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The Martian War: A Thrilling Eyewitness Account of the Recent Invasion As Reported by Mr. H.G. Wells download ebook

by Gabriel Mesta

The Martian War: A Thrilling Eyewitness Account of the Recent Invasion As Reported by Mr. H.G. Wells download ebook
ISBN:
0743446550
ISBN13:
978-0743446556
Author:
Gabriel Mesta
Publisher:
Gallery Books; Reprint edition (August 15, 2006)
Language:
Pages:
272 pages
ePUB:
1318 kb
Fb2:
1175 kb
Other formats:
lrf lit lrf rtf
Category:
Science Fiction
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.8

The Martian War book.

The Martian War book. Wells’, which is a fairly effective, if rather bold, summary.

Gabriel Mesta is better known as his alter ego of Kevin J. Anderson I was intrigued when I read the hype for this book, War of the Worlds being the first science fiction novel I read (after wearing out the Classics Illustrated version). Anderson. I was intrigued when I read the hype for this book, War of the Worlds being the first science fiction novel I read (after wearing out the Classics Illustrated version).

Wells is a 2006 science fiction novel by American writer Kevin J. Anderson, published under his pseudonym Gabriel Mesta. It is a retelling of . Wells' The War of the Worlds similar to Anderson's past work War of the Worlds: Global Dispatches. It recounts the Martian invasion from a variety of viewpoints, and has ties to Wells' other work.

But what if the Martian invasion was not entirely the product of H. G. Wells's vivid imagination? . Wells's vivid imagination? What if Wells witnessed something that spurred him to write The War of the Worlds not as a form of entertainment - but as a warning to the complacent people of Earth? . Discover the truth about Martian invasion not only from Wells himself, but also from the enigmatic Dr. Moreau, who documents the very first alien autopsy! Written by one of our most popular science fiction authors, and filled with both historical detail and marvelous flights of fancy, The Martian War is pure delight from start to finish.

Book Description Classic science fiction author H. Wells's most memorable and compelling novel was arguably The War of the . Wells's most memorable and compelling novel was arguably The War of the Worlds, made even more famous by the notorious Mercury Theater production starring Orson Wells that resulted in the "Night That. But what if the Martian invasion was not entirely the product of H. Wells's vivid imagination? What if Wells witnessed something that spurred him to write The War of the Worlds not as a form of entertainment - but as a warning to the complacent people of Earth?

тАФ1st Pocket Books hardcover ed. p. cm. ISBN 0-7434-4639-9 (hardcover) 1. Wells, H. (Herbert George), 1866-1946тАФFiction.

тАФ1st Pocket Books hardcover ed. 2. Human-alien encountersтАФFiction. 3. Space warfareтАФFiction. 4. Mars (Planet)тАФFiction. 5. NovelistsтАФFiction.

Wells is a 2006 science fiction novel by Kevin . nderson under his pseudonym Gabriel Mesta

Wells is a 2006 science fiction novel by Kevin . nderson under his pseudonym Gabriel Mesta.

Wells is a 2006 science fiction novel by Kevin J. Anderson (under his Gabriel Mesta pseudonym). Wells' The War of the Worlds; similar to Anderson's past work, War of the Worlds: Global Dispatches, it recounts the Martian invasion from a variety of viewpoints, and ties into Wells' other work. In the book, Wells himself is the main character, who witnesses the Martian attack alongside his fiancée Jane, Thomas Huxley, and Percival Lowell. Anderson under his pseudonym Gabriel Mesta. Wells' The War of the Worlds similar to Anderson's past work, War of the Worlds: Glob. The War of the Worlds is a science fiction novel by English author H. Wells, first serialised in 1897 by Pearson's Magazine in the UK and by Cosmopolitan magazine in the US. The novel's first appearance in hardcover was in 1898 from publisher William Heinemann of London.

What if the Martian invasion was not entirely the product of .

book by Gabriel Mesta.

