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The Book of Ulster Surnames download ebook

by Robert Bell

The Book of Ulster Surnames download ebook
ISBN:
0856404055
ISBN13:
978-0856404054
Author:
Robert Bell
Publisher:
Dufour Editions (1990)
Language:
Pages:
285 pages
ePUB:
1668 kb
Fb2:
1538 kb
Other formats:
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Category:
Humanities
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.9

There may be other pages missing as well.

Names, Personal, Names, Irish, Names, Irish, Names, Personal, Familienname, Wörterbuch, Northern Irish surnames Etymology & distribution. Belfast ; St. Paul, Minn. There may be other pages missing as well.

It only covers the top names and it generally uses the "definitive" resources for these names, though in some cases he does include local information. - -Nathan D. England.

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Start by marking The book of Ulster Surnames as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This volume has over 500 entries of the most common family names of the province of Ulster, with reference to thousands more

This volume has over 500 entries of the most common family names of the province of Ulster, with reference to thousands more. It gives a history of each name, its original form, where it came from - Ireland, Scotland, England, Wales or France - and why it changed to what it is today. The book also includes notes on famous bearers of the name and where in Ulster the name is now most common. The result is a reference book packed with often surprising insights into the origins of a complex, turbulent people.

Griffin then deftly weaves together religion and economics in the origins of the transatlantic migration, and examines how this traumatic and enlivening experience shaped patterns of settlement and adaptation in colonial America. In the American side of his story, he breaks new critical ground for our understanding of colonial identity formation and of the place of the frontier in a larger empire.

Browsing Books - Irish and Scots-Irish History Books, Genealogy Books, eBooks, DVDs &. Northern Ireland - Home of the Ulster-Scots (aka Scots-Irish) Paternal Hale geneology. North Ireland is a doughnut. Okay, so this title is a bit odd to say the least.

The book of Ulster surnames, Robert Bell. - Belfast ; St. Blackstaff Press, 1988. 13. Matheson, Robert E. (Robert Edwin), Sir, 1845-1926. Special report on surnames in Ireland. Together with Varieties and synonymes of surnames and Christian names in Ireland. - Baltimore : Genealogical Pub. C. 1968.

This book has entries for over five hundred of the most common family names of Ulster.

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The book of Ulster surnames Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The book of Ulster surnames from your list? The book of Ulster surnames.

A handbook to Ulster surnames which has entries for over five hundred of the most common family names of the province, and references to thousands more.
Reviews:
  • GAZANIK
A gently used book as described. Came on time. Appreciate the ease of finding used and out of print books on Amazon. Lots of useful info about the origins of surnames for Those with Irish ancestry
  • Malann
I bought this book for my father. He seemed to like it and used it for a while. It is a good book for researching names.
  • Kekinos
Tracing your ancestors is a time consuming, sometimes frustrating task, but this book helps cut through some of the work by giving you a pointer in the right direction. If it sounds Irish, take a look here and find out.
  • Qwne
Great book of names from Ulster, comes in handy for brick walls.. A must have for any Ulster researcher. Thanks
  • Rare
This book is the right arm for folks attempting to do genealogical research in Ulster. It only covers the top names and it generally uses the "definitive" resources for these names, though in some cases he does include local information. Those wishing additional information on Scottish, Irish, or English names needs to use his bibliography to start researching those in greater detail. The most important aspect of this book is that he shows that often a surname in Ulster can be of Scottish, Irish, or English background. Ie genealogical research is required to determine family origin. You won't learn it by looking it up in a book. However if you think the family is Scottish and find it in a Scottish surname book, you may be misled entirely because the name is also Irish. Or English.
For less common names, buy the CD with Griffiths Index and look it up yerself. This is very easy. You can also other all Irish CDs, for those who object to going to a library. Often the experts who write these books used indexes like Griffiths in composing their books. These resources are now available to us. IGI can be a bit misleading for surnames in Ireland because it doesn't have enough Irish sources to provide an objective look. Griffiths and the Tithe Applotment indexes are generally used.
Linda Merle (Admin - Scotch Irish list on rootsweb)
  • Lli
>>>I agree with the previous reviewer. A while back I ordered this book via Borders with the hope of finding information about the Ulster surnames in my family within: Faloon, Spence, Philpott, Morrow, Dixon & Quail. Of these only Morrow and Dixon were listed. With the exception of Faloon, I believe the rest hail from Scotland during the 17th century. Mr. Bell has left out MANY Ulster surnames which he has deemed 'unimportant' due to the fact of their lesser preponderance in Ulster. Many Americans with rare English or Scottish sounding names who are in fact Scotch-Irish in ancestry and are looking for info. about their surnames in Ulster will be disappointed in this book. Unless you have a name that is widespread and common in Ulster you're regretfully out of luck. Maybe all of us with rare Ulster surnames should get together and compose a book of surnames for people with rare Scotch-Irish family names! {Actually there is an advantage to having a rare Ulster surname--it makes it MUCH easier when researching in Northern Ireland.} --Nathan D. England
  • Mave
This book is about average, with quite a few small discrepancies. The author confuses locations of many Anglo-Scottish Border Clans. For example, he makes no mention of the fact that the Grahams were more numerous on the English side of the Border than the Scottish. He does the same with many other English Riding Clans.
Some of his surname histories are quite confusing. He mentions the use of the surname Scott as a personal name in England, which has nothing to do with the surname Scott in Ireland. He gives histories of many names, but does not directly say how or if these histories apply these surnames as they appear in Ireland. He may mention the appearance of surnames in other countries, but doesn't say the surname in question came from that country.
It's a fair book, it may or may not help you out.
I really like this book because it helped me with finding my family roots and that I have both Irsh and Scotish blood in me.