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The Jupiter Theft download ebook

by Donald Moffitt

The Jupiter Theft download ebook
ISBN:
0345255054
ISBN13:
978-0345255051
Author:
Donald Moffitt
Publisher:
Del Rey; 1st edition (May 12, 1979)
Language:
ePUB:
1821 kb
Fb2:
1928 kb
Other formats:
txt lrf rtf lrf
Category:
Science Fiction
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.5

The Jupiter Theft is a 1977 novel by science fiction writer Donald Moffitt, re-printed in 2003 with a new afterword.

The Jupiter Theft is a 1977 novel by science fiction writer Donald Moffitt, re-printed in 2003 with a new afterword. The initial part of the novel mixes near-future thriller and disaster novel scenarios, focussing on the discovery of a moving gamma-ray source headed towards Earth from the direction of Cygnus X-1, and the diversion of a Chinese-American Jupiter mission to investigate the new Solar System intruder

Donald Moffitt's first book was published in 1977, entitled 'The Jupiter Theft'. He has since had four more books published focussed on science fiction adventures and over 300,000 copies of these books were sold.

Donald Moffitt's first book was published in 1977, entitled 'The Jupiter Theft'. This is his first book in over a decade. Hardcover: 448 pages. Publisher: I Books (September 16, 2003).

Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline.

Donald Moffitt (1931–2014) was born in Boston In 1977 he published his first full-length science fiction novel, The Jupiter Theft, under his own name.

Donald Moffitt (1931–2014) was born in Boston. In 1977 he published his first full-length science fiction novel, The Jupiter Theft, under his own name. Moffitt was a visionary novelist, praised for his scientific accuracy and his high-speed, high-tech stories. He lived in rural Maine with his wife, Ann, until his death in December 2014. Библиографические данные.

Author: Donald Moffitt. Publisher: Ballantine, 1977. The Lunar Observatory is picking up a very strange and unidentifiable signal from the direction of Cygnus

Author: Donald Moffitt. The Lunar Observatory is picking up a very strange and unidentifiable signal from the direction of Cygnus. When the meaning of this signal is finally understood, it clearly spells disaster for earth. An immense object is rushing towards the Solar System, traveling nearly at the speed of light, its intense nuclear radiation sure to kill all life on earth within months.

The Jupiter Theft - Donald Moffitt. Against it was silhouetted the unfinished framework of the Jupiter ship, just a couple of miles off, a spidery wheel with a spear through the hub. Li’s voice crackled in his helmet. Thanks, buddy, he said.

The Jupiter Theft book. The Jupiter Theft is the second book I’ve read by Donald Moffitt

The Jupiter Theft book. The Jupiter Theft is the second book I’ve read by Donald Moffitt. The first, Children of the Comet, I read shortly after his death a few years ago. It was unplanned that I picked up this book, but midway through I realized I had inadvertently given myself a chance to see how the author’s writing had progressed over almost forty years. This is his first science fiction novel. I hadn’t heard of Donald Moffitt before stumbling upon Children of Men.

The Lunar Observatory on earth is picking up a very strange and unidentifiable signal from the direction of Cygnus. When the meaning of this signal is finally understood, it clearly spells disaster for earth. An immense object is rushing towards the Solar System, travelling nearly at the speed of light, its intense nuclear radiation is sure to kill all life on earth within months. As it moves close the humans can discern that it is an enormous convoy of some sort, nearly as large as a planet. And there is nothing anyone can do to divert such an enormous alien object. Then, unexpectedly, the object changes course and heads toward the dead planet of Jupiter but what could an enormous alien convoy want with such a useless planet?
Reviews:
  • Darkshaper
An object the size of a large planet moves into the solar system at nearly the speed of light. Shortly after astronomers on the moon detect the object, however, it slows and shrinks. It seems to be entering a solar orbit when it suddenly changes course and begins to orbit Jupiter. Coincidentally, a planned scientific mission to a Jovian moon has been preparing for departure. A hastily assembled military force armed with nuclear weapons joins the team of scientists on its voyage. What they discover, of course, are aliens who appear to be moving into the neighborhood. It turns out that the aliens aren't interested in being good neighbors.