Classic science fiction author H. G. Wells's most memorable and compelling novel was arguably The War of the Worlds, made even more famous by the notorious Mercury Theater radio production starring Orson Welles that became the "Night That Panicked America." But what if the Martian invasion was not entirely the product of H. G. Wells's vivid imagination? What if Wells witnessed something that spurred him to write The War of the Worlds not as entertainment but as a warning to the complacent people of Earth? International bestselling author Kevin J. Anderson, writing here as Gabriel Mesta, explores that tantalizing theory in this unique, thrilling novel that expertly evokes the Victorian era. From drafty London flats to the steamy Sahara, to the surface of the moon and beyond, The Martian War takes the reader on an exhilarating journey with Wells and his companions -- and is pure delight from start to finish.
Reviews:
  • Adorardana
I was intrigued when I read the hype for this book, War of the Worlds being the first science fiction novel I read (after wearing out the Classics Illustrated version). I have also read several of "Mr. Mesta's" other books under his real name, so I knew it would move smoothly and have a good historical foundation. I was not disappointed on either account. Much like Nicholas Meyer did for H.G. Wells in the movie "Time after Time", Mr. Mesta injects Wells directly into the story along with his ladylove and propels them along a fast moving track from the halcyon days of college under T.H Huxley to the secret labs of Great Britain as war looms, not with the Martians, but with Germany. Here we meet the prototypes of the rest of Well's protagonists, Griffin, the invisible man, Cavour, who was planning to be one of the first men in the moon, fellows hot on the trail of the food of the gods and lastly Dr. Moreau, the man who wants to help evolution along through surgery. He lays proof of a pending invasion of Mars into their laps and through a series of contrivances that aren't terribly irksome starts a ball rolling that ends up sending Wells and company to the moon, Mars and back again while the coldly intelligent Martians draw their plans against us. While not heavy on science or moral lessons, the book is a fun adventure of what might have been had the events happened as Mr. Mesta described and the interaction between real and fictional characters, including Percival Lowell the astronomer, works pretty well. Purists will scoff at the impossibility of the sciences, but Mr. Mesta, (OK, Mr. Anderson) like Wells himself, isn't trying to be Jules Verne. He's trying to entertain and I think he does a pretty good job.
Andy Nunez, Editor of Against the Odds Magazine
  • Bolanim
A fanciful trip into the world of the fiction of H.G. Wells. If you want something more akin to his style of writing, you will like this book.
  • deadly claw
A nice blending of H.G Wells writings into a fast paced work of fiction. There are plenty leaps of faith as some thing remain unexplained but I did not find that disturbing. The tone is light, somewhat tongue in cheek, and quite enjoyable for a night's reading.
  • Gldasiy
What if H.G. Wells wrote all his stories based on real people he had met, real events he had lived through and real places he had seen. What if he had met the Grand Lunar while on the Moon, gotten his hands on the journal of Dr Moreau, or worked along such men of science as Dr. Griffin, Dr. Cavor, and even T.H. Huxley?

And when he, to his great horror, finds out about the Martians and their plans for Earth, what can he do to stop them?

While I truly enjoyed the book and the way Kevin J. Anderson poured all of Mr. Wells's works together to make a grand novel I feel I would have liked more details about the civilizations on both the Moon and Mars. Yet the author was willing to invent and create many parts of the book on his own - I enjoyed the idea that the Heat-Ray was being used for something else besides war - so he did not allow himself to be trapped by what could only be found in the books. I also enjoyed the mixture of real people, such as Mr. Lowell, with fictional characters, such as Professor Redwood and Mr. Bensington.
  • Siralune
I have to admit, about 1/3 of the way through the book I thought it had taken a nose-dive, but I was wrong! I just needed to reset my expectation. I was quickly "along for the ride" and found "Martian War" a lot of fun. If you like creative fictional mash-ups and especially Victorian era sci-fi and pulpy adventure, this is for you!
  • Malahelm
You know the history but despite this you feel yourself drawn in to a truly ripping yarn
  • Wyameluna
Everything A O K.
It was a good read, with an interesting spin on some of the science, but I kept getting this nagging feeling that I've read it before...