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Gay Theology Without Apology download ebook

by Gary David Comstock

Gay Theology Without Apology download ebook
ISBN:
0829809449
ISBN13:
978-0829809442
Author:
Gary David Comstock
Publisher:
The Pilgrim Press (April 1, 1993)
Language:
Pages:
192 pages
ePUB:
1187 kb
Fb2:
1533 kb
Other formats:
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Category:
Humanities
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.5

Gay Theology Without Apology book.

Gay Theology Without Apology book. Candidly self-revelatory, he shows how only in taking our own lives seriously can we be lovers of the world.

Gary David Comstock is the university Protestant chaplain and visiting assistant professor of religion at Wesleyan University; he is an ordained minister in the United Church of Christ.

Gay Theology Without Apology. 6 people like this topic. Want to like this page?

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Gary David Comstock books online. Gay Theology Without Apology. Professor Gary David Comstock.

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Gary David Comstock is an American university Protestant chaplain and a visiting assistant professor of religion at Wesleyan University, as well as a writer. Nowadays, Comstock is an ordained minister in the United Church of Christ. Comstock is the author of several books regarding gay and lesbian issues within the church, such as Gay Theology Without Apology and Unrepentant, Self-Affirming, Practicing: People within Organized Religion.

For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit. Published: December 27, 2007

Gay Theology Without Apology. Published: December 27, 2007. It is time to be candid on the whole matter of homosexuality and Christian community. Our church’s history of exclusion with regards to our GLBT Adventists and the pain and suffering that our denomination’s ex-gay ministries has caused so many only further illustrates the need for productive guidance and thoughtful dialogue on the matter. Seeing the torment in the lives of so many GLBT Adventists and counting the deaths of those who opted to not only leave the church but end their lives because of the inaction of the church.

Comstock is a UCC minister and chaplain at Weslyan University. Looks at scripture, moral theology, and pastoral ministry to lesbian and gay people

Comstock is a UCC minister and chaplain at Weslyan University. These essays are thoroughly pro-gay and he is willing to attack Biblical homophobia. Looks at scripture, moral theology, and pastoral ministry to lesbian and gay people.

In "Gay Theology Without Apology," Gary David Comstock has made an outstanding contribution to the growing body of "gay-friendly" Christian literature

In "Gay Theology Without Apology," Gary David Comstock has made an outstanding contribution to the growing body of "gay-friendly" Christian literature. An ordained minister of the United Church of Christ and a university professor, Comstock brings both sensitivity and intelligence to his subject. Ultimately, his is a forward-thinking and inclusive Christian theology which affirms that gay love and sexuality are not only compatible with the Christian walk, but that the Christian community as a whole is impoverished by the exclusion of self-affirming lesbians and gay men.

"In these fresh and bold essays, Gary David Comstock finds God's liberating connection in scripture-from-the-underside, in nontraditional traditions, and in body experience. Candidly self-revelatory, he shows how only in taking our own lives seriously can we be lovers of the world. Gay Theology without Apology is ... a charter of hope for gay/lesbian/bisexual Christians on the edges of the church." James B. Nelson
Reviews:
  • Yozshujinn
A great, well-rounded source material on queer theology. If you read the Bible to endorse homophobia, you should read this. But you probably won't.
  • Maucage
Gary David Comstock is the university Protestant chaplain and visiting assistant professor of religion at Wesleyan University; he is an ordained minister in the United Church of Christ. He has written/edited other books such as Unrepentant, Self-Affirming, Practicing: Lesbian/Bisexual/Gay People Within Organized Religion,Violence Against Lesbians and Gay Men,A Whosoever Church: Welcoming Lesbians and Gay Men into African American Congregations,Que(e)rying Religion: A Critical Anthology, etc.

He wrote in the Introduction to this 1993 book, “The following chapters put for ‘A’ particular gay theology---an understanding of my ultimate concern---and make no claim to be the definitive gay theology. My intention is… to add my voice to others’ and to encourage others to speak… I wrote these chapters within a five-year period at the end of the 1980s and the beginning of the 1990s, a personally secure and professionally productive time for me… The formation of relationships and the building of community that both result in and provide for acceptance, support, and productivity are the central themes developed and discussed in the following chapters.” (Pg. 5-6)

He explains, “The kind of relationship with the Bible that I am suggesting cannot be made without discussion, conflict, and examination with others in community; without its own consequences of challenging, offending, and feeling at odds with others; without effort, strength, and resources that are years in the making. The relationship is not progressive and linear, but rather a recurring and often slowly building process, continually resurrected by the need for suffering and pain to be changed.” (Pg. 14)

Later, he adds, “The Bible is, after all, a patriarchal document. The social structure of biblical times was patriarchal… That the theological document to emerge from these times would be an expression by those men about their God is illustrated in the so-called ‘household codes’ of the New Testament…” (Pg. 34-35) He continues, “Within such a patriarchal framework, therefore, lesbians and gay men should not be surprised to find passages that malign us. Our tendency, however, has been to apologize for those biblical passages that appear to condemn homosexuality and attack lesbians and gay men.” (Pg. 38)

