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The Vietnam War: A Concise International History (Very Short Introductions) download ebook

by Mark Atwood Lawrence

The Vietnam War: A Concise International History (Very Short Introductions) download ebook
ISBN:
0199753938
ISBN13:
978-0199753932
Author:
Mark Atwood Lawrence
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; 1 edition (July 23, 2010)
Language:
Pages:
224 pages
ePUB:
1421 kb
Fb2:
1916 kb
Other formats:
lrf doc lit azw
Category:
Humanities
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.5

In this concise history of the Vietnam War, Mark Lawrence does a masterful job of transforming a highly complex and .

In this concise history of the Vietnam War, Mark Lawrence does a masterful job of transforming a highly complex and controversial subject into a brilliant and balanced histoire synthèse. -Christopher Goscha, Universite du Quebec a Montreal. This book might be even more attractive than the larger volumes on the subject because it is succint and focuses.

In this concise history of the Vietnam War, Mark Lawrence does a masterful job of transforming a highly complex and . -Christopher Goscha, Université du Québec à Montréal.

The Vietnam War remains a topic of extraordinary interest, not least . Mark Atwood Lawrence is Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin.

The Vietnam War remains a topic of extraordinary interest, not least because of striking parallels between that conflict and more recent fighting in the Middle East. as well as global history.

Mark Atwood Lawrence is one of our leading scholars of the international .

Mark Atwood Lawrence is one of our leading scholars of the international history of the war, and he shows it here, compiling a superb and wide-ranging sourcebook that provides crucial insight into the aims and policies of all sides in the conflict. -Fredrik Logevall, author of Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam. He is the author of The Vietnam War: A Concise International History (OUP, 2008) and Assuming the Burden: Europe and the American Commitment to War in Vietnam (2005).

The Vietnam War book. Start by marking The Vietnam War: A Concise International History (Very Short Introductions) as Want to Read

The Vietnam War book. Start by marking The Vietnam War: A Concise International History (Very Short Introductions) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This is what Mark Atwood Lawrence accomplishes in his 224 page book The Vietnam War: A Concise . Mark Atwood Lawrence is a former correspondent for the Associated Press and Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin

This is what Mark Atwood Lawrence accomplishes in his 224 page book The Vietnam War: A Concise International History. Mark Atwood Lawrence is a former correspondent for the Associated Press and Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin. His book Assuming the Burden (2007) won the George Louis Beer Prize and Paul Birdsall Prize of the American Historical Association.

by Mark Atwood Lawrence. series Very Short Introductions. Books related to The Vietnam War:A Concise International History. Finally, Lawrence examines the aftermath of the war, from the momentous liberalization-"Doi Moi"-in Vietnam to the enduring legacy of this infamous war in American books, films, and political debate.

In The Vietnam War, Mark Atwood Lawrence draws upon the latest . Moreover, the book carefully considers both the long- and short-term origins of the war.

as well as global history. While focusing on American involvement between 1965 and 1975, Lawrence offers an unprecedentedly complete picture of all sides of the war, notably by examining the motives that drove the Vietnamese communists and their foreign allies. The Vietnam War remains a topic of extraordinary interest, not least because of striking parallels between that conflict and more recent fighting in the Middle East.

Pp. 185+notes and index. isbn978 0 19 531465 6. - Volume 43 Issue 3 - JAMES M. CARTER. Pp. 232. isbn978 0 1. - Volume 47 Issue 3 - WALTER HIXSON.

