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Cognition and Commitment in Hume's Philosophy download ebook

by Don Garrett

Cognition and Commitment in Hume's Philosophy download ebook
ISBN:
0195159594
ISBN13:
978-0195159592
Author:
Don Garrett
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; 1 edition (November 28, 2002)
Language:
Pages:
288 pages
ePUB:
1855 kb
Fb2:
1381 kb
Other formats:
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Category:
Humanities
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.7

Home Browse Books Book details, Cognition and Commitment in Hume's Philosophy. Don Garrett demonstrates that such criticisms of Hume are without basis.

Home Browse Books Book details, Cognition and Commitment in Hume's Philosophy. Cognition and Commitment in Hume's Philosophy. The seventeenth and eighteenth centuries saw a renewed interest in exploring the nature of the human cognitive instrument - that is, in understanding the human understanding.

Cognition and Commitment in Hume's Philosophy. Kemp also illustrates Hume's extreme method to avoid both dogmatism and skepticism, the two horns of the philosophers' dilemma that produce a quixotic approach that is uniquely Hume's. Hume (The Routledge Philosophers).

Start by marking Cognition and Commitment in Hume's Philosophy as Want to Read . Garrett's focus on the cognitive psychology of Hume's philosophy is well-argued and an excellent tool in clarifying his ideas

Start by marking Cognition and Commitment in Hume's Philosophy as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Garrett's focus on the cognitive psychology of Hume's philosophy is well-argued and an excellent tool in clarifying his ideas. Does a very good job at highlighting its strengths and limitations, especially in light of modern developments.

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Don Garrett demonstrates that such criticisms of Hume are without basis "Garrett's Cognition and Commitment is a first-rate interpretive study, one that unties a great many interpretive knots.

Don Garrett demonstrates that such criticisms of Hume are without basis. Garrett's Cognition and Commitment is a first-rate interpretive study, one that unties a great many interpretive knots. Garrett seeks mainly to show that Hume's position is internally consistent and to build a portrait of Hume as essentially a cognitive psychologist. Nature and Necessity in Spinoza's Philosophy.

Similar books and articles. Cognition and Commitment in Hume’s Philosophy. Don Garrett - 1997 - Oxford University Press. Antony Flew - 1998 - International Philosophical Quarterly 38 (4):454-455. Timothy M. Costelloe - 2000 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (3):441-442.

Czytając książkę Cognition and Commitment in Hume's Philosophy, zaznaczaj tekst . It is widely believed that Hume often wrote carelessly and contradicted himself, and that no unified, sound philosophy emerges from his writings

Czytając książkę Cognition and Commitment in Hume's Philosophy, zaznaczaj tekst, dodawaj zakładki i rób notatki. It is widely believed that Hume often wrote carelessly and contradicted himself, and that no unified, sound philosophy emerges from his writings.

It is widely believed that Hume often wrote carelessly and contradicted himself, and that no unified, sound philosophy emerges from his writings.

It is widely believed that Hume often wrote carelessly and contradicted himself, and that no unified, sound philosophy emerges from his writings. Don Garrett demonstrates that such criticisms of Hume are without basis. Offering fresh and trenchant solutions to longstanding problems in Hume studies, Garrett's penetrating analysis also makes clear the continuing relevance of Hume's philosophy.
Reviews:
  • Ballazan
If only all philosophers wrote with such lucidity, clarity, and concision! This is a most articulate and descriptive analysis of Hume's thought in context of those who preceded him and detractors who have followed. Garrett is a first-rate apologist, not of the philosopher, but of the cognitive psychologist, David Hume. From the outset, Garrett regards Hume's significant contributions to cognitive psychology as first rate and unparalleled in history. What Garrett shows on this interpretation is that Hume uses the philosophical method to explicate his cognitive psychology.

