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Mexican Days: Journeys into the Heart of Mexico download ebook

by Tony Cohan

Mexican Days: Journeys into the Heart of Mexico download ebook
ISBN:
0767920910
ISBN13:
978-0767920919
Author:
Tony Cohan
Publisher:
Broadway Books; Reprint edition (April 24, 2007)
Language:
Pages:
288 pages
ePUB:
1214 kb
Fb2:
1578 kb
Other formats:
lrf txt docx doc
Category:
Writing Research & Publishing Guides
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.1

Mexican Days relates some of the wisdom that Americans frequently acquire on journeying into Mexico then contrasting it. .The book is a whimsical trot through Mexico, many of locales which were unfamiliar to me, by a man on a literary magazine assignment.

Mexican Days relates some of the wisdom that Americans frequently acquire on journeying into Mexico then contrasting it with their own homeland. Consider this quotation: "In Mexico, your raptures are your own, not prepackaged or branded. The same when things go badly: you're left to your own devices. He weaves personal insight into his travels, revealing more than a travel book's critique of culture and place he captures the spirit of each place he visits so well that photos would seem superfluous.

New York : Broadway Books. Travel writer Tony Cohan recounts his experiences in the small Mexican town of San Miguel de Allende as it is threatened by the invasion of tourists and a Hollywood movie crew. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; toronto.

Tony Cohan’s On Mexican Time, his chronicle of discovering a new life in the small Mexican mountain town of San Miguel de Allende, has beguiled readers and become a travel classic

Tony Cohan’s On Mexican Time, his chronicle of discovering a new life in the small Mexican mountain town of San Miguel de Allende, has beguiled readers and become a travel classic.

Tony Cohan's On Mexican Time, his chronicle of discovering a new life in the small Mexican mountain town of San Miguel de Allende, has beguiled readers and become a travel classic.

Tony Cohan’s On Mexican Time, his chronicle of discovering a new life in the small Mexican mountain town of San Miguel de Allende, has beguiled readers and become a travel classic. Told with the intimate, sensuous insight and broad sweep that captivated readers of On Mexican Time, Mexican Days is set against a changing world as Cohan encounters surprise and adventure in a Mexico both old and new: among the misty mountains and coastal Caribbean towns of Veracruz; the ruins and resorts of Yucatán; the stirring indigenous world of Chiapas; the markets and galleries.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Mexican Days: Journeys Into the Heart of.The writing is wonderful in style and fluency.

The writing is wonderful in style and fluency. Best-selling in Non-Fiction. Told with the intimate, sensuous insight and broad sweep that captivated readers of On Mexican Time, Mexican Days is set against a changing world as Cohan encounters surprise and adventure in a Mexico both old and new: among the misty mountains and coastal Caribbean towns of Veracruz; the ruins and resorts of Yucat.

Tony Cohan’s On Mexican Time, his chronicle of discovering a new life in the small Mexican mountain town of San . Above the hill’s rim, where the road called El Caracol twists down into the town, steely cumuli gathered for their quick, violent nightly assault, cleansing the cobbles and cooling the summer evening before ceding the sky to starlight.

A journey in Mexico So it is with Tony Cohan, who spends much of his time in Mexico

Originally published August 10, 2007 at 12:00 am Updated August 10, 2007 at 2:05 am. With the exception of Paul Theroux, who seems to go everywhere, the best writers of travel narratives frequently specialize in a single place. By. Seattle Times staff. So it is with Tony Cohan, who spends much of his time in Mexico. His latest book is a ramble that begins in Cohan’s Mexican home of San Miguel de Allende. In his latest work, Cohen strikes out across an exotic canvas of less-visited locations, from the jungles of Sierra Gorda and art enclaves of Oaxaca to the Mayan ruins of Palenque.

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Tony Cohan’s On Mexican Time, his chronicle of discovering a new life in the small Mexican mountain town of San Miguel de Allende, has beguiled readers and become a travel classic. Now, in Mexican Days, point of arrival becomes point of departure as—faced with the invasion of the town by tourists and an entire Hollywood movie crew, a magazine editor’s irresistible invitation, and his own incurable wanderlust—Cohan undertakes a richer, wider exploration of the country he has settled in. Told with the intimate, sensuous insight and broad sweep that captivated readers of On Mexican Time, Mexican Days is set against a changing world as Cohan encounters surprise and adventure in a Mexico both old and new: among the misty mountains and coastal Caribbean towns of Veracruz; the ruins and resorts of Yucatán; the stirring indigenous world of Chiapas; the markets and galleries of Oaxaca; the teeming labyrinth of Mexico City; the remote Sierra Gorda mountains; the haunted city of Guanajuato; and the evocative Mayan ruins of Palenque. Along the way he encounters expatriates and artists, shady operatives and surrealists, and figures from his past. More than an immensely pleasurable and entertaining travel narrative by one of the most vivid, compelling travel voices to emerge in recent years, Mexican Days is both a celebration of the joys and revelations to be found in this inexhaustibly interesting country and a searching investigation of the Mexican landscape and the grip it is coming to have in the North American imagination.
Reviews:
  • Hudora
Was an interesting book but I liked his first one better. This one was short stories about the movers and shakers of SMA and leaned towards the older and wealthier residents. I would like to read a book about some of the new expats who are not as wealthy to see what their viewpoints are about the challenges and good times.
  • Ger
Mexican Days is author Tony Cohan’s sequel to his adventurous foray into living in Mexico, in San Miguel de Allende. While this latest intriguing account engages and transports the reader to a new world on its own, the experience is more meaningful after first seeing the author’s life as it unfolds in On Mexican Time. This second volume documents how much can happen in a six-year span and it’s a fascinating look at the transformation of a long popular destination, San Miguel, into something far more. Cohan reflects on how his former refuge had become something of a sensation with a surge in gentrifying real estate developments, upscale shops, and in departing mainstays of the town.

