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Talent for War download ebook

by Jack McDevitt

Talent for War download ebook
ISBN:
0425795535
ISBN13:
978-0425795538
Author:
Jack McDevitt
Publisher:
G P Putnam's Sons (December 31, 1998)
Language:
ePUB:
1238 kb
Fb2:
1590 kb
Other formats:
lrf lrf doc mbr
Category:
Science Fiction
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.7

Jack McDevitt is that rare species-an SF writer who knows history. Not content with merely developing intriguing ideas and vivid characters, he also writes stories which resonate on multiple levels.

Jack McDevitt is that rare species-an SF writer who knows history. A Talent for War, his best novel so far, haunts the memory of the reader and rewards repeated readings. Athena Andreadis, P.

Jack McDevitt's A Talent For War is a very well-crafted and well thought out book. A Talent For War was first published in 1989, so I am a bit of a late-comer to the party, so to speak

Jack McDevitt's A Talent For War is a very well-crafted and well thought out book. A Talent For War was first published in 1989, so I am a bit of a late-comer to the party, so to speak.

Jack McDevitt (born April 14, 1935) is an American science fiction author whose novels frequently deal with attempts to make contact with alien races, and with archaeology or xenoarchaeology

Jack McDevitt (born April 14, 1935) is an American science fiction author whose novels frequently deal with attempts to make contact with alien races, and with archaeology or xenoarchaeology. His two main series are the Alex Benedict series and the Priscilla Hutchins series. McDevitt's first published story was "The Emerson Effect" in The Twilight Zone Magazine in 1981.

A Talent for War Jack McDevitt. He knelt on the hard bench and watched the crystal water dribble across Father Curry's fingers into the silver bowl held by the postulant. The timeless symbol of man's effort to evade responsibility, it had always seemed to Chulohn the most significant of all the ancient rituals. There, he thought, is the essence of our nature, displayed endlessly throughout the ages for all who can see. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63.

Cam Chulohn loved the plain stone chapel. l of man's effort to evade responsibility, it had always seemed to Chulohn the most significant of all the ancient rituals.

A Talent for War. 404 printed pages. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Jack mcdevitt series: Alex Benedict. A Talent for War. Jack McDevitt. Christopher Sim changed mankind's history forever when he forged a rag-tag group of misfits into the weapon that broke the alien Ashiyyur. But now, one man believes Sim was a fraud, and Alex must follow the legend into the heart of the alien galaxy to confront a truth far stranger than any fiction.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Jack McDevitt - A Talent For War. McDevitt Jack. 952 Kb.

Reviews:
  • Mmsa
A Talent for War is the first novel in Jack McDevitt's Alex Benedict series, and it's another good read from this ingenious story teller. The novel takes place about 9,000 years in the future. Space travel has been perfected enabling human civilizations to expand through a large part of our galaxy. However, unfriendly alien civilizations are also encountered. Alex Benedict receives a posthumous message from his uncle informing him to take over his lucrative business as an archeologist and finder/broker of antiquities. The message mentions an unfinished project that would be extremely lucrative for Alex to pursue. When Alex arrives at his uncles' house, he quickly discovers there is something very peculiar about his uncle's unfinished project. The artificial intelligence that served his uncle informs him that its memory has been selectively wiped and it cannot provide any information about his master's last project. Nevertheless, Alex initiates an extensive investigation of his uncles' final activities, meetings and journeys. He is perplexed when he discovers that all information about his uncle's last starship voyage has been classified. Alex proves to be a persistent and adept detective, meeting with his uncle's contacts on several different planets, but he continues to encounter "official" roadblocks regarding creditable information about his uncle's final journeys and his death in a starship accident. He eventually begins to unravel the mystery, but the closer he gets to the concealed information, the more nefarious the plot becomes. Alex and his collaborators encounter frustrating, difficult and very dangerous circumstances as they close in on the prize. This is a very complex book with a multitude of characters and long detailed descriptions of the history of this future world. Many of those characters and historical descriptions are not important to the story, but they do reveal a richer ambiance for the reader. However, it is somewhat tedious for the reader to try to digest and remember all the information that McDevitt presents, especially in the first half of the book. The reader should be patient and confidant that it is not necessary to remember every person and every incident or bit of information that is presented. The patient reader is rewarded with a very interesting and entertaining story that focuses on a war that took place 200 years previously between humans and an alien civilization known at the Ashiyyur. The reader is treated to detailed and action-packed descriptions of space battles and the environments, technologies, and political ambitions associated with them. Benedict and his associates struggle on many distant planets and endure dangerous encounters until they locate an incredible artifact and reveal the story of a hero that changes the history of that ruthless Ashiyyurian war. I liked this science fiction mystery very much and I plan to read the succeeding Alex Benedict books.
  • fightnight
First let me comment on the Alex Benedict series in general. Several of my friends and myself have really enjoyed reading the Alex Benedict series of books, starting with A Talent For War. However, you must really understand what you are getting into here. This writing is formulaic genre writing at its best, with the primary genre being mystery adventure, not scifi. It is so reminiscent of the episodic adventures of my youth, except set in an adequately conceived scifi setting. This series is pure fluff and absolutely fun. It's the most exquisite guilty pleasure.

If you understand that you will be reading a well conceived mystery woven amidst a network of interesting historical enigmas from a science fictional world, investigated by cardboard characters who find themselves in ridiculous situations of peril which will likely elicit laughter at the author's audacity, and that you will find yourself merrily going along with it all without protest until you get to a rather satisfying ending, then these are the books for you. I don't normally read this type of novel, preferring the work of Banks, Reynolds, Brin, Simmons as well as classics like Sturgeon, Bester, Asimov and Heinlein. McDevitt's writing is like none of them (with the exception of Brin's Sundiver.) It is far more accessible, less taxing, and more addictive than any of those others. It's just good fun and provides the perfect break from more involved reading.

This particular book is the least formulaic and has, by far, the largest payoff at the end, which seemingly has caused readers who prefer the more simplistic formulas of the next three books to be put off. Don't be! This is the one that absolutely can't be missed. This is the only one of the series that will really give you any kind of perspective on the protagonists and is also the best for establishing the shape of the culture and landscape of this fictional world. Combine that with the best mystery unraveling of the bunch, and you have a great book.