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International Relations Theory: A Critical Introduction download ebook

by Cynthia Weber

International Relations Theory: A Critical Introduction download ebook
ISBN:
0415778425
ISBN13:
978-0415778428
Author:
Cynthia Weber
Publisher:
Routledge; 3rd edition (September 23, 2009)
Language:
Pages:
264 pages
ePUB:
1375 kb
Fb2:
1593 kb
Other formats:
docx lrf mbr lit
Category:
Social Sciences
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.8

Cindy Weber’s International Relations Theory is an extraordinarily au courant text in terms of both its theoretical attunement and its attention to genre.

Cindy Weber’s International Relations Theory is an extraordinarily au courant text in terms of both its theoretical attunement and its attention to genre. Cynthia Weber is Professor of International Relations at the University of Sussex. She is author of several books and numerous articles in the field of International Relations.

Weber’s International Relations Theory, having never studied the subject. A book which expressly aims to. subject IR as a field to deconstruction must necessarily be deficient if a key aspect of. the field is left untouched. Rather, given that this is intended as an introduction to the field, I shall focus on its. pedagogical value to those, particularly postgraduate seminar leaders/tutors, teaching. IR theory at an early stage of their careers.

Request PDF On Jan 1, 2010, Cynthia Weber and others published International Relations Theory: A Critical Introduction By. .

Weber (2001, p. 2) sees IR theories as exercises in descriptive and normative storytelling: " To try to make sense of international politics, we often turn to international relations theory. IR theory makes organizing generalizations about international politics.

Cynthia Weber is Professor of International Relations at the University of Sussex. Библиографические данные. International Relations Theory: A Critical Introduction.

Critical international relations theory is a diverse set of schools of thought in international relations (IR) that have criticized the theoretical, meta-theoretical and/or political status qu.

Critical international relations theory is a diverse set of schools of thought in international relations (IR) that have criticized the theoretical, meta-theoretical and/or political status quo, both in IR theory and in international politics more broadly – from positivist as well as postpositivist positions. Positivist critiques include Marxist and neo-Marxist approaches and certain ("conventional") strands of social constructivism.

Cynthia Weber is Chair of International Studies and Director of the Centre for International Studies, University of Leeds.

International Relations Theory: A Critical Introduction is an innovative new textbook, which introduces students to the main theories in International Relations. It also deconstructs each theory allowing students not only to understand them, but also to critically engage with the assumptions and myths that underpin them. Cynthia Weber is Chair of International Studies and Director of the Centre for International Studies, University of Leeds.

International Relations Theory: A Critical Introduction By: Cynthia Weber Routledge, 2014. In this sense, these myths are what make the stories possible, which are told to appear to be true and to try to make sense of the world. Weber stresses that calling them myths does not indicate that there is a hidden truth to be unveiled: they may be true, and they may be false.

Home Browse Books Book details, International Relations Theory: A Critical. In 2000, Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri published a book called Empire that spoke to the precise moment of international life we were all then living - how to make sense of resistance (especially anti-globalization movements) in an era of globalization.

International relations theory, Paul R. Viotti, Mark V. Kauppi. 5th ed. p. cm. Kenneth N. Walt. 1. Introduction 1. What is game theory? 1. An outline of the history of game BOOK. An Introduction to Game Theory by Martin J. Osborne - International. 95 MB·5,129 Downloads. Theories of International Relations. 07 MB·4,247 Downloads.

International Relations Theory book. It tells us about critical theory of international relation in a fun way. Weber use movies as a tool to explain the theories of international relation

International Relations Theory book. Weber use movies as a tool to explain the theories of international relation. From movies, such as Lords of The Fly, The Truman Show, Independence Day, Wag The Dog, Fatal Attraction, we can see the weaknesses of the theories such as Realism, Liberalism, International Society, Constructivism, and Feminism.

The third edition of this innovative textbook introduces students to the main theories in international relations. It explains and analyzes each theory, allowing students to understand and critically engage with the myths and assumptions behind them. Each theory is illustrated using the example of a popular film.Key features of this textbook include:

discussion of all the main theories: realism and neo-realism, idealism and neo-idealism, liberalism, constructivism, postmodernism, gender, globalization and environmentalism

a new chapter on environmentalism, climate change and Al Gore's An Inconvenient Truth including use of the film WALL-E

innovative use of narratives from films that students will be familiar with: Lord of the Flies, Independence Day, Wag the Dog, Fatal Attraction, The Truman Show, East is East, Memento and WALL-E

an accessible and exciting writing style which is well-illustrated with film stills in each chapter, boxed key concepts and guides to further reading.

