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Machiavelli and Empire (Ideas in Context) download ebook

by Mikael Hörnqvist

Machiavelli and Empire (Ideas in Context) download ebook
ISBN:
0521839459
ISBN13:
978-0521839457
Author:
Mikael Hörnqvist
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press (December 13, 2004)
Language:
Pages:
324 pages
ePUB:
1648 kb
Fb2:
1469 kb
Other formats:
doc mbr azw lrf
Category:
Social Sciences
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.5

Mikael Hörnqvist, Uppsala Universitet, Sweden.

Mikael Hörnqvist, Uppsala Universitet, Sweden. Publisher: Cambridge University Press. Machiavelli and Empire.

Machiavelli and Empire book.

Электронная книга "Machiavelli and Empire", Mikael Hörnqvist. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Machiavelli and Empire" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Exploring both the political and intellectual contexts within which Machiavelli's political vision was formed, Mikael Hornqvist stresses the classical and rhetorical character of Machiavelli's thought. He analyzes his preoccupation with glory and liberality in relation to the revival of Roman ideas of triumphalism. Categories: Other Social Sciences\Philosophy.

Series: Ideas in Context. Mikael Hörnqvist challenges us to rethink the overall meaning and importance of Machiavelli’s political thinking. File: PDF, . 9 MB. オンラインで書籍を読む. we can begin to approach this important chapter in the history of Western civilization, we need to gain a firmer understanding of the form of interpretation Nicia failed to develop in La mandragola; in other words, we need to find out what it means to read rhetorically. machiavelli the rhetorician Ever since the revival of rhetoric in the 1950s, the term rhetorical.

Book DescriptionAlan Shepard was the brashest, cockiest, and most flamboyant of Americaand.

Book DescriptionAlan Shepard was the brashest, cockiest, and most flamboyant of Americaand original Mercury Seven, but he was also regarded as the best. Intense, colorful, and dramatic, he was among the most private of Americaand public figures. Book both the political and intellectual contexts within which Machiavelli s political vision was formed, Mikael Hornqvist stresses the classical and rhetorical character of Machiavelli s thought. He analyzes his preoccupation with.

An international team of scholars from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds explores the immediate Florentine context in which Machiavelli wrote, as well as the European republican legacy to which he contributed. Series: Ideas in Context (Book 18). Paperback: 332 pages. This item: Machiavelli and Republicanism (Ideas in Context). There's a problem loading this menu right now.

But does the Machiavelli most of us think we know bear any resemblance to the Machiavelli who lived, pondered, and .

But does the Machiavelli most of us think we know bear any resemblance to the Machiavelli who lived, pondered, and wrote? . In the 24 lectures that make up Machiavelli in Context, Professor Cook offers the opportunity to meet an extraordinarily thoughtful and sincere student of history and its lessons, and to learn that there is far more to him than can be gleaned from any reading of The Prince, no matter how thorough.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Mikael Hornqvist books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Ideas in Context: Machiavelli and Empire Series Number 71. Mikael Hornqvist.

Author: Mikael Hörnqvist The primary context of Machiavelli’s work, H¨ornqvist argues, is not the mirror-forprinces genre o. .

Author: Mikael Hörnqvist. Machiavelli and Empire combines close textual analysis of The Prince and The Discourses with a broad historical approach, to establish the importance of empirebuilding and imperial strategy in Machiavelli’s thought. The primary context of Machiavelli’s work, H¨ornqvist argues, is not the mirror-forprinces genre or medieval and Renaissance republicanism in general, but a tradition of Florentine imperialist republicanism dating back to the late thirteenth century, based on the twin notions of liberty at home and empire abroad.

