cerkalo
» » Harp

Harp download ebook

by John Gregory Dunne

Harp download ebook
ISBN:
014014210X
ISBN13:
978-0140142105
Author:
John Gregory Dunne
Publisher:
Granta; First UK Edition. edition (March 12, 1990)
Language:
Pages:
235 pages
ePUB:
1570 kb
Fb2:
1822 kb
Other formats:
mobi azw rtf lrf
Category:
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

John Gregory Dunne (May 25, 1932 – December 30, 2003) was an American novelist, screenwriter and literary critic. Dunne was born in Hartford, Connecticut, and was a younger brother of author Dominick Dunne.

John Gregory Dunne (May 25, 1932 – December 30, 2003) was an American novelist, screenwriter and literary critic. He was the son of Dorothy Frances (née Burns) and Richard Edwin Dunne, a hospital chief of staff and prominent heart surgeon. With several siblings, he grew up in a large, wealthy Irish Catholic family. Their maternal grandfather Dominick Francis Burns had founded the Park Street Trust Company.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. An autobiographical essay chronicles the author's Irish Catholic upbringing, its strong influence on him.

by. Dunne, John Gregory, 1932-2003. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by sf-loadersive. org on March 29, 2011.

Author: John Gregory Dunne. Item Condition: Used; Acceptable. John Gregory Dunne's book began as an introduction to a collection of essays, but as he began writing, his brother died a suicide and the death seemed to work as a trigger for so many of the things that followed

Author: John Gregory Dunne. This date is supplied from the publishers data and can be inaccurate. John Gregory Dunne's book began as an introduction to a collection of essays, but as he began writing, his brother died a suicide and the death seemed to work as a trigger for so many of the things that followed.

He was the writer and narrator of the 1990 PBS documentary . is It with John Gregory Dunne, in which he guided viewers through the cultural landscape of Los Angeles

He was the writer and narrator of the 1990 PBS documentary . is It with John Gregory Dunne, in which he guided viewers through the cultural landscape of Los Angeles. He died in Manhattan of a heart attack, in December 2003. His final novel, Nothing Lost, which was in galleys at the time of his death, was published in 2004.

A book that welcomes you in, talks to you wonderfully for a while, takes you into its confidence.

A critically acclaimed best-seller set in the glamorous, gangster-dominated Hollywood of the 1940s tells the story of Blue Tyler, a child star who disappears from Hollywood and becomes a bag lady in New York City. From Publishers Weekly. Fitful, often contradictory memories of a former child film star's decade of fame and the cloaked brutality that surrounded her in the film industry give shape to Dunne's latest, enthralling novel, a tragic tale of behind-the-scenes Hollywood from the '30s to the present.

John Gregory Dunne wrote five other novels–Vegas; True Confessions; Dutch Shea, J. The Red White and Blue; and Playland–and seven works of nonfiction, among which are the memoir-like Harp and two books that look at Hollywood, The Studio and Monster. Born in West Hartford, Connecticut, in 1932, he graduated from Princeton in 1954. He collaborated with his wife, the writer Joan Didion, on many screenplays, including Panic in Needle Park and True Confessions. John Gregory Dunne died in December 2003. Библиографические данные.

His first big book, The Studio (1969), was a work of reportage on a year he spent at the 20th-Century Fox studio

By the late 1980s, John Gregory Dunne, who has died age 71, and his wife Joan Didion were the hottest literary couple in the United States. His first big book, The Studio (1969), was a work of reportage on a year he spent at the 20th-Century Fox studio. Trying to understand the process of movie making, and adopting a cool ironic stance towards the bullying Hollywood vulgarians, he fell in love with the crass, sharp-tongued agents and producers.

An autobiography, travel book, account of being a writer, a way to coming to terms with mortality, this work documents and reflects the author's frenzied and dramatic life.
Reviews:
  • Shan
Good condition, came quickly. Love him and his wife, Joan Didion, both great authors!
  • Moonworm
Terrible book, did not enjoy, a rant from the deceased author.
  • Kelerana
This is a brilliant, brilliant book, deeply insightful about the Irish American experience. I was sorry to see that it is out of print.
  • Gholbirdred
This memoir is a good "companion volume" to Joan Didion's The Year of Magical Thinking, which starts out from her husband Dunne's death from heart failure in 2003, but actually says more about Didion and their daughter than it does about Dunne himself. Harp fills in Dunne's side of it. He wrote it after he was diagnosed with heart disease in 1987 as a way of reviewing his life and, perhaps, a "magical" way of trying to "shore it up" it by making literature of it.
Dunne and Didion are criticized for their egocentricity and selfishness, and they indeed lack interest in modern ethical and/or ecological aspirations like uplifting humanity or protecting nature. Their concern is for their own status and immediate family and economic circle. Yet their story has a genuine tragic quality, because it is about extraordinary people whose pride leads to hubris and to a catastrophic encounter with the mortality that links them to lesser beings. Dunne stresses in Harp how he wants to control life, but there are limits to that. He and Didion are like the archaic protagonists of classical Greek drama, although they are "upward mobility literary nobility" instead of aristocratic rulers-- Hollywood "players," doers of deals. But there's no denying their high status. And they have "archaic" virtues like loyalty and honesty-- they stand by each other in a milieu which offers many opportunities for betrayal.
Didion's Year of Magical Thinking affects readers with "pity and terror," leading to "catharsis." After reading her book and knowing what Dunne's fate will be, Harp can have a similar effect. His descriptions of diagnostic and surgical procedures and attitudes are certainly scary enough-- modern medical technology becomes the machinery of fate instead of ancient oracles and sacrifices. Both "high technology" and "superstitious mumbo jumbo" have a similar hubris-linked function-- dodging the limits of mortality, economic and ecological as well as physical-- and both have their price. In Dunne's case, the price was high-- in anxiety as well as money. His exalted Screen Writer's Guild insurance took care of the money-- as he gloats, indifferent to the soaring insurance costs to which privileged cases like his will contribute--but you can't insure against anxiety and bad luck. Dunne knows-- learns-- that, which gives the book its pity and catharsis side.
  • Taun
I didn't care about him or his illness or his family. Very boring.