This breakthrough textbook has been designed to unravel the complexities of international relations theory in a way that gives students a clearer idea of how the theories work, and of the myths associated with them.

Reviews:
  • Kendis
This is an excellent introduction to international relations theory that is easy to grasp. The novelty is how the author uses film to explain how IR theory works. At the end of each chapter is also a nice summation of the theory and where to go to learn more. I have been using this book for the past two months and have gone back and ready many of the works that she has discussed in her book. It has helped me to understand IR theory, how it works and the debates in the field, and it has helped me with a lot of my assignments, too. Anyone having trouble grasping IR theory should read this and then go back and read some other IR theory introductions (there are some other ones that are a bit more comprehensive -- but sometimes more difficult ot grasp -- such as Making Sense Of International Relations Theory,Theories of International Relations: Fourth Edition, or International Relations Theory (5th Edition) (this book includes many of the works by the original theorists that are appended to the ends of some chapters).

My only complaint about the book was that there was a lack of connection to actual international relations events/happenings. It would have been nice if the author made more connections to real world events. I also didn't enjoy the connection to cinema as much as I thought I would, although it did help me to understand the theory. I often glossed over these sections of the chapters, especially if I felt like the initial explanation made sense to me.

I bought the Kindle version which is nice, but sometimes the tables and graphics disrupt the text a bit.
  • Dibei
Cynthia Weber has presented International Relations students a new way to look at IR theory, tagging the great themes within the field to popular movies that she believes illustrates each of the theories she explores. As a practicing political scientist, I found her insights opened up new ways for me to look at the IR field. I have long been a believer in the so-called "realist" position classically presented by Hans Morgenthau which I studied in the 1960's. This book goes into some detail in areas which never were discussed in those days (feminism in IR, for one), and this book has given me new insight into some of the areas of concern in the discipline now that were ignored when I first began my studies. At the same time, her choice of film analogies is intriguing, and her presentation of how the theories (or "myths," as she terms them) correspond to the films is fascinating. I really like this book and would recommend other International Relations scholars read it, even if only for background, because it is well-written and presents excellent summaries of the various "myths" she discusses.
  • Kelenn
I have been following this outstanding book from its 2nd edition. The 3rd edition is even better.

The book uses film as a tool for addressing fundamental questions (the book eloquently refers to them as "myths") of International Relations and Global Politics. It is very well written and very enjoyable in the Kindle edition (which is the one I bought).

The time you spend reading this book will be time well invested and a lot of fun as you watch the movies from a uniquely different angle.
  • Mopimicr
This book is awfully written, but the author didn't go to school for English I suppose, did she? So boring, nothing is stated clearly and it is written like a diary.
  • Jairani
I got this book because I was taking an advanced international relations theory course and was struggling to understand the complex nature of some of the theories. If you have looked at any of the theories, you know that the standard textbook explanations can sometimes be a little vague and it seems a little hard to wrap my head around the idea of realism, or liberalism.
This book takes a unique approach by relating each theory to a specific movie and using plot points to convey the theories meaning. It was a huge help in figuring out the applications of each theory. I would definitely reccommend this to anyone studying international relations theory. The only reason I'm not rating it 5/5 is because it didn't go over all the theories that I covered in my class, but all the general theories are covered.
  • Visonima
Seriously, though. This is the single worst textbook I have ever been made to purchase and read. I came out of this book with the certainty that the academic field of International Relations Theory is a crock of s***. And even if it weren't Weber's writing makes it seem so. Those portions of this book which don't read like a C grade AP English paper (for reals, the premise of the book is like a bad essay prompt: "How we can relate film X to Y branch of International Relations Theory") read like only the most pompous, biased sort of academia do.
Now, I focused on her treatment of Gender Theory for my term paper in the class I took (taught by a man who is thanked in all of the acknowledgements, cause you know, academics aren't incestuous at all...) and so I will pull my favorite line from that chapter: "What would it mean for gender to be a variable? Gender could be placed and contained in some distinct thing called a variable. This 'gender variable' would itself be outside of gender...". Ah, yes, I see it now, the 'gender variable' is a 'thing called a variable'.
Point being that this book is far from lucid. It is overwrought and overdone and full of itself and presents what are very much loosey-goosey opinion-type issues as fact. Even when she makes sense Weber isn't saying anything worthwhile.
Seriously, if you sign up for a course and this is your text, drop it. Or learn bulls*** and try and convince yourself that it was worthwhile. Then maybe you can be an IR scholar.