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Reverse Mentoring: How Young Leaders Can Transform the Church and Why We Should Let Them download ebook

by Earl Creps

Reverse Mentoring: How Young Leaders Can Transform the Church and Why We Should Let Them download ebook
ISBN:
0470188987
ISBN13:
978-0470188989
Author:
Earl Creps
Publisher:
Wiley; 1 edition (September 29, 2008)
Language:
Pages:
240 pages
ePUB:
1796 kb
Fb2:
1225 kb
Other formats:
lrf doc docx txt
Category:
Humanities
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.6

And why should we founts of wisdom evenconsider it? Earl Creps provides us with a compelling answer inreverse . Earl has done us a great service

And why should we founts of wisdom evenconsider it? Earl Creps provides us with a compelling answer inreverse mentoring. This is a must read for all generations who loveChrist's church. Aubrey Malphurs, Lead Navigator-The Malphurs Group andSenior Professor-Dallas Seminary. And I thought I was cool, that I had put the "hip" back indiscipleship. Earl has done us a great service. I trust this book will find its way into the hands of men and women who will rise to the call issued by Earl to engage in the conversation, to run with the herd and experience the excitement of embracing those things that excite the next generation.

Reverse Mentoring book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Reverse Mentoring: How Young Leaders Can Transform the Church and Why We Should Let Them.

Earl Creps is known for his work in connecting the younger generation of postmoderns with their Boomer predecessors. The author of Off-Road Disciplines, Creps, in this new book, takes up the topic of how older church leaders can learn from younger leaders who are more conversant with culture, technology, and social context.

Creps, Earl G. Reverse mentoring : how young leaders . This book is about the ways in which young and old leaders can serve each other through a relationship called reverse mentoring

Creps, Earl G. Reverse mentoring : how young leaders can transform the church and why we should let. them, Earl Creps. Church Unique: How Missional Leaders Cast Vision, Capture Culture, and Create Movement, by Will Mancini. A New Kind of Christian: A Tale of Two Friends on a Spiritual Journey, by Brian D. McLaren. This book is about the ways in which young and old leaders can serve each other through a relationship called reverse mentoring. The concept of mentoring takes its name from The Odyssey, the Greek epic in which Mentor appears as the person responsible for guiding Odysseus’ son as the father goes off to war.

How Young Leaders Can Transform the Church and Why We Should Let Them.

Reverse Mentoring: How Young Leaders Can Transform the Church and Why We Should Let Them. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass/ Leadership Network, 2008. Off-Road Disciplines: Spiritual Adventures of Missional Leaders. San Francisco: Leadership Network/Jossey-Bass, 2006. Postmodern Pentecostals?: Emerging Subcultures Among Young Pentecostal Leaders. In The Future of Pentecostalism in the United States, eds. Edwin Rybarczyk and Eric Patterson.

Reverse Mentoring by Earl Creps is a handbook that I will keep on my current reading bookshelf for reference. When I was in business a few years ago and trying to understand the internet and how it would eventually impact our business model, I would often engage young men and women in conversation about various aspects of the net and quickly it was apparent that my thoughts were geared to the economic business model and their perspective was a community or social. That is a big difference.

And, funny enough, Earl blames (among other things) me and some pancakes for his journey toward church planting in Berkeley. The book comes out of the influence that younger friends have had on me. It recommends that older leaders turn to the young as students rather than teachers. Ed: Obviously, the word "missional" is spoken of, used by, and claimed by many groups.

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Why your business isn't succeeding and what you can do about it While business consultants are having you scour over profit and loss statements, the real truth is businesses don't fail; people quit. The Way You Do Anything Is the Way You Do Everything offers a realistic, sarcastic, and fiercely honest look at how business owners fail to commit. Jonathan Estes in Smart Green turns this need into value and lays out the steps for going green. Read it and get ahead of your competition and the green tsunami sweeping the country.

Earl Creps is known for his work in connecting the youngergeneration of postmoderns with their Boomer predecessors. Theauthor of Off-Road Disciplines, Creps, in this new book,takes up the topic of how older church leaders can learn fromyounger leaders who are more conversant with culture, technology,and social context. In addition to making the benefits of what hecalls "reverse mentoring" apparent, he also makes it accessible byoffering practical steps to implement this discipline at bothpersonal and organizational levels, particularly in communication,evangelism, and leadership.

