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Korean in a Flash Kit Volume 1 (In a Flash (Tuttle)) download ebook

by Soohee Kim

Korean in a Flash Kit Volume 1 (In a Flash (Tuttle)) download ebook
ISBN:
0804842388
ISBN13:
978-0804842389
Author:
Soohee Kim
Publisher:
Tuttle Publishing; Book and Kit with CD edition (September 10, 2011)
Language:
ePUB:
1434 kb
Fb2:
1943 kb
Other formats:
rtf mobi txt docx
Category:
Foreign Language Study & Reference
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

Part of the bestselling Tuttle In a Flash series, this complete boxed set of Korean.

Korean in a Flash has a full range of features to help begi.

Korean in a Flash has a full range of features to help beginners and intermediate learners alike. Flash cards feature the most commonly used Korean words and phrases.

Tuttle Chinese for Kids Flash Cards Kit Vol 1 Simplified Character By Tuttle Publishing Moore’s clinical anatomy flash . 3: Hsk Upper Intermediate Level" -Philip Lee Yunkin, "Chinese Flash Cards Kit Volume 1: Characters 1-349: Hsk Elementary Level". Посмотреть все изображения.

3: Hsk Upper Intermediate Level" -Philip Lee Yunkin, "Chinese Flash Cards Kit Volume 1: Characters 1-349: Hsk Elementary Level". Books related to Korean in a Flash Kit Ebook Volume 1. Skip this list.

Japanese Hiragana and Katakana Flash Cards Kit: Learn the . This book is a quick and easy way to learn basic Chinese Characters.

Japanese Hiragana and Katakana Flash Cards Kit: Learn the Two Japanese Alphabets Quickly & Easily with this Japanese Flash Cards Kit. 474 Pages·2012·3. 05 MB·9,551 Downloads·New! and practice tips Integrated Chinese: Simplified Characters, Level 1, Part 1 - Ai Wang. 43 MB·8,355 Downloads. Learning Chinese Characters: A Revolutionary New Way to Learn and Remember the 800 Most Basic Chinese Characters. 448 flash cards are included, featuring the most commonly used Korean words and phrases

The cards in this volume contain the most common words and expressions used in daily Korean communication . товар 1 korean flash cards kit - kim, soohee/ kim, woojoo (con) - new mixed media produc -korean flash cards kit - kim, soohee/ kim, woojoo (con) - new mixed media produc.

The cards in this volume contain the most common words and expressions used in daily Korean te nouns as well as verbs and adjectives that form the core Korean vocabulary. These are grouped thematically to enable easy memorisation and retention. A sample sentence is given to illustrate the use of the main word on each card which is often a well-known Korean saying or an idiom. 904,04 rub. Бесплатная доставка.

Korean in a Flash Volume 1 is an excellent new language learning resource for travelers and others who want to learn Korean quickly and easily.Part of the bestselling Tuttle In a Flash series, this complete boxed set of Korean character flash cards aids in recognition, vocabulary learning, review and self-testing. Korean in a Flash has a full range of features to help beginners and intermediate learners alike. 448 flash cards are included, featuring the most commonly used Korean words and phrases. Sample sentences in Korean are provided, along with related terms, frequently-used expressions and extended vocabulary.
Reviews:
  • breakingthesystem
I am Korean-American, knowing Korean as a child from life at home and at a Korean church, but educated in English with degrees from an American university. My mother taught me how to read Korean when I was nine, but I never studied Korean formally. English is my main language. My understanding of Korean is mostly oral and informal, with very little skill in writing.

These cards are a good supplement for someone like myself who can already read and has a basic knowledge of Korean. The cards hit at just the right place. They give me a conscious understanding of what I absorbed growing up, while adding more words that I never learned.

A previous review complained that these cards are too formal and that her Korean boyfriend had never heard of most of these words, but these words are not too formal. I knew 80-90% of them through average home life and the social conversations at church, so these are good words that are actually used in middle-class Korean circles. The box includes terms for family, household, weather, feelings, computer/cell phone, transportation, verbs like "sleep," "run," "walk," "study," adjectives like "slow" or "smart," adverbs like "suddenly," etc. These are simple words.

