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Trans-Sister Radio: A Novel download ebook

by Chris Bohjalian

Trans-Sister Radio: A Novel download ebook
ISBN:
079272366X
ISBN13:
978-0792723660
Author:
Chris Bohjalian
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ePUB:
1590 kb
Fb2:
1598 kb
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Rating:
4.2

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. From the bestselling author of Midwives comes a thought-provoking story about gender, love.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

"If the body and soul are comely, who am I to quarrel about the color of wings or the speed of flight?" Thomas burnett swann. Should one deal with our sister as with a harlot?"

"If the body and soul are comely, who am I to quarrel about the color of wings or the speed of flight?" Thomas burnett swann. Should one deal with our sister as with a harlot?" Genesis 34:31. part I. National public radio transcript: All Things Considered. Monday, September 24. LINDA WERTHEIMER: Periodically this year we have explored what we've called the Nature of Love: those strange and wondrous ways we find our soul sparked by somebody else.

WithTrans-Sister Radio, Chris Bohjalian, author of the bestsellerMidwives, again confronts his very human characters with issues larger than themselves, here tackling the explosive issue of gender

WithTrans-Sister Radio, Chris Bohjalian, author of the bestsellerMidwives, again confronts his very human characters with issues larger than themselves, here tackling the explosive issue of gender. When Allison Banks develops a crush on Dana Stevens, she knows that he will give her what she needs most: attention, gentleness, kindness, passion. Her daughter, Carly, enthusiastically witnesses the change in her mother. WithTrans-Sister Radio, Chris Bohjalian, author of the bestsellerMidwives, again confronts his very human characters with issues larger than themselves, here tackling the explosive issue of gender

Trans-Sister Radi. ears Bohjalian’s hallmark: ordinary people in heartbreaking circumstances behaving with . Like that novel, Trans-Sister Radio challenges readers’ most dearly held notions of biological reality.

Trans-Sister Radi. ears Bohjalian’s hallmark: ordinary people in heartbreaking circumstances behaving with grace and dignit. .Speaks directly to the heart. San Francisco Chronicle. highly original nove.Impossible to put down. Bohjalian ha. ritten an interesting ultimately, a quite daring novel, and a worthy successor to Midwives. Philadelphia Inquirer. An insightful look at love and sexualit. ith great compassion and insight.

In Trans-Sister Radio, Chris Bohjalian (feted by Oprah for his novel Midwives) explores love, gender, and vaginas. For reasons I cannot fathom, Bohjalian has decided to structure his novel as if it were an episode of the National Public Radio staple "All Things Considered. The first page reads like a script, and chapters are then given to the vivid and well-imagined people who are "interviewed": Carly Banks, a college freshman, her father Will, her mother Allison Banks, and the man Allison falls in love with, Dana Stevens

Trans-sister radio : a novel. by. Bohjalian, Christopher A. Publication date. New York : Harmony Books.

Trans-sister radio : a novel. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; ctlibrary; americana.

Trans-Sister Radio book. Her daughter, Carly, With Trans-Sister Radio, Chris Bohjalian, author of the bestseller Midwives, again confronts his very human characters with issues larger than themselves, here tackling the explosive issue of gender.

What if the person you have fallen madly, firmly in love with were to tell you that they are someone else-someone you are suddenly unsure you know? New York Times best-selling author Chris Bohjalian, known and loved for his inventive tales of people caught in moral and ethical dilemmas, posits this very question in a romantic and edgy new novel that's impossible to put down. Alison Banks is an elementary school teacher in her early 40s, whose only daughter is leaving soon for college. A though-provoking tale with a rich, varied textur.

From the bestselling author of Midwives comes a thought-provoking story about gender, love, and new relationships.

Reviews:
  • Legend 33
As a trans woman myself I tend not to read much in the way of trans fiction - too close to home, been there done that, etc. But my sister was reading this in her book club and wanted to discuss it with me, so...net-net I must say I did enjoy it. The NPR device - having the plot unwind through the format of an evolving NPR story - was done exceptionally well (to the point where on more than one occasion I imagined I was reading an actual NPR transcript). The writing was brisk and enjoyable.

That being said, it is hard for me to give this review more than three stars because some key parts of the plot depend on things I find wildly unrealistic about the M2F transition experience. Dana is trans and apparently already fairly far along in the physical transformation process - she's just a few months away from the reassignment surgery, which means that she should already be living full time as a woman. She's not, though, and she meets Allie while still in the outward presentation of a man. We are then to believe that Allie falls in love with Dana, believing that she is dating a man, has phenomenal sex with said Dana, is thrown for a loop when Dana confesses to being a trans woman, forgives her and STILL has mind-blowing sex literally right up to the moment when Dana goes under the knife and comes out with a vagina.

It's a good story - but it is pure fiction. Dana's hormone regimen should have killed off her ability to perform sexually as a male months before she was supposed to have met Allie, let alone on the same morning as she swaps one set of genitalia for another. But the way this story is told, it was the singular act of sexual reassignment that caused Allie to stop regarding Dana as a high-octane male sex machine and to see her instead as a woman - and therefore not someone with whom she, a heterosexual female, could commit to a life partnership. I realize that I am being somewhat hard on what is in many places an engaging and tender story - but these details do matter when they are so germane to the central plot. And don't get me started on the utterly improbable (and strangely concocted) story of Allie's ex, Will, and Dana with which the book concludes.
  • Silver Globol
I heard about this book on NPR and thought I should read it having met a person going through some of these transgender journeys. She is a business colleague and has a hard time with the transitioning process professionally (she was fired and then subsequently successfully sued for discrimination. They settled, and she started a new career. She is doing well on her journey but has trouble finding relationships and negotiating family life.) We became friends and she has trusted me and shared her challenges and her feelings.

I found this book increased my awareness of her journey, and made me a better understanding friend, and, quite frankly, answered many of the questions that I had about "how all of this works" and allowed us to keep the conversation on other things besides the mechanics of what happened (I could ask appropriate caring questions without prying). Everyone's journey is different, but there are common threads, which is how we can learn compassion and empathy with those that experience the world differently than we do.

I highly recommend this book to anyone curious or to anyone looking to see the world through the eyes of someone going through this journey - or just because it is well done and interesting.
  • Low_Skill_But_Happy_Deagle
I wish there was a lot more work along the lines of this piece. It's heartfelt with a touching degree of sincerity and painful realism. Life isn't easy and the reality of our aspirations and their consequences is often bittersweet at best. TG literature is beset with the excess of fantasy and an almost fervency of happily-ever-after. The alternative is movies like Jessica Lange in Normal. Bohjalian skirts much of the grit by way of masterfully large brush strokes, while preserving the small details that reflect his ability to define his characters without getting lost in them. In a sense, when art imitates life with a certain intensity and reverence we're inspired to grapple with our own narratives and dare ourselves to dream for more.
  • Syleazahad
I am a fan of this author, but this book did not work for me. I had just finished "The Sleepwalker" (incredibly good!), and I was convinced that I'd love anything by Bohjalian. But authors have imaginations that take them into so many different territories, and not all of them work for everybody.

Trans-Sister Radio was a disappointment for me. I couldn't finish the entire book, although I think I held on for nearly half. The subject matter was just strange (bizarre?) and not very convincing to me. The book sounded a bit desperate -- and really could not maintain my interest.

But I know I'll soon be reading another book by this same author, whom I've enjoyed so many times before.