The Vietnam War remains a topic of extraordinary interest, not least because of striking parallels between that conflict and more recent fighting in the Middle East. In The Vietnam War, Mark Atwood Lawrence draws upon the latest research in archives around the world to offer readers a superb account of a key moment in U.S. as well as global history. While focusing on American involvement between 1965 and 1975, Lawrence offers an unprecedentedly complete picture of all sides of the war, notably by examining the motives that drove the Vietnamese communists and their foreign allies. Moreover, the book carefully considers both the long- and short-term origins of the war. Lawrence examines the rise of Vietnamese communism in the early twentieth century and reveals how Cold War anxieties of the 1940s and 1950s set the United States on the road to intervention. Of course, the heart of the book covers the "American war," ranging from the overthrow of South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem to the impact of the Tet Offensive on American public opinion, Lyndon Johnson's withdrawal from the 1968 presidential race, Richard Nixon's expansion of the war into Cambodia and Laos, and the problematic peace agreement of 1973, which ended American military involvement. Finally, the book explores the complex aftermath of the war--its enduring legacy in American books, film, and political debate, as well as Vietnam's struggles with severe social and economic problems. A compact and authoritative primer on an intensely relevant topic, this well-researched and engaging volume offers an invaluable overview of the Vietnam War.
Reviews:
  • Agalas
We used this book for study in our men's group at Church. Most of us were around during this time. Many memories, most not very good. We chose this book to complement Ken Burns's The Vietnam War. The theme of both correlated, though some of the details were a little off.
  • Hystana
This book will be of great service for laypeople interested in a concise and wide-ranging overview of the Vietnam War. In fact, it would also be a good, safe choice for college history instructors looking for a short text to use in undergraduate classes on the Vietnam War or U.S. foreign relations. A big plus of this book is that Lawrence frames his story widely, giving considerable room for discussion of French colonialism in Vietnam, World War II, and the origins of U.S. involvement, which make up about 1/3 of the book. A second plus is that he provides views from all sides of the conflict, not just the view from Washington. We learn quite a bit about power struggles and disagreements over strategy within the North Vietnamese communist party and with its allies in China and the Soviet Union. For example, it was the big communist powers who pushed Hanoi to accept the 1954 Geneva accord out of fear of provoking U.S. intervention at a time they felt they could not match U.S. power. In his judgment of U.S. policies, Lawrence is solidly in the orthodox camp, repeatedly pointing out that despite short-term successes of U.S. economic aid to the Diem regime, it was doomed due to its internal corruption. The same argument is used to evaluate U.S. military tactics: Successes on the battlefield petered out due to a fundamental flaw in strategic assumptions. Revisionists such as Mark Moyar will surely disagree, but Lawrence does represent the majority opinion among U.S. historians at the moment.

The book has no major flaws, but Lawrence's prose isn't exactly lively. At times "The Vietnam War" reads like a textbook. Given its brevity, the book merely alludes to topics such as the experience of soldiers, the effects of chemical warfare, the war in American and Vietnamese memory, etc. But then again, that's when the "for further reading" essay comes in extremely handy. As a solid foundation for further exploration of this major conflict--whether in a classroom or at private leisure--this short text does the job well.
  • Uris
I grew up with the words "From Saigon" on the evening news. I was 25 when Saigon fell to the North Vietnamese.

I realized recently, that I knew nothing about the War in Vietnam other than the media presentation at the time. I started looking for a reasonably short, readable history of the war that did not project someone's political agenda.

This book filled that need. The author did not editorialize much (refreshing in today's journalistic world where fact and opinion get blurred by writers).

It did not answer the big question for me: why did 58,000 American troops have to die in Vietnam? Of course, that would be a matter of opinion. It did provide perspective about the world events that surrounded the war and put it into context for me.

I would recommend it to anyone looking for some knowledge of this war that so changed the landscape of US politics.
  • Jorius
Well written, it is historic and a yet told in way you want to hear the story. Mr. Lawrence does have a way at combining both what you learned in history class (which is boring) and the ability to tell a story (which is exciting). I did have to read this for a history class, but it was so well written I decided to keep it. It is one of my favorite books. If all history writers could write like this than history books would go flying off the shelves. It is strong writing you can almost feel the humidity from the jungle and smell the food.
  • Neol
Overall, this book does exactly what it sets out to do and it does it very well. My only issue with reading this book was that historical figures/important people are only really introduced once and there are no reminders about who they are after. At first, it was difficult to re-find where certain people were first introduced to remind myself who they were, but then I remembered Google exists. Aside from that small issue the book is great.
  • HappyLove
Short and concise the author gives the novelist historian a basic understanding of the many problems that plagued the American leadership
  • Ytli
An excellent review of the war from many perspectives--the three governments involved: U.S., North Vietnam, and South Vietnam. This book should be studied in all military schools with the goal to be understanding global cultures and lands. We must learn how to negotiate!
Well written and researched, yet is short and concise. This book looks to write about the Vietnam wars from a "international history" perspective which gives a reader a very good big picture view of the era. Which is quite a accomplishment due to the long and complicated history of the Vietnamese and foreign powers involved in this piece.