Garrett first contextualizes Hume in the empirical school of philosophy vis-a-vis the rationalists; experience sola is normative, everything else speculation. But Hume's philosophy is less pronounced than his psychology, which dominates all his thought. Hume intends not to speculate, but observe, and make generalizations about his observations in regards to human understanding, passions, and sentiments - i.e., human nature. Seen in this light, many of the irreconcilable problems philosophers have raised concerning Hume seem to dissipate, and a new appreciation for his cognitive insights become more pronounced.

Garrett's heuristic approach is very Thomistic in tenor and form. Similar to Aquinas, he posits Hume's theories in a brief synopsis, outlines the controversies it has provoked, provides a logical framework to provide answers, and then answers the critics. The first chapter, in addition to a historical context, also established the essential frameworks that Hume works within: (1) Imagination vs. Intellect; (2) the Copy Principle; (3) Evidentiary Inferences; (4) the Five Kinds of Empiricism; (5) the Separability Principle; (6) the Philosophical Method of Cognitive Psychology; and (7) Reason vs. Induction. The remainder of the book examines Hume's central tenets in light of the foregoing: (i) The definitions of `cause;' (ii) liberty and necessity; (iii) on miracles; (iv) personal identity; (v) moral evaluation; and (vi) skepticism and commitment.

Unlike Norman Kemp Smith's excellent, but slightly outdated, "Philosophy of David Hume," written near the middle of the 20th C., Garrett tackles both religion and moral commitment after his exegesis of Hume's epistemology - in the same order as found in Hume's "Treatise on Human Nature." Also unlike Smith, Garrett goes beyond the THN to examine all of Hume's work, where he finds considerable consistency of mind and approach. Also unlike Smith, Garrett is far more deferential to Hume; this book is definitely a defense against the critics. That's not to say Garrett is unabashed in his favoritism; he acknowledges some of Hume's shortcomings. But where possible, Garrett, using the paradigm of cognitive psychology, defends Hume in an intelligent, concise, and elegant manner. I recommend both, starting first with Smith; but if access is limited to only one, let it be Garrett's.
  • Tantil
If you're studying Hume, at least look into this book, it covers a lot of topics and offers original and intelligent interpretations on many crucial points.
  • Alister
`Cognition and Commitment in Hume's Philosophy' by Don Garrett is a combination of new and previously published material by the author.

In examining the work of important historic thinkers there are two common errors to which commentators often succumb; on the one hand, there is the tendency to remove these works from their historic context and present them an easily refuted strawmen, while, on the other hand there is the overly apologetic approach which attempts to paper over any and all oversights, inconsistencies or errors, and transform the works into timeless inerrant pieces of philosophical scripture.

While Garrett makes some token efforts to recognize the limitations of Hume's work, he is well within the camp of commentators seeking to canonize Hume and his writing. Don't get me wrong, I am a fan of Hume and believe him to be a significant contributor to early modern philosophy. I do, however, think there are well documented gaps and inconsistencies in his writing. Indeed, when looking back at his Treatise (written while still in his twenties), even Hume seems to recognize some of its shortcomings.

As with much contemporary philosophy, Garret's work is part of an internecine discussion amongst academics, and as such, is probably only of interest to devotees of Hume. That said, having recently re-read the Treatise and the Enquiries I found Garrett's discussion, if not completely convincing, at least interesting in parts. For example, the chapter on miracles is worth a read. Hume's comments regarding miracles are amongst his most famous and most criticized. Garrett lays out many of the criticisms of Hume's argument and then attempts to reconstruct the miracle argument in a more compelling and coherent manner. Although creative in this regard , Garrett ends up transforming Hume's argument against miracles' in a trivial truism along the lines of "only believe in something if you think you have reason to believe". Garrett's approach and result is similar with respect Hume's position on topics.

On a more mundane level, the soft cover version of the book is difficult to use - the font is tiny (the extensive quotes vanishingly so). Maybe this is less of an issue with young eyes; however, I found it difficult to read.

Overall, while I am a fan of Hume, I would pass on this one - at least at anything close to the list price. At a reduced price (I got mine new for 3$), it may be worth a look for hard core devotees of Hume.