Mexican Days opens with the author’s return to San Miguel, but then ventures afield throughout the “heart” of the country. But something more enters as a subtext. Cohan is more reflective about changes in his life, especially the distancing that has developed with his artist and collaborator wife, Masako Takahashi. He also recognized restlessness in himself, a desire to be “in motion.” An assignment to write about what’s new and exciting in Mexico (and what might appeal to Americans scared of travel further afield after the horrendous shock of 9/11).

Cohan ventures into the more mysterious Sierra Gorda and the “scrambled, unpretty town” of Xilitla. He returns to a hard-edge Mexico City followed by stops in Oaxaca City and Chiapas, and especially to Xalapa. During his travels he muses about his wanderlust, his “purposeful travel.” The reader is privileged to witness this personal quest. I await the next account of Cohan’s travels.

Michael Helquist, author, MARIE EQUI: Radical Politics and Outlaw Passions
  • Alianyau
Don't not buy this book as a travel guide. This is a book about the "state of mind" of Mexico and those drawn to it as much as it describes unique places in the country. The majority of American's knowledge and stereotyping of Mexico are nowhere near the charm, culture and people of Mexico when you meet them in their environment.

I first read Tony Cohan's "A New Life in San Miguel" where he moved in the mid 80s when living in Mexico in the devalued peso era was not very popular. Cohan described the charm of San Miguel to perfection. This book revisits San Miguel during the filming of a movie with Salma Hayek and Antonio Banderas and relevant disruption this causes to his formerly quiet little town. In addition, his town is now overrun with American touristas, who he quietly dislikes and he also blames for runaway housing prices which helps to destroy his quiet little town's character.

An invitation to write an article of unique places to visit in Mexico leads to this book which is not a tourist guide but rather a description of these unique little towns and the effect on the soul of this expatriate American. To further this introspective traveling review, Cohan now goes through the year with minimal time seeing his wife Mosaka, an accomplished author and photographer in her own right who prepares books on Mexican Tile and Mexican color in design and architecture. Thus begins a yearly journey into the soul of Mexico and Tony Cohan.

Cohan visits many towns like Guanajuato, Xilitla, Jalpan, Oaxaca City, Xalapa, Tlacotalpan, Palenque, and Merida. All have their unique charm and geography. Many of these towns he compares to San Miguel twenty years ago before the arrival of the tourists. Some of my favorite stories are of the mountain villages with constant drizzle or chipichipi on the East Coast near the Caribbean Ocean and also the "son jarocho" music festival where Cohan studies the whole history of the music dating back to the early 1900s. But my two favorite stories are of Katanchel in the Yucatan jungle and Palenque. Katanchel is described as an enchanting place which a subsequent tragedy brings into perspective. Palenque is the site of a documentary filming of a famous Mayan ruin. Cohan weaves a great story of lovers, honeymooners, hippies and other members of society who check out into the jungle on their own quest.

This is an excellent internal perspective that Cohan shares with his readers. I strongly recommend that you read "A New Life in San Miguel" first and then the continuation of the journey in this book. There are many parts of this book to discuss but would be giving up the story. In many respects Cohan seems to be enjoying his life but struggling through his personal relationships and his love of Mexico which he doesn't want to see change.
  • Quinthy
Tony Cohan has written better books. I enjoyed (On Mexican Time - A New Life in San Miguel) because I spent a more than a dozen years there on and off since 1975, and knew most if not all the characters he mentioned. But this book just wasn't as sound, as accurate for want of a better word, than On Mexican Time. Parts of it were okay, but as much as you like Tlacotalpan (a beautiful little town south of the port of Veracruz) it is NOT on the Caribbean! I lived in Veracruz for 10 years and am pretty familiar with the state. It was obvious to me Mr. Cohan is much more familiar with Guanajuato.
  • Xtani
I read Tony Cohan's earlier book, "On Mexican Time" after several of my friends had visited and even moved to San Miguel. It inspired me to visit and my wife and I have now been there 3 times, and will be going back soon. In just our short times there, we have also noticed the changes that Cohan points out in "Mexican Days." It is still beautiful and a great place to visit (or live) but much busier and more of a tourist destination than a few years ago.

This new book makes me want to visit other parts of Mexico. It also makes me want to learn more of the history and language. Most of us in the U.S.A. see Mexico only as the poor country to the south and have no idea of how diverse and rich the culture is, how many different ethnic groups make up Mexico, how beautiful and varied the countryside is, and how fascinating and tragic the history is. This book does a great job of telling those stories.

This is a wonderfully written, very personal, account of travels in parts of Mexico that we do not often hear about. I only wish it could have been longer and that Cohan could have written about some of the other places I have heard about, but never visited, such as Morelia, Delores Hidalgo, and the Copper Canyon. Maybe there will be a volume 2. I definitely recommend it to anyone interested in or about to travel to Mexico.