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The Cambridge French-English Thesaurus download ebook

by Marie-Noëlle Lamy

The Cambridge French-English Thesaurus download ebook
ISBN:
0521425816
ISBN13:
978-0521425810
Author:
Marie-Noëlle Lamy
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press (January 13, 1998)
Language:
Pages:
340 pages
ePUB:
1549 kb
Fb2:
1755 kb
Other formats:
azw mbr lrf doc
Category:
Humanities
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.7

Marie-Noëlle Lamy, English Français. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 10 October 2008.

Marie-Noëlle Lamy, English Français. Export citation Request permission.

This book is useful for students at all levels. Master the material in this book, and you will be speaking pretty good French. It is up-to-date and very well organized.

ISBN-13: 978-0521425810. The book concludes with a section called Conversational Gambits which provides common expressions needed to introduce people, ask for things, conduct routine business, and write both personal and business letters. A verb conjugation chart and alphabetical English and French word indexes complete the volume.

The Cambridge French-English thesaurus. The Cambridge French-English thesaurus. by. Marie-Noëlle Lamy. Cambridge University Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

The Cambridge French-English Thesaurus book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

The Cambridge French-English Thesaurus book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Cambridge French-English Thesaurus as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This highly useful bilingual thesaurus is aimed at all English-speaking learners and users of French at intermediate and more advanced levels. Structured in a uniquely helpful way, it is arranged thematically, with extensive subdivisions into topic categories. Two alphabetical indexes of more than 8,000 words each, one listing English vocabulary and the other French, help readers find what they're looking for easily.

effeuiller la marguerite - Cambridge French-English Thesaurus by Marie-Noëlle Lamy, Richard Towell, 1998. effeuiller la marguerite - Webster's New World Concise French Dictionary.

by Marie Noelle Lamy. This highly useful bilingual thesaurus is aimed at all English-speaking learners and users of French at intermediate and more advanced levels

by Marie Noelle Lamy. This highly useful bilingual thesaurus is aimed at all English-speaking learners and users of French at intermediate and more advanced levels.

Marie-Noelle also authored the Cambridge French-English Thesaurus and was a co-author of the original . by Marie-Noelle Lamy.

by Marie-Noelle Lamy.

Marie-Noklle Lamy, Richard Towell. This is the first ever bilingual thesaurus of its kind. The book is aimed at all English-speaking learners and users of French at an intermediate to advanced level, and is structured in a uniquely helpful way. The book is arranged thematically rather than alphabetically, with fifteen part titles subdivided into a total of 142 subheadings which are further subdivided into topic categories

This highly useful bilingual thesaurus is aimed at all English-speaking learners and users of French at intermediate and more advanced levels. Structured in a uniquely helpful way, it is arranged thematically, with extensive subdivisions into topic categories. Two alphabetical indexes of more than 8,000 words each, one listing English vocabulary and the other French, help readers find what they're looking for easily. This is the best bilingual thesaurus available Like the best thesauri, it gives not only analogous words but analogous phrases and expressions as well; moreover it explains in what contexts the different synonyms should be used. Contains a wealth of information Let's say you want to look up the French for the word "difficult." You may know that this translates into French as "difficile" but may be curious about other, synonymous words that could be used to mean "difficult" in slightly different contexts. Look up "difficult" in the English-French index at the back of the book, and you're directed to a section that gives you a range of synonymous words and tells you when to use them. Explains nuances and contexts In this way it's like a very elaborate dictionary, with phrases as well as words. Easy to use in French and English There's not only a long English-French index, but a long French-English one as well, so you can come at it from either language, to find your lists of synonyms in either English or French. Moreover, it gives American English expressions as well as British English ones, wherever they differ.
Reviews:
  • Conjulhala
You are a committed student of French and already have a bilingual dictionary and a French-French equivalent. What can and should be added next to your arsenal of reference books? A most outstanding choice is "The Cambridge French-English Thesaurus." This hardback volume is easy to use and a handy guide to all manner of things other than just synonyms. Many of the bonuses come at the end of the book, where there are tutorials on polite language, letter-writing, and verb conjugations. Of course, the main part of the volume (the first 207 pages) is devoted to providing words that relate to a given subject, and it is this part of the thesaurus that i find so compelling for pleasurable grazing, so to speak.

