cerkalo
» » The Heretical Archive: Digital Memory at the End of Film

The Heretical Archive: Digital Memory at the End of Film download ebook

by Domietta Torlasco

The Heretical Archive: Digital Memory at the End of Film download ebook
ISBN:
0816681090
ISBN13:
978-0816681099
Author:
Domietta Torlasco
Publisher:
Univ Of Minnesota Press; 1 edition (February 26, 2013)
Language:
Pages:
160 pages
ePUB:
1423 kb
Fb2:
1616 kb
Other formats:
txt docx azw mbr
Category:
Humanities
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.7

Amy Villarejo, author of Film Studies: The Basics Domietta Torlasco is associate professor of French and Italian and comparative literary studies at Northwestern University

Amy Villarejo, author of Film Studies: The Basics. Digital technology allows once quiescent cinemagoers to dismantle and refashion previously inviolable products of the film industry. Torlasco sees the potential for politically transformative thinking in such acts. She argues that our capacity to imagine alternative futures may depend on our ability to reconfigure the virtual archive of filmic memory. Domietta Torlasco is associate professor of French and Italian and comparative literary studies at Northwestern University. She is the creator of the digital film Antigone’s Noir and the author of The Time of the Crime: Phenomenology, Psychoanalysis, Italian Film.

The Heretical Archive book. Indeed, such works define a notion of archiving not The Heretical Archive examines the relationship between memory and creation in contemporary artworks that use digital technology while appropriating film materials.

Book · January 2013 with 4 Reads. How we measure 'reads'. Cite this publication.

Upload a copy of this paper Check publisher's policy Papers currently archived: 42,172. Similar books and articles. The Neuro-Image: A Deleuzian Film-Philosophy of Digital Screen Culture. From the Publisher via CrossRef (no proxy).

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station09. cebu on January 8, 2020. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

The Heretical Archive examines the relationship between memory and creation in contemporary artworks that use digital technology while appropriating film materials

The Heretical Archive examines the relationship between memory and creation in contemporary artworks that use digital technology while appropriating film materials.

Books Book Series Journals Podcasts Videos. Journals · Leonardo · Volume 47, Issue 3. Leonardo Volume 47, Issue 3 June 2014 112 pages ISSN 0024-094X E-ISSN 153282. The Heretical Archive: Digital Memory at the End of Film by Domietta Torlasco. University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis, MN, 2013.

The Heretical Archive: Digital Memory at the End of Film by Domietta Torlasco. Visual Studies 30 (2), 223-224, 2015. Journalism 15 (8), 1129-1131, 2014.

216 pp. Torlasco, Domietta. The Heretical Archive: Digital Memory at the End of Film. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2013. 152 pp. 265. 266 Books of Critical Interest. Vasquez, Alexandra T. Listening in Detail: Performances of Cuban Music.

Help us to make General-Ebooks better! Genres. Books ~~ Art~~ Film & Video.

The Heretical Archive examines the relationship between memory and creation in contemporary artworks that use digital technology while appropriating film materials. Domietta Torlasco argues that these digital films and multimedia installations radically transform our memory of cinema and our understanding of the archive. Indeed, such works define a notion of archiving not as the passive preservation of audiovisual signs but as an intervention and the creative rearticulation of cinema’s perceptual and political textures.

Connecting psychoanalysis, phenomenology, and feminist theory in innovative ways, Torlasco analyzes cutting-edge digital works that engage with the past of European cinema and visual culture, including video installations by Monica Bonvicini (Destroy She Said) and Pierre Huyghe (The Ellipsis), Agnès Varda’s film The Gleaners and I, Marco Poloni’s multimedia installation The Desert Room, and Chris Marker’s CD-ROM Immemory.

Torlasco’s central claim is that if the archives of psychoanalysis and cinema have long privileged the lineage that runs from Oedipus to Freud, the archives of the digital age—what she calls the “heretical archive”—can help us imagine an unruly, porous, multifaceted legacy, one in which marginal figures return to speak of lost life as much as of life that demands to be lived.