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What about Gods? (The Skeptic's Bookshelf) download ebook

by Chris Brockman

What about Gods? (The Skeptic's Bookshelf) download ebook
ISBN:
0879751061
ISBN13:
978-0879751067
Author:
Chris Brockman
Publisher:
Prometheus Books; 2nd ed. edition (May 1, 1978)
Language:
Pages:
27 pages
ePUB:
1414 kb
Fb2:
1751 kb
Other formats:
txt rtf lrf lit
Category:
Humanities
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.1

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What about Gods? book. Start by marking What about Gods? (Skeptic's Bookshelf Series) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. What about Gods? by Chris Brockman.

People who help us understand the world and how it works are important people. They are scientists, teachers, parents, and many others. They should also help us understand what it means to be a human being. Target/Movies, Music & Books/Books/Kids' Books‎. product description page.

Author of Growing Up in Boom Times, I Used To Be Old, What About gods?, and What to Think About: Philosophy for a Thoughtful Younger Generation

Author of Growing Up in Boom Times, I Used To Be Old, What About gods?, and What to Think About: Philosophy for a Thoughtful Younger Generation, I grew up in the Middle Straits neighborhood of Orchard Lake, MI. I am married to Julie Sanderson Brockman, WLHS '66. I teach English at a community college, and I write.

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Skeptic's Bookshelf Series) found in the catalog. Published June 1979 by Prometheus Books. What About Gods? (Skeptic's Bookshelf Series) Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove What About Gods? (Skeptic's Bookshelf Series) from your list? What About Gods? (Skeptic's Bookshelf Series).

What About Gods? by Chris Brockman. In this book Smith dissects atheism and theism with an epistemological scalpel. Smith also takes on the Ontological argument for God (not included in his earlier work). A marvellous, small book on atheism for children and adults alike, wonderfully written. He discusses the distinction between belief and knowledge, what counts as knowledge, Occam's Razor, Rand's view of contextual certainty and modern empiricism.

Kent Brockman is a fictional character in the animated television series The Simpsons. He is voiced by Harry Shearer and first appeared in the episode "Krusty Gets Busted". He is a grumpy, self-centered local Springfield news anchor

Kent Brockman is a fictional character in the animated television series The Simpsons. He is a grumpy, self-centered local Springfield news anchor

People who help us understand the world and how it works are important people. They are scientists, teachers, parents, and many others. They should also help us understand what it means to be a human being. They should help us learn that human beings can best get along with one another by cooperating to make our world a beautiful and friendly place to live.They should help people to want to be good by showing everyone that being good makes the world much nicer for all of us. Then no one would have to scare anybody into being good by inventing gods.Unfortunately, many important people treat other people, especially children, as if they had no minds. They seem to think that other people will always want to do bad things.
Reviews:
  • Obong
I wish there were more books like this. "What About Gods" really walks children through a simplified version of what gods are and why people believe in them. This books needs to be read under adult guidance for children under nine or ten (maybe older), because it is still a complicated subject matter.

"What About Gods" really walks a parent through the difficult task of explaining religion to kids, and gives kids the confidence to know that there is no reason for them to conform to a religious society.
  • Zan
This book provides a child with a look at WHY people believe and HOW critical thinking skills can open one's mind. This book is a little "wordy" for children under 10 but provides a good message anyway. My only complaint is that the pictures are lacking color. My son can always use the artwork as a color sheet though :)
  • Manris
I found the book magnificient in that not only was I able to stand by with my wife as my children read the book out loud witout any help, but I was able to expand on what Dan Barker covered. If you don't plan to live 1 million years, or have a will with specific instructions on what your children should learn, then begin by teaching them how to think on their own by using their logic, understanding and reason, not yours, their neighbors, teachers, friends, televisions, history, unfounded believes, etc. The world will eat them up and swallow them in pieces if we don't teach them how to think and be freethinkers.
  • Daiktilar
We bought this for our kids a few years ago. (They were around Kindergarten age, I believe.) When they were little, we read it to them and they enjoyed both the book (word content/pictures) and the discussions it spawned amongst us. Now that they are older, they can read it on their own and are able to understand more on their own, but it is still a conversation piece.

I love the simple, matter-of-fact text and the fact that it elegantly explains that religions are not true and gods are not real without being insulting or rude, either to the reader or to the people who believe those things. The pictures are lovely and detailed without distracting from the text. Would definitely recommend to like-minded people.

And, for the people who one-starred it: I have no idea how they did not realize this is an atheistic book unless they didn't read anything about it.
  • Dream
I found this book to be direct and easy to understand. It covered the basics leaving plenty of room for discussion. I don't mind its tone at all. It's honest and that's hard to find. I don't see the point in walking on eggshells and treating deities any more valid than a fire breathing unicorn that lays golden eggs. I guess you could say it's bold but it's not offensive.
  • Zbr
As an atheist, I completely agree with everything in this book. However, I'm uncomfortable with the harsh way these ideas are presented for children (as if those who hold a belief are bad and that the non-believers are the only clear thinkers). I felt as if I was being sternly lectured on the subject, even though I already agree. I have a 5 year old who has a lot of questions about religion and God and I'm trying not to push my view on her even though we do talk about why I don't believe in God. Anyway, I thought this might be something we could read together and then talk about the different beliefs and reasons people believe, etc. but I think this book is a little too heavy handed, so I'll be shelving it for a while. Bummer.
  • Ximinon
My 9 year old was disappointed in this book. He already expressed agnostic leanings, and I thought this book would help clarify the issues. The thesis of this book is that the Judeo-Christian God is part of a mythological tradition and people believe in God for nonrational reasons. My son was disappointed that the book did not effectively explain why really smart people believe in God. The problem with the book is that it does not present alternate conceptions of God (besides the old man in the sky conception), so the book is an example of the straw man fallacy. Another problem with the book is that it assumes a very simplistic view of belief and knowledge. The book raises the right issues, but it is too superficial even for children. I would recommend it only if presented with another book that scratches the surface more deeply.
I chose not to let my children read this. The book is very down on any kind of belief in the supernatural (soul, spirit, etc) and seems to encourage belittling those that believe in anything unseen.
I had hoped this was a book describing peoples' various views on god(s) and perhaps a brief overview of the development of religious belief. I was disappointed.