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Star-Spangled Manners: In Which Miss Manners Defends American Etiquette (For a Change) download ebook

by Judith Martin

Star-Spangled Manners: In Which Miss Manners Defends American Etiquette (For a Change) download ebook
ISBN:
0393325016
ISBN13:
978-0393325010
Author:
Judith Martin
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company (November 17, 2003)
Language:
Pages:
320 pages
ePUB:
1604 kb
Fb2:
1362 kb
Other formats:
lit mobi rtf doc
Category:
Etiquette
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

This book is what Miss Manners wrote when she was tired of making the same announcements over and over and over again. It's NOT a collection of her newspaper columns. It's a history of manners in America.

This book is what Miss Manners wrote when she was tired of making the same announcements over and over and over again. I have read the entire thing and am thrilled with it. It's funny, but not laugh-out-loud funny

Costumes, props, and sets : the designer life - Publicity and marketing : pitching your persona - A critique : to achieve an even more nearly perfect etiquette.

Star-Spangled Manners book. Judith Martin (née Perlman), better known by the pen name Miss Manners, is an American journalist, author, and etiquette authority. Since 1978 she has written an advice column, which is distributed three times a week by United Features Syndicate and carried in more than 200 newspapers worldwide.

Early North American etiquette books claimed that the manners and customs of the "Best . "Miss Manners" column by Judith Martin, United Features Syndicate, Mar. 17, 2009. "Cover Your Cough - Seasonal Influenza (Flu) - CDC".

Early North American etiquette books claimed that the manners and customs of the "Best Society" could be imitated by all, although some authors lamented that the lower classes, meaning those "whose experience in life has been a hardening process," in fact treated the rules of etiquette with "contempt and. Current etiquette books do not employ the concept. Star-Spangled Manners: In Which Miss Manners Defends American Etiquette (For a Change).

Hailed by George Will as "The National Bureau of Standards," Judith Martin, who has "made etiquette writing an exercise in wit" (Book), recounts here how Americans fashioned this etiquette of egalitarian respect-a fascinating story that spans from the misunderstood origins of our table.

Hailed by George Will as "The National Bureau of Standards," Judith Martin, who has "made etiquette writing an exercise in wit" (Book), recounts here how Americans fashioned this etiquette of egalitarian respect-a fascinating story that spans from the misunderstood origins of our table manners to the much overlooked legacy of African slaves to etiquette.

Star-Spangled Manners: In Which Miss Manners Defends American Etiquette (For a Change) – Электрондук китептин автору: Judith Martin. Бул китепти Google Play Китептер колдонмосу менен компьютерде, android жана iOS түзмөктөрүндө окуңуз. Star-Spangled Manners: In Which Miss Manners Defends American Etiquette (For a Change) китебин оффлайн режиминде окуу үчүн жүктөп алыңыз да, кызыктуу жерлерин белгилеп, кыстармаларды сактап, эскертмелерди жазыңыз.

Star-Spangled Manners: In Which Miss Manners Defends American Etiquette (For a Change) by Judith Martin and Publisher W. W. Norton & Company. Hailed by George Will as "The National Bureau of Standards," Judith Martin, who has "made etiquette writing an exercise in wit" (Book), recounts here how Americans fashioned this etiquette of egalitarian respect-a fascinating story that spans from the misunderstood origins of our table manners to the much overlooked legacy of African slaves to etiquette.

Ultimately, Star-Spangled Manners pays playful homage to the American character, the revolutionary .

Ultimately, Star-Spangled Manners pays playful homage to the American character, the revolutionary roots and creative independence of our newly minted manners. Hailed by George Will as "The National Bureau of Standards, " Judith Martin recounts here with characteristic wit how Americans fashioned this etiquette of egalitarian respect - a fascinating story that spans the misunderstood origins of our table manners to the much-overlooked legacy of African slaves to etiquette. Ultimately, Star-Spangled Manners pays playful homage to the American character, the revolutionary roots and creative independence of our newly minted manners.

In Which Miss Manners Defends American Etiquette (For a Change).

book by Judith Martin. Star-Spangled Manners : In Which Miss Manners Defends American Etiquette (For a Change). Hailed by George Will as "The National Bureau of Standards," Judith Martin, who has "made etiquette writing an exercise in wit" ( Book ), recounts here how Americans fashioned this etiquette of egalitarian respect-a fascinating story that spans from the misunderstood origins of our table manners to the much overlooked legacy of African slaves to etiquette.

STAR-SPANGLED MANNERS. In Which Miss Manners Defends. American Etiquette (For a Change).

