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Alchemist download ebook

by Ben Jonson

Alchemist download ebook
ISBN:
0393900142
ISBN13:
978-0393900149
Author:
Ben Jonson
Publisher:
W W Norton & Co Inc (June 1976)
ePUB:
1668 kb
Fb2:
1914 kb
Other formats:
txt lrf azw doc
Category:
Humanities
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.5

The Alchemist is a comedy by English playwright Ben Jonson.

The Alchemist is a comedy by English playwright Ben Jonson. First performed in 1610 by the King's Men, it is generally considered Jonson's best and most characteristic comedy; Samuel Taylor Coleridge considered it had one of the three most perfect plots in literature.

The Project Gutenberg Etext of The Alchemist, by Ben Jonson. This file should be named lchms10. The Alchemist 1 The Alchemist. 274 Pages·2007·541 KB·5,369 Downloads. The Project Gutenberg Literary Archive Foundation has been created to secure a future for Project The Alchemist. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho. The Selected Plays of Ben Jonson: Volume 2: The Alchemist, Bartholomew Fair, The New Inn, A Tale of a Tub (Plays by Renaissance and Restoration Dramatists). 89 MB·35 Downloads·New!

Продолжительность: 2:27:53 HALIDONMUSIC Recommended for you. 2:27:53. Learn English Through Story, Subtitles: The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho ( Level 7 ) - Продолжительность: 2:54:30 Eden Buttenshaw Recommended for you. 2:54:30

I enjoy reading Shakespeare, and reading Ben Johnson's "The alchemist" was a similar g, funny, and a quick trip back in time that reaffirms that some things about people never change.

I enjoy reading Shakespeare, and reading Ben Johnson's "The alchemist" was a similar g, funny, and a quick trip back in time that reaffirms that some things about people never change. I recently read the early 17th century comedy "Volpone", my first introduction to Ben Jonson. I was surprised by how well Jonson's humor had traveled through 400 years of cultural change. I did have difficulty with Jonson's dedication (several pages), the introductory argument, and the prologue as well as a "Pythagorean literary satire" in Act One, Scene One. But thereafter I found the humor to be natural and enjoyable.

Ben Jonson came of the stock that was centuries after to give to the world Thomas Carlyle; for Jonson's grandfather was of Annandale, over the Solway, whence he migrated to England. Jonson's father lost his estate under Queen Mary, "having been cast into prison and forfeited. He entered the church, but died a month before his illustrious son was born, leaving his widow and child in poverty.

An outbreak of plague in London forces a gentleman, Lovewit, to flee temporarily to the country, leaving his house under the sole charge of his butler, Jeremy. Jeremy uses the opportunity given to him to use the house as the headquarters for fraudulent acts. He transforms himself into 'Captain Face', and enlists the aid of Subtle, a fellow conman and Dol Common, a prostitute. In The Alchemist, Jonson unashamedly satirizes the follies, vanities and vices of mankind, most notably greed-induced credulity

Seriously, if you want to read a Ben Johnson play, read Volpone, it is way better and still holds u. .

I've now read his play The Alchemist, and the man can write. But I take issue when people say things "yeah, but he's no Shakespeare. Because what does that mean? The comedic timing, pacing, rising stakes, and witty dialogue are all top notch. Seriously, if you want to read a Ben Johnson play, read Volpone, it is way better and still holds u.

The Alchemist (Johnson): Novel Summary. Ben Jonson was born around June 11, 1572, in London, to an Anglican clergyman. He was educated by the great classical scholar, William Camden, at Westminster School

The Alchemist (Johnson): Novel Summary. He was educated by the great classical scholar, William Camden, at Westminster School. When his mother remarried a bricklayer after his father died, Jonson was apprenticed as a bricklayer in his stepfather’s business.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. The Alchemist" is a comedy by English playwright Ben Jonson

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. The Alchemist" is a comedy by English playwright Ben Jonson. The play's clever fulfilment of the classical unities and vivid depiction of human folly have made it one of the few Renaissance plays (except the works of Shakespeare) with a continuing life on stage (except for a period of neglect during the Victorian era).