Creps' new book is a topic of interest both inside and outsidethe church as older leaders realize that they're not "getting it"when it comes to technologies (iPod, IM, blogging) or culturalissues such as the fact that younger people see the world in anentirely different way. Creps has been personally involved inreverse mentoring for several years and has spoken and written onthe subject extensively. He has pastored three churches (oneBoomer, one Builder, on X'er) and is currently a church planter inBerkeley, California. He has also served as a consultant and and aseminary professor and administrator, holding a PhD inCommunication Studies and a D.Min. from the Assemblies of GodTheological Seminary.

Reviews:
  • Skrimpak
The author offers practical witness as well as insights into the pluses and those things which block the growth of this most useful concept. The 21st Century challenges all of us to new ways of seeing, new paths for action and new ways of being in ministry together. Here we are invited to join a reflection on what changes we need to consider, what conversations could lead to more productive interaction and growth both personally and spiritually. Fostering friendship amongst professional would appear to be a clear path to discovering the giftedness of each and find better means to engage our mutual gifts and enter into a space where we can all have access to the totality of the well of wisdom.
  • Diredefender
I have been thinking about mentoring for some time. I was excited to see this book, which really expanded upon a chapter of his very excellent book, Off-Road Disciplines. Reverse Mentoring by Earl Creps is a handbook that I will keep on my current reading bookshelf for reference.

When I was in business a few years ago and trying to understand the internet and how it would eventually impact our business model, I would often engage young men and women in conversation about various aspects of the net and quickly it was apparent that my thoughts were geared to the economic business model and their perspective was a community or social model. That is a big difference. Depending on where you start in the conversation you can find yourself in the center of the action or way out in left field. Earl provides "road signs" along the way of this whole R-Mentoring process.

In Reverse Mentoring, Earl points out that many, either do not want to push themselves out of their comfort zone or are fearful of looking like they are stupid about things that are intuitive to the rising generations. Any hope of maintaining relevance depends upon allowing ourselves to be mentored by young men who are wise about things that with every passing day we run the risk of becoming obsolescent. Earl has done a good job of putting in one volume principles and ideas that will serve those of us who have a desire to speak into the hearts of the next generation by allowing to them to speak into our hearts. This guide book is like a manual for someone who is about to engage in foreign missions.

Earl was gracious to use some quotes of mine from a blog entry I wrote on this topic. As I said in that entry, "Every day I get a little more disconnected unless I intentionally work at staying connected." (p21) Further as I said when we allow ourselves to be transparent to the next generation it is "easy to think that things change so rapidly just to keep me [us] off balance or on the edge of the conversation." (p78) This is rarely the case, though we must exercise some common sense, there probably some things that we should allow to be exclusively their domain - no need to look stupid trying to be something we are not. I really do believe that the story of Elisha and Joash in 2 Kings 13 provides a glimpse of inter-generational strength and wisdom working together. I summarized that interaction as follows, "Young and old, old and young working together taking advantage of the strengths that both have to offer...I am willing to submit to the next generation to learn from them the things I should and trust that I will be able to impart the few things I have gleaned in living life. Life on life investing in the lives of a few. What could one give himself to that would compare to this?" (p183)

Throughout the book, Earl provides real world illustrations of how R-mentoring might work itself out for those who have the desire to join in this exciting endeavor. For me the principles in this book are working themselves out in my life as I allow Carson Peterson, Jason Rodriguez, Lane Moon, Brad Wolfrom, Scott Hamilton, Martin Elvington and Eugen Cozonac to speak into my heart and have the permission to challenge me when necessary. In the short time that I have been with these men, they are shaping me and equipping me to maintain connectedness in this very dynamic world in which we live. When I press them, they return the favor and they are fast becoming my friends.

One of my big takeaways from this very important book, is that we must take this challenge, and if we are to be successful we must allow humility to temper our interactions with the next generation. Earl has done us a great service. I trust this book will find its way into the hands of men and women who will rise to the call issued by Earl to engage in the conversation, to run with the herd and experience the excitement of embracing those things that excite the next generation. When we find ourselves at that point we may then have the privilege of speaking into their hearts when their souls are in the grip of fear. Life on life, there is no bigger nor better call.
  • Ger
If I could give this negative stars I would. We had to read one chapter for a seminary class on multigenerational ministry. The author's advice that boomers should admit "Im not cool, I don't get it, I need help" is laughable and dangerous. The church is not supposes to be cool people. Think about it. This is pure garbage social theory seeping its way into the American church that is already anemic and sick.