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The Sixties Unplugged: A Kaleidoscopic History of a Disorderly Decade download ebook

by Gerard J. DeGroot

The Sixties Unplugged: A Kaleidoscopic History of a Disorderly Decade download ebook
ISBN:
0674034635
ISBN13:
978-0674034631
Author:
Gerard J. DeGroot
Publisher:
Harvard University Press; 1 edition (March 30, 2010)
Language:
Pages:
528 pages
ePUB:
1646 kb
Fb2:
1396 kb
Other formats:
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Category:
Humanities
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

The Sixties Unplugged shows how opportunity was squandered, and why nostalgia for the decade has obscured . This book revisits the Sixties we forgot or somehow failed to witness

The Sixties Unplugged shows how opportunity was squandered, and why nostalgia for the decade has obscured sordidness and futility. This book revisits the Sixties we forgot or somehow failed to witness. In a kaleidoscopic global tour of the decade, Gerard DeGroot reminds us that the âeoeBallad of the Green Beretâe outsold âeoeGive Peace a Chance,âe that the Students for a Democratic Society were outnumbered by Young Americans for Freedom, that revolution was always a pipe dream, and that the Sixties belong to Reagan and de Gaulle more than to Kennedy and Dubcek.

This is a really important book to put perspective on such a formative .

This is a really important book to put perspective on such a formative decade and remove some of the romance. It is an ambitious project to attempt to cover the whole of a decade in one book and it felt like rather a big task to just read it. DeGroot's central premise is that the 1960s weren't the idealistic. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus. A squarish yet thorough survey of the time of torment. Born in 1955, DeGroot (Modern History/Univ. of St. Andrews; Dark Side of the Moon: The Magnificent Madness of the American Lunar Quest, 2006, etc.

In a kaleidoscopic global tour of the decade, Gerard DeGroot reminds us that the . The Sixties Unplugged shows how opportunity was squandered, and why nostalgia for the decade has obscured sordidness and futility.

In a kaleidoscopic global tour of the decade, Gerard DeGroot reminds us that the âeoeBallad of the Green Beretâe outsold âeoeGive Peace a Chance,âe that the Students for a Democratic Society were outnumbered by Young Americans for Freedom, that revolution was always a pipe dream, and that the Sixties belong to Reagan and de Gaulle more than to Kennedy and Dubcek.

by Gerard J. De Groot Written in English. Nineteen sixties, In library. There's no description for this book yet. De Groot. Published 2008 by Harvard University Press in Cambridge, Mass. Includes bibliographical references and index.

Psicología de los peruanos en el tiempo y la historia.

High New York: The Birth of a Psychedelic Subculture in the American City. The Allen Institute for AIProudly built by AI2 with the help of our.

Recollections of the Sixties have often been used by left and right alike; many liberals have attempted to remember the decade as an era of unprecedented optimism and praised its numerous achievements.

The Sixties Unplugged book. In a kaleidoscopic global tour of the decade, Gerard DeGroot reminds us that the "If you remember the Sixties," quipped Robin Williams, "you weren't there. That was, of course, an oblique reference to the mind-bending drugs that clouded perception-yet time has proven an equally effective hallucinogen.

Gerard DeGroot is a Professor of Modern History at the University of St Andrew's, where he has taught since 1985. An American by birth, he came to Britain in 1980 to do a P. at Edinburgh University. He is the author of ten highly acclaimed books on twentieth-century history and has published widely in academic journals and in the popular press. Country of Publication.

Gerard J De Groot, Gerard J DeGroot, Gerard J deGroot. If you remember the Sixties," quipped Robin Williams, "you weren't there. This book revisits the Sixties we forgot or somehow failed to witness

“If you remember the Sixties,” quipped Robin Williams, “you weren’t there.” That was, of course, an oblique reference to the mind-bending drugs that clouded perception―yet time has proven an equally effective hallucinogen. This book revisits the Sixties we forgot or somehow failed to witness. In a kaleidoscopic global tour of the decade, Gerard DeGroot reminds us that the “Ballad of the Green Beret” outsold “Give Peace a Chance,” that the Students for a Democratic Society were outnumbered by Young Americans for Freedom, that revolution was always a pipe dream, and that the Sixties belong to Reagan and de Gaulle more than to Kennedy and Dubcek.

