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"Only the Super-Rich Can Save Us!" download ebook

by Ralph Nader

"Only the Super-Rich Can Save Us!" download ebook
ISBN:
158322923X
ISBN13:
978-1583229231
Author:
Ralph Nader
Publisher:
Seven Stories Press; Edition ed. edition (March 22, 2011)
Language:
Pages:
512 pages
ePUB:
1519 kb
Fb2:
1414 kb
Other formats:
azw doc doc lrf
Category:
Politics & Government
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.1

Only the Super-Rich Can Save Us! is a 2009 fictional work by American political activist Ralph Nader, described by him as a practical utopia, in the style of Edward Bellamy's 1888 utopian novel Looking Backwards. Nader wrote the book to inspire.

Only the Super-Rich Can Save Us! is a 2009 fictional work by American political activist Ralph Nader, described by him as a practical utopia, in the style of Edward Bellamy's 1888 utopian novel Looking Backwards. Nader wrote the book to inspire imaginative solutions to the problem of corrupt politicians and financial institutions

If only those super-rich men and women of conscience would take the first step

If only those super-rich men and women of conscience would take the first step. 10 people found this helpful. Here is the final test for a book like this: can anyone really deny that Ralph Nader's world, as described in "Only the Super-Rich Can Save Us", would be decidedly better than where we are now? "No", said the billionaire who has made too mcuh money and must now take on the challenge of building a better world.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In the cozy den of the large but modest house in Omaha where he has lived since he started on his first billion.

What if these seventeen superrich individuals decided to galvanize a movement for alternative forms of energy that will effectively clean up the environment? What if together they took on corporate goliaths and Congress to provide the necessities of life and advance the solutions so long left on the shelf by an avaricious oligarchy? What could happen?

Start by marking Only the Super-Rich Can Save Us! as Want to Read . Doris Kearns Goodwin writing about Lincoln deserves 700 pages.

Start by marking Only the Super-Rich Can Save Us! as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Nader just going off about super-rich people trying to save the world in a fictional setting might be interesting for a short story, or better yet, a story written by someone who could better express Nader’s vision. But it does not deserve 700 pages. 700 pages requires a dedication from his readers that even someone like me, an avid reader, cannot muster.

In the cozy den of the large but modest house in Omaha where he has lived since he started on his first billion, Warren Buffett watched the horrors of Hurricane Katrina unfold on television in early September 2005.

Ralph Nader imagines placing seventeen billionaires in one room to solve the country's problems, from the .

Ralph Nader imagines placing seventeen billionaires in one room to solve the country's problems, from the redevelopment of New Orleans to a reassessment of corporate citizenry and a plan to address environmental issues. Ralph Nader discusses his politically injected novel with two of the billionaires in his book, businessman and philanthropist Ted Turner and Peter Lewis, non-executive Chairman of Progressive Corporation at the New York Public Library in New York City.

Only the Super Rich Can Save Us!

Only the Super-Rich Can Save Us! is a 2009 fictional work by American political activist Ralph Nader, described by him as a practical utopia, in the style of Edward Bellamy's 1888 utopian novel Looking Backwards. Nader wrote the book to inspire imaginative solutions to the problem of corrupt politicians and financial institutions. Similarity to Atlas Shrugged. Only the Super Rich Can Save Us!

For Sale in US Only. Due to publisher sales restrictions, this content can only be purchased with a valid US billing address.

Publisher: Seven Stories Press (RHP). Print ISBN: 9781583229231, 158322923X. For Sale in US Only. Includes US and its territories (Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, Guam, & Marianna Islands). You are leaving VitalSource and being redirected to "Only the Super-Rich Can Save Us!" . eTextbook Return Policy.