He observes, “Jesus’ ministry, to be sure, was remarkable; but it was not complete. Jesus is, for example, observed to have broken traditional barriers in his relationships with and regard for women; and yet his organization of twelve disciples was all male … and has provided a model for patriarchy that holds for structuring church leadership to this day. We have the task of expanding and altering that ministry and of not accepting it as a finished product.” (Pg. 47)

He suggests, “It is less important to me that David and Jonathan might have had a homosexual relationship than that a writer or writers may have used an available framework to tell a story that would be read or heard differently by gay men than by nongay people. Gay men today, then, may embrace Jonathan as a fellow lover because of those who wrote, compiled, and edited his story. We identify with Jonathan because of what the writers of his story were able to tell us. We find strength for ourselves because the story is about and by others who have lived through and who endeavored to express themselves as we do. We grasp support for our own struggle from the survival of Jonathan’s story and how it came to be told.” (Pg. 89)

He acknowledges, “My own current participation in the church is predicated on having left it, on finding welcome and nurture in the nonchurched lesbian/gay community, and then on returning, strengthened and confident as a gay man, to try to make a place for myself and other lesbian/gay/bisexual people within it. My reliable source of support for doing this remains lesbians and gay men outside of the church, and I often find myself retreating to them to rest and renew my strength for the battles and homophobia that rage and fester within the church. I wish the church were the place where I could rest, be whole, and work, but it is not.” (Pg. 101)

He notes, “I believe that we are created and destroyed in our relationships. God is the mutuality and reciprocity in our relationships, the compelling and transforming power that brings together, reconciles, and creates us. The creative power of mutuality and the destruction wrought by its absence are perhaps most readily and urgently represented by the ‘non-negotiable demands’ that we humans are getting…” (Pg. 127) Later, he adds, “If God is understood as the mutuality and reciprocity in our relationships and Jesus is our saving one another from loneliness, despair, abuse, and neglect, the Holy Spirit is the community that includes and encourages each person to share her or his gifts. The ‘holy’ or ‘whole’ spirit---the creative and saving power of God set among us---is inclusive community.” (Pg. 138)

This book will be of great interest to those interested in the theological implications of LGBTQ culture and ideas.
  • Kajishakar
Comstock clearly announces his bias in the title, 'Gay Theology without Apology'. Comstock has absolutely no doubt about the destructive nature of homophobia, the catch-all phrase in current parlance to mean those who are opposed for whatever reason to homosexuality (I would like to see a different word developed -- the 'phobia' part implies more than it should be implying in many cases of my experience, and leaves little room for a reasonable difference of opinion).
Comstock's emphasis is on the well-being of the community and a reinterpretation of those parts of the community which do harm. Comstock's definition of sin 'is the violation of mutuality and reciprocity, typically in the form of dominance and submission' -- i.e., he sees the power-disparity between a man and woman as far more potentially sinful than a same-sex relationship would have. Comstock freely reinterprets scripture, saying 'the Bible is not a coherent rule book with a consistent, reliable and currently applicable list of sins' -- something I agree with, or else, we're all doomed because we none of us try to hold to all of them equally -- 'but it does provide some guidelines for naming and changing what is wrong.' This is the crucial point upon which the entire theological framework of Comstock's book turns -- how do we determine the boundaries of interpreting scripture to suit the present day situation?
And yes, I do mean interpret, after all, even those who are Biblical literalists sometimes fail to realise that 'to take the text literally' is an interpretation -- I do not discount literalism as something to take into account.
Comstock ultimately sees the exclusion of the homosexual from community as a great sin, while asking those who consider homosexuality a sin to pinpoint the locus of the harm being done.
I find some of Comstock's methodology compelling, and some unsettling. Comstock says at the outset that 'Christian Scripture and tradition are not authorities from which I seek approval; rather they are resources from which I draw guidance and learn lessons' -- from which I take him to mean that he would not be wearing a WWJD arm bracelet. However, Comstock is forward in saying that this particular work represents 'A' gay theology, and not 'THE' definitive gay theology.
Far from definitive, but a series of issues that must be dealt with in the current climate of many denominations -- this book helps to clarify many topics.
  • Qucid
Gary Comstock was the first openly gay man to be appointed as a chaplain at a major US university (Wesleyan Univ., in Connecticut). Although Comstock's background is in academia rather than churchwork, this book is hardly "academic" in the derogative sense. It is deeply personal and moving, yet managaing to be relevant to the average reader. For anyone who has questioned their faith because of the prejudice and intolerance in Christianity, I would recommend this book. It makes no apology for the intolerance of the Bible, but somehow managed to be all the more spiritually comforting. Anyone, queer or straight, will find guidance here.