However, there are many other basic words, like "food" or "pee", that are not included in this pack. If you are a complete beginner, and you are not also using a real textbook or working with an instructor, don't rely on this card set. Only about 30 cards of 450 could be considered genuinely formal. For example, the family-related words will also have a card for "genealogy" which is more advanced, or the weather/nature words include a poetic term for sun. There are terms related to education, like "major", "literature," or "freshman," or to tourists, like "museum" and "taxi-fare," that you wouldn't use everyday at home, but that doesn't make them too formal. Although it's true that an example sentence for a word might be a proverb that you would not use in casual conversation, the words themselves are not too formal on the whole. Among the words that are formal, that is not necessarily a bad thing. Korean language and society have built-in layers of formality that are normal and appropriate among Koreans. If you want to interact in Korean society outside the home, if you do not have at least this level of vocabulary you can come across as rude or immature.

One other note: the words follow a Korean mentality, not an American one. The verbs are particularly well-chosen because they are the verbs most useful and common from a Korean point of view. Not all of them fit the way an American would think or want to express him/herself.

Problems:

A few cards have mistakes on them, such as putting the wrong pronunciation in English beneath the Korean characters, so do not use these cards if you don't already know how to read Korean.

Each card also lists extra vocabulary words at the bottom in tiny print. For example, a card on the word for "body" will list words like face, leg, or arm at the bottom, or "family" will have father, dad, mother, and mom at the bottom. So if you want to learn those other words conveniently, you need to make your own cards for them, since they don't otherwise appear in the pack. But I view this as a flaw, since the point of having flashcards is to have one word per card, easily separated or shuffled so you can test your memory and focus on the terms you choose. (The words-on-the-bottom approach makes more sense for "Chinese in a Flash," where the center of the card shows one Chinese character and the bottom provides examples of words that contain that character. It doesn't work as well in the "Korean in a Flash.")

Finally, the cards follow an odd sequence. The numbers, like one or ten, only come in the 200s, while before that you get words for dandelion, maggot, and jaywalking. Maybe the fact that the education and business words come early in the pack show the intended audience for this product. So expect to do your own sorting and shuffling to learn what you need in the order that makes sense for you.
  • Ironfire
I'm not quite sure how I feel about these flash cards. Don't get me wrong, they're well done and all, but I found it strange that some of the English translation pronunciations were wrong. I asked my Korean friend and she confirmed that a few of the cards were wrong. She told me just to ignore that and remember what sound should actually be made. I do like using them :)
  • Olelifan
Each flash card has five related words on it with one of the words as the major focus. Having associated words really helps me to remember much quicker. I saw someone else complain about having multiple words per card, but after working with them, I see it as a positive feature. I tried to make my own flash cards, but I was struggling to keep them in memory. Once I started working with these cards, I was able to retain the knowledge for a longer period of time. Definitely worth the investment. It is clear that the author put a lot of time and thought into which words to include and how to structure each card. Good quality laminated cards. You do need to have a basic understanding of Hangul and how to pronounce each syllable before you can start working with these cards. Learning how to pronounce each syllable is a rather quick process, but these cards do not cover that.
  • Biaemi
I am an american-born korean trying to learn korean. These are fairly straightfoward flash cards. I like that they give you the word and several other related words on each card. I just wish that the practice sentence that came with each word was a bit more useful. They are pretty out there at times; some are adages that even my friends and family didn't recognize.
  • Jazu
I bought this based on all-positive reviews of the earlier edition, and am glad I did. This is a well-made product, with over 400 cards covering useful Korean vocabulary. (have not listened to the audio CD yet).

I opened it with a group, including some native speakers, and everyone thought it was a nice product. The romanization (pronunciation spelling) will be helpful for people who are just getting used to reading hangul.
  • Saimath
Easy to use and read!
The examples used are also a great way to practice the various readings of the characters shown.
  • Kazijora
Should have a good understanding of vowels and consonants and pronunciation before you order these. It assumes you know all that. Good cards but they do not cover the elementary things.
The cards were good, but I only used them a bit.