"In the cozy den of the large but modest house in Omaha where he has lived since he started on his first billion, Warren Buffett watched the horrors of Hurricane Katrina unfold on television in early September 2005. . . . On the fourth day, he beheld in disbelief the paralysis of local, state, and federal authorities unable to commence basic operations of rescue and sustenance, not just in New Orleans, but in towns and villages all along the Gulf Coast. . . He knew exactly what he had to do. . ."So begins the vivid fictional account by political activist and bestselling author Ralph Nader that answers the question, "What if?" What if a cadre of superrich individuals tried to become a driving force in America to organize and institutionalize the interests of the citizens of this troubled nation? What if some of America's most powerful individuals decided it was time to fix our government and return the power to the people? What if they focused their power on unionizing Wal-Mart? What if a national political party were formed with the sole purpose of advancing clean elections? What if these seventeen superrich individuals decided to galvanize a movement for alternative forms of energy that will effectively clean up the environment? What if together they took on corporate goliaths and Congress to provide the necessities of life and advance the solutions so long left on the shelf by an avaricious oligarchy? What could happen?This extraordinary story, written by the author who knows the most about citizen action, returns us to the literature of American social movements—to Edward Bellamy, to Upton Sinclair, to John Steinbeck, to Stephen Crane—reminding us in the process that changing the body politic of America starts with imagination.
Reviews:
  • Usic
I caught a brief interview with Ralph Nader where he talked about his book. He said it was kind of like the anti-Atlas Shrugged with a great story line of billionaires coming to the Country's rescue. I was a big fan of the Ayn Rand novel so I thought I'd give OTSRCSU a try. While I don't agree with everything Mr. Nader has written about the battle to get America back on it's feet, I found myself nodding my head an awful lot as I read.

The story opens with Hurricane Katrina and Warren Buffett watching the chaos on the news. The despair he feels starts him on a journey to fix what's wrong with this country. To make changes so that future generations don't have to face the same problems and disgrace we face now. He assembles a core group of multi-talented billionaires to assist with his project. With a coordinated effort they begin to go after the establishment, ultimately attempting to get various amendements passed for the good of the country. Of course, it goes beyond the legislature piece. They have set out to change the atmosphere of the country, returning back to the premise that we are all equal and deserve a fair shake. Getting people interested and involved.

Meanwhile, a group of corporate CEO's have banded together to battle the billionaires. The CEO's hire a former corporate raider, Lobo, to be the pointman and a powerful lobbyist, Brovar Dortwist, to handle Washington. The tactics are to scare the everyday folks with horror stories of companies failing while Brovar keeps the lobbying pressure on the politicians in the CEO's pockets.

I couldn't help but feel good while reading this book. I have to admit that a few times I found myself wondering how great life would be once the legislature passed only to crash back to reality. That's how straight forward and simple some of the proposals are. It's a guidance plan on how we-the-people can take the country back from the politicians and corporations slowly destroying it. At the same time, it's careful to point out that these same politicians and corporations are important pieces to the puzzle for making life better. While tackling issues like a living wage, universal healthcare, stricter safety regulations and clean elections, the story is sometimes funny - sometimes serious - ALWAYS enjoyable! You won't be disappointed.
  • Stick
My first knowledge of this book came in a Newsweek magazine review that devoted a whole page to slamming it, including an ugly picture of the author. That really perked my interest, because the reviewer called Ralph a "loser" and "pathetic," ostensibly for portraying scenarios in the book that would never happen in real life. Okay - without having read it, I knew that the book must have really pushed that guy's buttons to make such a flimsy case against a book, which is after all a work of fiction! So I bought it and am sooo glad I did. I have enjoyed reading it as much as anything I've ever read. I found the details of the machinations going on to be both hilarious and informational. I found so many instances, for example his portrayal of the meeting of the CEO of WalMart and his board, as their anti-American practices are being spotlighted in nationally released videos, to be hilarious. I wish it was non-ficition. Oh well.
  • Silly Dog
I agree with Nader on almost every issue, I believe that we are doomed unless our super-rich class becomes more intelligent and better-informed, and I like the notion that if one can visualize something it can happen. So why did I not enjoy reading this book?

1) At over 500 pages, it is numbingly long. A crisp 200 pages would have sufficed. (Do editors still exist?)

2) Nader is entitled to his fantasy of how political change could come about, but I found his wishful thinking to be wildly over-optimistic in a couple of ways:

* He shares the endearing progressive fantasy that, once made aware of reality, common people from all over the political spectrum will jump on the progressive bandwagon. For some reason, the preoccupation with God, Guns, Immigrants and Gays will suddenly disappear when confronted by simple common sense. Would that it were so.

* He vastly underestimates the skill with which the right wing, Wall Street, and corporations will oppose the progressive agenda. The skillful gutting of healthcare reform and the emergence of the Tea Party as a powerful force illustrate what any move toward a more egalitarian society would actually face.

Nevertheless, some readers will enjoy the book. It does serve as a primer on several political issues, and it gives the reader some idea of what participatory democracy would really look like. As such, it may be worth skimming. This jaded cynic, however, wants a bit more realism mixed in.