Exploring both the political and intellectual contexts within which Machiavelli's political vision was formed, Mikael Hornqvist stresses the classical and rhetorical character of Machiavelli's thought. He analyzes his preoccupation with glory and liberality in relation to the revival of Roman ideas of triumphalism. The result is a revealing account of the formation of Machiavelli's characteristic preoccupations.
Reviews:
  • Dishadel
I offer up this review for two reasons. The first is the excellence of Hörnqvist's book in itself.
The second is to offer a different perspective on the work than the reviewer below in that I believe he somewhat misrepresents where this book stands within the field of recent scholarly work on Machiavelli.
Once again, an author wants us to reread Machiavelli by seeing his work in the context of tradition or a history that previous interpretations have ignored. Hörnqvist believes that the most fruitful context in which to ground a reading of Machiavelli is the tradition of what he calls Florentine imperialist republicanism. As opposed to Hans Baron who largely saw Florentine republicanism as a philosophy of liberty, Hörnqvist sees it as a philosophy of expansion.
This expansion serves several purposes not least of which is to give the competing classes and families of Florence a field to strive on other than that of domestic politics. Hörnqvist grounds his claim for this tradition in interesting readings of Bruni and Salutati among others.

I find Hörnqvist's thesis to be almost intuitively powerful in that it speaks to several issues in reading Machiavelli. The first is that it makes perfect sense within the political situation of Florence at the time. The city was surrounded by other military powers far greater than she.
In fact, by Machiavelli's time, Florence did not have an internal tradition of military greatness to rely on. Machiavelli spent much of his time as a political actor trying to get Florence to spend more money/time on developing her own military means.

Secondly, Hörnqvist's reading allows him to explain the relationship between all of Machiavelli's writings in a clear and consistent way. It helps to explain why he constantly looked to the example of ancient Rome as offering the clearest exemplar of how a city could survive/thrive as a republic amidst enemies.

Part of the power of Hörnqvist's reading comes from the method he uses to read. And this is where I am going to differ most from Bo K's review. I have actually read many of Leo Strauss' works (including the one Bo K finds so amusing) and I contend that Hörnqvist has learned far more from Strauss than Bo K did. Hörnqvist suggest a reading of Machiavelli that utilizes three levels of reading because that will enable us to unpack the different levels of Machiavelli's wrintings.

The different approachs that Hörnqvist suggest are rhetorical (and here I would claim his methodology is very Straussian), the ideological (using the methodolgy of Skinner and Pocock) and the philsophical (reading Machiavelli as someone making claims to rational argument). Obviously these three levels intertwine. For example, rhetorical writing will make the claim to be philosophical as a means of disguising its intent or of covering a weak argument.

I should be clear about one claim I am making. I don't think of Hörnqvist as a Straussian. I do think he has learned a lot about how to read from Leaping Leo and uses his methodology as a resource just like he uses Skinner. I cannot emphasize how useful an approach this can be in the right hands. Hörnqvist reads for contradictions, for changes in the use of terminology, for purposefully weak arguments, and all the other little Straussian tricks. He refers frequently to Harvey Mansfield for argumentative support and has read as much of the Straussian writings on Machiavelli as he has the Cambridge writings. Hopefully, most readers will note how Hörnqvist uses both approaches as resources to develope.

Hörnqvist has given us a very compelling work, one that needs to be read by everyone interested in Machiavelli. It is a reading grounded in a broad understanding of Florentine and Renaissance history and thought and can serve as an introduction to different methodologies in the field.

In fact, I think you could do far worse by approaching Machiavelli in the following way. Read The Prince. Always start off with that. Then read Hornqvist and decide where to go from there. Reader Up, people. Then let us know what you think.
  • Wrathshaper
This book takes one of the more central argument's of Hulliung's 'Citizen Machiavelli' and expands on it. Essentially, Hornqvist follows Hulliung in arguing that "the end of Machiavelli's thought is neither the restoration of republican goverment in Florence, nor the liberation of Italy, but greatness, 'the glorious, violent, and aggrandizing deeds that are better performed by republican citizens than monarchical subjects.'"

It is for this reason that Machiavelli is so poorly understood today, viewed as he is merely as a "teacher of evil" which is very far from the truth. As Nietzsche has been slandered, so has Machiavelli; the irony is that in hegemonic US, while the public discourse is latently anti-machiavellian and pro-kantian civility, in its actual practise over the past two centuries it has been an exemplary model of the Machiavellian state in action.

Read Hulliung first, then this book. After you have a strong grasp on current niccolo studies, then you can go read Strauss' "Thoughts on Machiavelli" and play his funny little word- and page-counting games. At least until you faint from laughter at his misreading of Niccolo.