The Sixties Unplugged shows how opportunity was squandered, and why nostalgia for the decade has obscured sordidness and futility. DeGroot returns us to a time in which idealism, tolerance, and creativity gave way to cynicism, chauvinism, and materialism. He presents the Sixties as a drama acted out on stages around the world, a theater of the absurd in which China’s Cultural Revolution proved to be the worst atrocity of the twentieth century, the Six-Day War a disaster for every nation in the Middle East, and a million slaughtered Indonesians martyrs to greed.

The Sixties Unplugged restores to an era the prevalent disorder and inconvenient truths that longing, wistfulness, and distance have obscured. In an impressionistic journey through a tumultuous decade, DeGroot offers an object lesson in the distortions nostalgia can create as it strives to impose order on memory and value on mayhem.

Reviews:
  • Llathidan
I came of age during that period of time, but did not have the depth or developed character to understand the bombardment of world chaos occurring around me. This book effectively presents in admirable detail the behind the scenes' threats, negotiations, cruelty, and utter failure of supposed leaders from around the world and internally from those who questioned the status quo, and makes clear the question "How did we manage to survive that decade?". And from remembering these significant events, now in hindsight, and comparing them to the struggles that we deal with today comes the second question "Do people ever really change?" But I think the author successfully shows that the wheels of change grind very very slowly, regardless of intellectual awareness of the problems, and that the deep ugliness of the 1960's presented a formidable tableau where change could gain a foothold and get a leg up, certainly at a far faster rate then ever seen before, and that it did occur. This book is excellent for presenting the broad picture.
  • Riavay
A previous reviewer said this book is strictly negative, and that's partly true.
The reason it has such a negative feel is because it attacks many sacred cows that we've come to associate with '60s history: Camelot, Woodstock, Haight-Ashbury, the moon landing, et al.
Nothing is "all good" or "all bad," and if there's any decade in the 20th century that seems to organize itself in that way, in retrospect, it's the '60s.
I would recommend this book most for people who have followed analysis of '60s history for a while and seek a few grains of salt. But I could also recommend it as a Sixties 101 along with "Boom" by Tom Brokaw -- both as generalized starting points.
  • Hra
Disgusting!
  • Cia
Very insightful book that reads well and flows brilliantly.
  • OwerSpeed
A well-crafted compendium of the notable events and people of the Sixties. Arranged as self-contained vignettes, it reads like a short story anthology. Writing is crisp and insightful, with an abundance of tongue-in-cheek humor. Sets out to debunk many of the popular but mythical historical viewpoints of the decade and add clarity and analysis to much that seems inexplicable, and achieves these aims. Also discusses many international events and people to avoid making this a U.S.-only story. Includes appropriate background from earlier decades as well as projection into future years, for historical context. This is history at its best.
  • Moogura
I bought two copies of this book for friends of mine who are totally into the 60's. This book is ANTI-60's... not for the run of the mill flower-child... The first page i flipped to, said how there were no significant musical advansments in the 60's... HELLO???????? hendrix, janis, morrison????
  • Xlisiahal
There are certain periods of history that don't receive the attention they deserve, and others that are examined more than is necessary. The 1960's is one of the former, for although it was indeed a turbulent time, particularly in the United States, it consisted of such a jumble of historic events (Vietnam, the hippies, the Cold War, Civil Rights, et al) that it is difficult to find a central theme or point of view or focus. As a result histories of this era are few and far between.

The other difficulty with histories of recent times is that they are a part of the living memory of the author. Since the 1960's was the decade in which the contemporary political scism between right and left first burst into full form, many of the books about it tend, consciously or unconsciously, to be slanted or edited in order to support the point of view of the author, socially or politically, rendering them little more than political diatribes in support of the author's beliefs.

"The Sixties Unplugged" manages to capture a sense and feel of the decade while generally presenting a balanced recounting of the various events and aspects of life in America as it actually was. Written in the form of short examinations of individual happenings or cultural conditions as they came into being or underwent significant development, it covers a wide range of the events from society, culture, the economy, politics, the arts and geo-political relations. While occasionally judgemental about certain events and issues, it nevertheless takes pains to present a balanced view of each topic and frequently provides information usually not considered or outlined which can have an impact on the conclusions one draws about that event.

This volume, coupled with the David Halberstam history "The Fifties", cover those two under examined decades to provide a good general overview of what life was really like, what it felt like to exist in that time and provide a general overall image of the times. While it won't allow anyone to consider themselves fully versent regarding the period, it at least can help tie together many of the bits and pieces of where the world in which we live today first developed. For that alone it is well worth reading.