same level as a professional writer would be unfair to him.

Second, the evidence presented against Montes appears flimsy. But obviously it was enough to interest investigators to investigate and arrest and it was enough for her to plea guilty. I am sure Carmichael had much more to tell but the book had to be reviewed to ensure sensitive and even classified information was not put in the book. It hurts the story but anybody who writes a book of this nature has to follow the rules even if it hurts the story.

Carmichael wrote the book to warn people that Cuba is a threat. Sure, the Cubans are not likely to mount a massive military invasion against the US any time soon but they do work directly against our interests in other parts of the world as a surrogate and they can share information with our enemies including terrorist groups. Cuba is a threat, they do conduct espionage against the US, and their work with Ana Montes demonstrates that they are very good at it.
  • Ieregr
I guess what is frustrating is that a person can deceive her country based solely on her personal views. I disagree a great deal with our country's posture and laws but that is the fabric of democracy. I voted, I lost and I still, nevertheless, follow the law. Ann Belen's story is told by the very person who watched her as an internal affairs officer. His first hand re-telling of her story and his surveillance is well told and exciting. I just can't believe her sentence. I feel she should have received life instead of a mere 25 years....shame on us. I read this book after reading "The Washington Post" article about her in the Sunday paper. A riveting story. I would be curious to know how she views her decision now. She has 10 years more on her sentence to realize that she was paid for her intelligence and not her personal view.