Reviews:
  • lifestyle
This is a review of the edition, not the play, which is wonderfully funny. The recent (summer 2016) RSC production was terrific! This edition is a school text which does not fully gloss the play but only some of the difficult words. Presumably a teacher in the classroom could discuss words and passages and so forth. But it served my purpose, which was to review the play before seeing the RSC performance I mentioned--it was thin enough to fit into my suitcase. I don't believe a fuller Arden edition is available, and who could carry around a full scholarly edition of Jonson's plays?
  • Adorardana
there is no good annotations
  • Orevise
It's the old version and it was too complicated.
  • Quinthy
This is NOT the famous scifi novel. My new roommate recommended this book so I read it to get to know her better. I kept reading because I was trying to be nice. But after 40 pages I quit and asked her how she could possibly be so boring. Turns out it's the wrong book. Worst 40 pages I've ever read. I know I was expecting a different book but I can't imagine how anyone would enjoy reading this. The book felt like one huge run-on sentence and never seemed to make a point.
  • CONVERSE
I recently read the early 17th century comedy "Volpone", my first introduction to Ben Jonson. I was surprised by how well Jonson's humor had traveled through 400 years of cultural change. I did have difficulty with Jonson's dedication (several pages), the introductory argument, and the prologue as well as a "Pythagorean literary satire" in Act One, Scene One. But thereafter I found the humor to be natural and enjoyable. I even found myself somewhat sympathetic for the unscrupulous Volpone, Mosca, Voltore, Corbaccio, and Corvino. I immediately hunted around on my dustier bookshelves for other works of Ben Jonson.
"Epicene" was less easy to digest, but was worth the effort. There is a surprising twist in the final scene and I suggest that the reader avoid any literary criticism or introductions to "Epicene" until after your first reading. I had less empathy for the characters in "Epicene" and it was difficult to identify any "good guys". The characters were not terribly disagreeable, but simply dilettantes that had little concern for morality or ethics. The dialogue is more obscure (and more bawdy) than in "Volpone". I found it helpful to first read the footnotes for a scene before actually reading the scene itself.
"The Alchemist" is more like "Volpone". The main characters are unscrupulous con-men; their targets are gullible, greedy individuals. I learned quite a bit about alchemy, at least alchemy as practiced by 17th century con-men. As with "Volpone" and "Epicene", I was unable to predict how Ben Jonson would bring the play to a satisfactory conclusion. I enjoyed "The Alchemist" and I expect that I will read it again. I don't know if it is performed very often, but it would probably be quite entertaining.
"Bartholomew Fair" introduces a large, motley collection of characters that largely converse in lower class colloquialisms that require some effort to master. The comedy was intended in part to be a satire on Puritans and thereby please King James, but it was equally an introduction to the varied individuals that might be encountered at an annual fair. It was not easy to keep track of the many characters and I continually referred to the cast listing to reorient myself.
There are a number of collections of Ben Jonson's plays. I recommend an inexpensive collection, "The Alchemist and Other Plays", publish by Oxford University Press as a World's Classic. The introduction, glossary, and explanatory footnotes by Gordon Campbell are quite good. Begin with either "Volpone" or "The Alchemist" if you are new to Jonson. I hope you are as surprised and pleased as I was.
  • Eseve
Ben Jonson is a great writer who's only mistake must be to have been born at the same time as the great Shakespeare. Full of satire and sexual innuendos, The Alchemist narrates the tale of two rogues, one the alchemist who promises people to turn all their items to gold and the other his helper. Matched with a prostitute who fools around with them it makes a comic tale of lust and greed.
  • Tetaian
Ben Jonson, although modern audiences find him difficult to read, played an important role in the development of the English comedic play. Volpone is a dark comedy that explores the twisted world of a con artist and his toady. The play demonstrates Jonson's awareness of the hypocrisy of social situations. Similarly, Bartholomew Fair takes the reader on a tour of the seamier side of seventeenth century London life. Zeal of the Land Busy, a religious hypocrite, still speaks to our generation when questions of religious expression still plague us. Epicene is a gender-bender in which the ideal silent woman turns out to be a man. The Alchemist, although the most difficult of the plays to read, is worth the effort, as it explores the questions of knowledge, ownership of knowledge, and abuse common in today's world.
The Alchemist By Paulo Coelh