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A Social History of the Deccan, 1300-1761: Eight Indian Lives (The New Cambridge History of India) download ebook

by Richard M. Eaton

A Social History of the Deccan, 1300-1761: Eight Indian Lives (The New Cambridge History of India) download ebook
ISBN:
0521716276
ISBN13:
978-0521716277
Author:
Richard M. Eaton
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press (March 10, 2008)
Language:
Pages:
236 pages
ePUB:
1523 kb
Fb2:
1606 kb
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Category:
Humanities
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.6

Eaton elegantly vindicates his decision to chronicle social history through the lives of extraordinary people. Michael Neale Source: Asian Affairs

Richard Eaton recounts the history of the Deccan plateau from the fourteenth century to the rise of European colonialism. Tarabai ((1675-1761) is Queen of the Marathas and lives at a time when Maratha power peaks.

Richard Eaton recounts the history of the Deccan plateau from the fourteenth century to the rise of European colonialism. He does so, vividly, through the lives of eight Indians who each represented something particular about the region. Characters include a merchant, a general, an African slave, a poet, a bandit and a female pawn-broker. Even the Mughal Emperor is eventually controlled by the Marathas but they themselves are not unified.

It replaced The Cambridge History of India published between 1922 and . Eaton, Richard M. (2005).

It replaced The Cambridge History of India published between 1922 and 1937. The new history is being published as a series of individual works by single authors and, unlike the original, does not form a connected narrative. Also unlike the original, it only covers the period since the fourteenth century. The whole has been planned over four parts: Pt. I The Mughals and their Contemporaries. A Social History of the Deccan, 1300-1761 Eight Indian Lives. p. 236. Indian States and the Transition to Colonialism. Bayly, Christopher Alan (1988). Indian society and the making of the British Empire. 225. Marshall, P. J. (1987).

The New Cambridge History of India series. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2005 The Indian Princes and Their States. By RamusackBarbara . . Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2005. Article in Canadian Journal of History 42(2):375-377 · September 2007 with 155 Reads. How we measure 'reads'. The Indian Princes and Their States.The New Cambridge History of India, vol. 3, bk. 6. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Volume 64 Issue 3 - Edward S. Haynes.

Richard Eaton’s A Social History The challenge in reading history is that it could easily become a mind-numbing . The book is part of a series of books that forms The New Cambridge History of India and is placed in the volume concerning the Mughals

Richard Eaton’s A Social History The challenge in reading history is that it could easily become a mind-numbing series of who blinded, deposed, imprisoned, or married whom, with names, places and dates running into one another. The book is part of a series of books that forms The New Cambridge History of India and is placed in the volume concerning the Mughals. However, many of the characters pre Dr. Richard Eaton is a major authority in medieval Indian history who has significantly influenced the field.

He does so through the lives of eight Indians who lived at different times during this period .

He does so through the lives of eight Indians who lived at different times during this period, and who each represented something particular about the Deccan. In the first chapter, for example, the author describes the demise of the regional kingdom through the life of a maharaja. He does so through the lives of eight Indians who lived at different times during this period, and who each represented something particular about the Deccan.

product description page. A Social History of the Deccan, 1300-1761 - (New Cambridge History of India) by Richard M Eaton.

Their stories are woven together into a rich narrative tapestry, which illuminates the most important social processes of the Deccan across four centuries and provides a much-needed book by the most highly regarded scholar in the field. product description page. Shipping & Returns.

A Social History Of The Deccan, 1300-1761: Eight Indian Lives, Richard Eaton, Cambridge University Press (2005). In A Social History Of The Deccan, 1300-1761: Eight Indian Lives, historian Richard Eaton does a great job of telling a good tale. Yet this choice of characters probably says more about the melting pot that was the Deccan of the 14th-17th century than all the other books we’ve read. While history is written by victors, social history of the kind Eaton has pursued reveals history to be far more textured and nuanced.

Автор: Richard M. Eaton Название: A Social History of the Deccan, 1300–1761 Издательство: Cambridge . He does so, vividly, through the lives of eight Indians who lived at different times during this period, and who each represented something particular about the Deccan.