"Wonderfully wicked....A bracingly sensible guide to living peaceably together."―Francine Prose, Elle

In this "wryly perceptive, historically informed" (BookPage) new book, America's leading expert on civility reminds her Gentle Readers that when the Founding Fathers created a revolution in the name of individual liberty and equality, they also took a stand against hierarchical European etiquette in favor of simplicity over ceremony, and personal dignity over obsequiousness to our rulers. Hailed by George Will as "The National Bureau of Standards," Judith Martin, who has "made etiquette writing an exercise in wit" (Book), recounts here how Americans fashioned this etiquette of egalitarian respect―a fascinating story that spans from the misunderstood origins of our table manners to the much overlooked legacy of African slaves to etiquette. 10 illustrations
Reviews:
  • Gelgen
This is another of Judith Martin's intelligent but humorous discussions of etiquette. She approaches the topic via history this time, and the result is informative and edifying. Perhaps there is slightly less humor than in some of her other books, but there were several lol spots for me, as well as innumerable smiles and snickers. Evident everywhere is the author's pride in the American manners she wishfully describes.
  • Samulkis
Do you ever wonder whether Miss Manners gets tired of saying the same things over and over and over again?

Just how many times do you suppose she can tell people that it's tacky to demand money from guests, or that you really do need to write an actual letter of appreciation to people (called "hosts") who save you the expense of meals and hotel accomodations when visiting, or that there is no polite way to do something which everyone agrees is rude and which the Gentle Reader specifically intends as an insult?

This book is what Miss Manners wrote when she was tired of making the same announcements over and over and over again. It's NOT a collection of her newspaper columns. It's a history of manners in America.

I have read the entire thing and am thrilled with it. It's funny, but not laugh-out-loud funny. The part of the Gentle Readers is played by the occasional historical characters, who aren't so much writing letters to Miss Manners as writing letters to each other, or getting themselves written up in newspaper accounts, and then leaving these reports carelessly lying around for posterity (us) to read decades and centuries later.

What I liked best about this book was that it made me think about why our approach to teaching "multiculturalism" in public schools hasn't lived up to its promise of better inter-cultural understanding. We teach the trappings -- the secular and religious holidays like Cinco de Mayo or Eid al-Fitr, and occasionally a bit of geography, history, and costuming -- but we ignore the importance of everyday behaviors: Is it rude to look a person in the eye? Is it rude not to? Is it okay to wear short shorts to a funeral? And is that granny with the AARP discount card going to throw a temper tantrum if she thinks that you think that she's over the age of 40?

Miss Manners argues convincingly here that America needs a basic, all-purpose, utilitarian set of behaviors so that people can go to the grocery store or otherwise live their private-public lives in America without offending the other people around them.

I also appreciated the time she spends convincing her readers that there's no such thing as an "etiquette-free" life among humans. Your (and your neighbor's) dress, speech, and actions will always be interpreted as meaning something. She makes a compelling argument that we should collectively give up this notion that body language should be ignored, as well as that misguided notion that carefully chosen clothing styles "to express who I am!" should never be counted against us.

(Apparently Miss Manners has had many letters cross her desk in which people complain that wearing "I'm a thief" clothing [or "I only care about sex" clothing, or "I sell drugs on the side" clothing, or "I'm dirty" clothing, or whatever] makes it harder for them to get hired into positions of trust, among other things.)

Quite a number of reviewers seem to have expected this book to be more like her "Perfect Weddings" or "Excruciatingly Correct Behavior," and it's quite different. This is not an advice book; it's a history and why-we-are-this-way book. It's therefore perfect for the social historian on your gift list, but otherwise you might want to Search Inside and read a bit of this book before you buy.
  • Skillet
It was a good read and funny.
  • Burisi
Miss Manners brings her good breeding and excellent good sense to American manners. And no, that is not an oxymoron, as Miss Manners clearly illustrates. Good humor coupled with good sense makes for an enjoyable trip through modern American etiquette. Highly recommended.
  • BroWelm
You need this book. If you like your etiquette direction spiced with acerbic wit, this is the manual. Judith Martin tempers her advisories with common sense and just enough "Church Lady" snip to consistently amuse.
  • Asyasya
There is much of thoughtful interest in this book. I do think that a more generous use of the comma would have rendered many of her points more quickly accessible to the reader.
  • Aiata
Miss Manners' discussion of American etiquette - by which she means everything from the way we dress and talk and wed to the way we see the world and our place in it - should have been so much better than this. It's certainly ambitious enough, tackling as it does a swath of American culture wide enough to encompass colonial history as well as the modern entertainment industry. Its thesis - that American etiquette, with its emphasis on simplicity and equality, has transformed the world for the better and could continue to do so if it were not hindered by our fascination with show business and popularity and our modern discounting of the communal and familial in favor of the individual - is compelling and well-tuned to the advice Miss Manners gives in her columns.
But something is off about this book. Miss Manners' trademark acerbic tone is replaced by a more serious tenor, perhaps to advance these more serious ideas. The change is not a positive one, as it robs the material of needed zest. Worse, the text is unorganized and often confusing to read. Chapters are quite long, and are divided into page-long sections that often seem unrelated. The book takes no clear trajectory; instead, it constantly jumps around. Its end does not seem like a conclusion, but just the place where Miss Manners grew tired of penning an increasingly unwieldy, uninspiring manuscript and turned her quick wit and intelligent ideas to worthier prospects.