The Jupiter Theft is a plot-centered story that revolves around two alien species (with another playing a minor background role), although one of the species doesn't appear until the novel is nearing its end. Moffitt devoted considerable effort to alien building and ship building but gave less attention to character building -- a common enough failing in hard sf stories. Military characters are militaristic, government officials are bureaucratic, scientists are smart, and everyone else suffers from thought deficiency. If some of the loving care devoted to the novel's science had been diverted to character development, this would be a better book. Fortunately, the central idea (revealed about halfway through the story) is creative and the plot is entertaining.

Moffitt's prose style is less than scintillating and the dialog is wooden, sometimes silly. From time to time the story gives way to a science lecture -- another common failing of hard sf novels, but fortunately not a frequent occurrence in The Jupiter Theft. Some of the storyline is all too familiar, as when an alien tells a human: "You are too puny to interfere with our purpose." There's nothing very original about puny humans encountering (and being held captive by) technologically superior aliens. Moffitt's attempt to add a political dimension to the novel by commingling Americans and devoutly socialist Chinese in the crew adds unintended humor to the story.

Nonetheless, some aspects of the story are clever, some chapters are exciting, and most of the time the novel is sufficiently fast-paced to keep the reader soldiering on despite the novel's flaws. The ending is satisfying. There's enough fun here to entertain fans of alien cultures, hard sf, and fast action. I would give The Jupiter Theft 3 1/2 stars if that were possible.
  • Hellstaff
Donald Moffitt just can't write about tiny things. His ideas become huge engineering projects, of such massive scope that it boggles the mind. Using a whole gas planet as as fuel, taking it along and protecting your ships from the radiation by putting them behind a moon is something that NOBODY would of thought of before. Yet by making it seem simple, if not also a tad ruthless, he makes the Cygnans seem totally alien. The scope, the time, the very sweep of their plans and projects force the reader to see them as a totally alien culture.
In fact he did such a good job that Cygnans are in both Barlowe's Guide to Extraterrestrials AND Clifford Pickover's The Science Of Aliens (along with a different artist's drawing of what a Cygnan looks like). The science of planet stealing might be questionable, but the design of the aliens, their history and their ways, in the book is a first class example of how to do it RIGHT.
  • Beabandis
I first read this book more than twenty years ago and it's still a great read. The aliens are well thought out, the technology is more than believable, and the protagonists are spot on with lots of action tossed in to keep your interest. I have read plenty of books by Asimov, Clarke, and Niven. The Jupiter Theft holds it's own and then some.
  • Voodoolkree
I first received and read this book as a kid during a stay in the hospital back when it was first printed. After reading again after 30+ years, I'm glad to say it hasn't lost anything. .
  • wanderpool
The Jupiter Theft comes from an era when the conventions of science fiction involved the idealism of technology and the future. This book reflects that paradigm, placing emphasis on human ingenuity and the promise of future exploration. It's a welcome change to today's comparatively more cynical outlook on the human legacy, and when I closed the book I was satisfied with the hope and wonder expressed in the resolution.

But that reflection of the book's cultural heritage has a darker side as well. The inclusion of the "free love" concept only serves to make the human characters seem undisciplined and even idiotic at one point. I'm not sure exactly what the author intended with the subplot involving this beyond suggestive intentions, but the only thing I got out of it is that even though humanity has reached the stars it still doesn't understand the concepts of population control.

That is only a small quibble with the otherwise fascinating plot development, and I really enjoyed the balance of technological innovation and xenobiological attention. Very good read!
  • FireWater
An audaciously large concept. Stealing the biggest planet. Well thought out aliens, great human characters, a real winner. Buy this.
  • Zyniam
I found the 1977 edition of Jupiter Theft in a mom-and-pop used bookstore. Read it about fifteen years ago and fondly remember it as an enjoyable pasttime. The science seems a bit iffy: alien spacecraft circles Jupiter at near lightspeed and relativistic mass increase enables it to "drag" the planet out of the solar system!

One notable quality concerning the plot is that it actually has a focus. It is somewhat similar to that of two other SF classics, Clarke's Rendezvous with Rama and Niven's Ringworld, in which a band of intrepid humans get to adventure within a gigantic alien spacecraft. In Clarke's and Niven's books, the humans are essentially on an exploration. But in Moffitt's book, the humans must thwart the Cygnan's plan because their projected trajectory out of the solar system will take Jupiter and the Jupiter-mass Cygnan spacecraft destructively close to Earth. That is, the humans are engaged in a do-or-die mission (unlike the humans of the other two named novels).

Moffitt's story is somewhat predictable and cliche -- but it was tolerably well written and made for fun reading. Recommended.