He does so, vividly, through the lives of eight Indians who lived at different times during this period, and who each represented something particular about the Deccan.

In this fascinating account of one of the least known parts of South Asia, Richard Eaton recounts the history of the Deccan plateau in southern India from the fourteenth century to the rise of European colonialism. He does so, vividly, through the lives of eight Indians who lived at different times during this period, and who each represented something particular about the Deccan. Their stories are woven together into a rich narrative tapestry, which illuminates the most important social processes of the Deccan across four centuries and provides a much-needed book by the most highly regarded scholar in the field.
Reviews:
  • hulk
Very well written. Up to date. Fascinating history. So glad he wrote it.
  • Grotilar
I like history and, more importantly, I like the subaltern style of history-writing, which focuses not only on the nobility of a certain time but "small people" too. I really liked this book because it does a great job of capturing a wide spectrum of historical lives in the period covered by the book, not just kinds and chiefs.

Case in point, I previously read History of the the Maratha People by Kinkaid, which deals with more-or-less the same geographic region covered by Eaton's book. However, Kinkaid's story telling follows a straight line path from one king to the next one. By contrast, Eaton's story telling jumps between kings and generals to poets and social revolutionaries. Along the way, Eaton does a great job of painting a picture of the culture and society of the time.
  • Nilasida
This is a study of a neglected part of India, the Deccan. Eaton covers the period from about 1300 to the 1700's in about 200 pages and does so through the study of the lives of eight outstanding individuals who stood at the centre of some of the key events of Deccani history.

The first is the last Medieval Hindu king of coastal Andhra Pradesh, Pratapa Rudra (1289-1323) who heroically but in the end unsuccessfully resists the conquering armies of the Delhi Sultanate. The king commits suicide on his way to Delhi as a captive rather than endure the indignity of captivity. Conventionally seen as the time of the end of "Hindu" India and the beginning of "Muslim" rule, Eaton paints a picture of a more complex transition from an order based on regional States to one based on a Pan-Indian medieval empire that incorporates and co-opts into its power structure local Hindu elites.

The second life is that of a sufi holy man Muhammad Gisu Daraz (1321-1422) who came with North Indian immigrants to the Deccan fleeing the ravages of Timurlane. He settles in one of the States formed in the Deccan during the break up of the Pan-Indian Delhi sultanate. He belongs to the Sufi tradition that weaves a distinctly subcontinental form of Islam, accommodating itself with the local environment and culture and confers spiritual legitimacy on newly established Muslim states in the Deccan.

The next subject is Muhammad Gawan (1411-1481) a Persian immigrant who rises to prominence as the prime minister of Bidar, a Sultanate in the Deccan. Gawan represents Persian court culture that forms a common elite political culture through India, Iran and Timurid Central Asia. He also was once a merchant and presides over a vibrant international trade linking peninsular India with the Middle East and Central Asia. Perilously straddling the sometimes bitter divisions between immigrants from the West (Persia and Central Asia) and the "Deccanis" (Muslims of North Indian origin), Gawan is eventually executed on charges of treason trumped up by his Deccani opponents.

The narrative then moves to sketch the life of Rama Raya (1484-1565), the great general of Vijayanagar and founder of its last dynasty, the Aravidus. The State he leads has established itself as the pre-eminent State in South India, arbitrating the affairs of the Sultanates to its north, and playing a game of divide and rule. The state shares in the Persianised court culture of the Muslim rulers to its north engaging in diplomatic relations with Central Asia and the newly arrived Portuguese. The Emperors of Vijayanagar style themselves as "Sultans among Hindu Rajas". Rama Raya in the end overreaches himself in antagonizing all of his northern neighbours and eventually, they unite to defeat him at the Battle of Talikota in 1565. Though Vijayanagar later came to be seen as Hindu bastion against Muslim encroachment, the reality was one of participation by Vijayanagar in the greater Islamic world sharing in its cultural norms and trade networks.