Take, for example, words related to weather, which figure prominently in the writing of several favorite authors of mine. These are broken down into the subsets of weather and climate, weather conditions, rain, wind, fog and clouds, unusual phenomena, cold, and heat. In most instances there are literal English one-word equivalents, but as appropriate the Cambridge thesaurus presents full sentences and indications of which choices equal informal speech. Idiomatic uses are also presented at the end of subsections and are labeled as "locutions", i.e., "idioms." Thus, we have the following: "un coup de tonnerre dans un ciel serein," the French version of a 'bolt out of the blue." Even more figurative is "qu'il pleuve ou qu'il vente," which equates to "come hell or high water."
  • Unh
A thesaurus for English-speaking learners of French, organizing words by subject rather than by alphabet, is a great idea.
This one is pretty good, but weak in several areas (see below). I don't know of anything better, but it's only really useful in conjunction with both a good bilingual dictionary -- I highly recommend the Collins-Robert -- and a French dictionary of synonyms -- I've found Henri Benac, Dictionnaire des Synonymes, helpful.
-- It's not at all clear how its French vocabulary is chosen. Common words like "collegue", "essuie-tout", and "pote" are missing, while uncommon words like "branchage", "velleitaire", and "buraliste" are included. Also, common usages of words, e.g. "(c'est) exact" to mean "just so" are missing.
-- There are occasional articles contrasting near-synonyms, but in a work like this, there should be many more. This is where Benac is very useful.
-- The indexes are incomplete. For instance, "towel" only shows up under "bath towel".
-- Although it tries to show both American and British usage, it is clearly British-based, and is often missing the American term, or gives an unidiomatic one.
  • Dozilkree
An excellent resource for building vocabulary and an aid to speaking more naturally.
  • DABY
Most language-learning books are of those "Learn to Speak Linear-B Like a Native in 7 Days" type. Bad! Really bad! Only the First Ammendment allows them to exist.
Having already a good grip on Spanish and a better grip on Brazilian Portuguese, I decided to attempt the French language. After buying many books and finding most of them disappointing at best, this one is a real treasure.
This book is useful for students at all levels. Master the material in this book, and you will be speaking pretty good French. My tutor agrees. It is up-to-date and very well organized. At $..., it is a steal.
A classroom is a terrible place to learn any language. I know people with degrees in Spanish, French, and Portuguese who cannot hold a conversation in their second language. What went wrong?
Here's my advice, if you will indulge me. If you really want to get started French, get yourself
1) The Barron's series of cassettes/discs and listen to them over and over. Talk back to them.
2) A few pocket dictionaries, placed strategically around your environment so that you will find yourself leafing through them. Same with a few pocket grammars.
3) Get the Dilbert translations from www.amazon.fr.
They are great fun, use a lot of slang, and have plenty of informal usages that you hear every day. Tin-Tin is fun too. Don't waste your time on literature! As a beginner, you need to hear/read CONTEMPORARY DIALOGUE. Comics are great for that.
4) Tune in to Radio France International ( RFI )...
5) Get the Cambridge Fr-Eng Thesaurus and carry it everywhere you go.
6) Get a private tutor - for conversation. You need to speak the language in order to learn it, and your first simian grunts will be so grating that you will need to pay someone to listen to them and correct them. Not cheap, but cheaper than spending year after year getting nowhere in a classroom. Pity my tutor, but that's what she's paid for. We are making fast progress.
7) Worry about perfecting your grammar later. Speak, speak, speak. Learn to communicate before you learn to perfect your communication. Go for quantity, not quality, at first. Travel.
8) Buy a spare copy of the Cambridge French-English Thesaurus in case you lose the first.
Good luck.
  • Grokinos
This book is enormously useful. As a student of French, this book comes in handy when doing French homework, especially French crossword puzzles. If you have done at least a couple of years French study, this is an added bonus.
  • Mpapa
I am finding the Thesaurus an invaluable help in translations of all kinds - I wish I had ordered it long ago!