The next life in the study is of Malik Ambar (1548-1626), an Ethiopian slave who rises to be a leader of the State of Ahmednagar. The study of Ambar's life highlights the institution of military slavery where African slaves were brought to India to serve as soldiers. Rulers unable to trust their own preferred to rely on slave armies. Sometimes, the slave-soldiers could and did obtain significant political power. Ambar successfully resists the rising power of the Mughals in Northern India. The descendants of African slave soldiers over time cease to maintain a distinct identity and eventually merge into Indian society, as did many others before them, such as the Greeks in ancient times.

Next comes Tukaram (1608-1649), the great Marathi poet and saint. He preaches an equalitarian message that challenges Brahmin dominance of religious life. He appeals to the lower castes but in the end, Hindu orthodoxy engages with and brings the social forces he represents within its orbit. Tukaram's life spans the rise to dominance of the Marathas in central India - who eventually dominate the entire subcontinent until about the 1750s. Tukaram lives at a time of economic growth and social transformation that empowers groups outside the traditional power structure but Hindu orthodoxy absorbs the new actors - as it has done many times before.

We are then shown the life of the rebel from Telengana, Papadu (d. 1710) who emerges from the margins of society to become a successful peasant bandit. So successful that the Mughal Emperor comes close to recognisng him as a delegate of imperial authority and incorporating him into the Imperial power structure. However, outraged local elites muster their forces and bring an end to Papadu and his rebellion. We see through Papadu's life the vibrant commerce of Early Modern India especially in the manufacture and sale of textiles which he is able to prey upon and nearly accumulate enough wealth and power to set himself up as a local raja of sorts.

Tarabai ((1675-1761) is Queen of the Marathas and lives at a time when Maratha power peaks. Even the Mughal Emperor is eventually controlled by the Marathas but they themselves are not unified. Tarabai finds herself on the wrong side of two rival Maratha factions and spends the rest of her life in prison - from where she keenly observes events. Towards the end of her life, she notes that the "hatted ones" (ie Europeans) are different from other merchants in that while other merchants are left to their own devices, the power of kings backs the European merchants. With this observation, that narrative ends and the era of the "hatted ones" begins.

Eaton's short book is an engaging survey of a neglected area of Medieval and Early Modern Indian history viewed through the lives of the eight subjects he chooses. The biographies in Eaton's study are canvases onto which he maps the developments that unfold during the period. They include the decline of Medieval Hindu kingdoms and the inability in the end of their elephant corps and massed infantry to deal with fast central Asian horsemen with powerful bows., a problem that Chinese, Persians, Arabs, Russians and Romans all faced at different times. We see the weaving of India into the Persianised political world in the life of Gawan, as well as the vibrant trade that underpinned that world. We also the indigenization of Muslims and turning them into "Indians" in lives of Gawan, Daraz and Ambar. Importantly, we see the mixing of Hindu and Muslim idioms and life in the Deccani Sultantes and Vijanynagar at a time when "Hindu" and "Muslim" were less clear cut and sharply differentiated political categories than what they became in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

A feature of early modern Eurasia is the increasing ability of groups traditionally outside the power structures to challenge old aristocratic and clerical elites, such as the victory of the "common" classes in England and France against the King in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries respectively. In India, we see through Eaton's biographical sketches the rise of vernacular religious and linguistic traditions. Warfare previously dominated by martial elites now sees the entry into the fray of large numbers of peasants in Maharashtra defending their homeland, arguably anticipating the nineteenth century notion of the "nation at arms" . We see this through the life of the Maratha Queen Tarabai. We finally get a glimpse of the peculiar mercantilist modus operandi of Europeans again through Tarabai - that takes us into the next chapter of India's long history.

The form chosen by Eaton is not the easiest way to tackle the writing of history. The key historical processes and trends can only be touched upon and perhaps some knowledge of the subject is required to get the most out of the book. However, the concept works well and allows for a vivid depiction of the period under the study - and perhaps represents part of a general trend of the return of biography as a genre for serious history writing after a long period of disfavor among historians.