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Servants and their masters;: A novel download ebook

by Fergus Reid Buckley

Servants and their masters;: A novel download ebook
ISBN:
0385041608
ISBN13:
978-0385041607
Author:
Fergus Reid Buckley
Publisher:
Doubleday; 1st edition (1973)
Language:
Pages:
607 pages
ePUB:
1752 kb
Fb2:
1282 kb
Other formats:
mbr lrf lit mobi
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.2

Servants and their masters; book.

Servants and their masters; book. Had he fallen in love with England, author Fergus Reid Buckley's "Servants and their Masters," might have become a text of reference in matters related to that country's mid-20th century aristocracy. Perhaps the BBC might have picked it up and sorted out a new "Forsythe Saga" series, or an "Upstairs Downstairs. In penning his nine-book, many-hundred-paged epic, Buc highwayscribery knows first-hand how falling in love with that magnificent state of place and mind known as Spain comes at a price.

Buckley, Fergus Reid, 1930-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Author Fergus Reid Buckley is one of the ten children of legendary oil explorer, William F Buckley; this was his second novel.

He can be saved by . in the 1946 prologue.

The Headless Horseman is a novel by Mayne Reid, first published in monthly serialized form during 1865 and 1866, and subsequently published as a book in 1866, based on the author's adventures in the United States. The Headless Horseman" or "A Strange Tale of Texas" was set in Texas and based on a south Texas folk tale. The Headless Horseman is a story about an Irish adventurer and hero in the War with Mexico.

Reid Buckley, founder and head of the Buckley School of Public Speaking, graduated .

Reid Buckley, founder and head of the Buckley School of Public Speaking, graduated from Yale. During the 1960s and 1970s, he toured the United States, taking on liberal columnist Max Lerner. He is the author of the novels The Eye of the Hurricane, and the fiction trilogy Canticle of the Thrush, Servants and Their Masters, as well as several books on speaking and writing. He lives in South Carolina.

Fergus Reid Buckley (July 14, 1930 – April 14, 2014) was an American writer, speaker, and educator. Buckley was the founder of The Buckley School of Public Speaking. Among his books is a history of his family, An American Family-The Buckleys (2008). Buckley was born in Paris, France, where his father worked in the oil industry. In 1952, he graduated from Yale University, where he was a member of Skull and Bones

These are recommendation lists which contains What an Audacious and Sly Servant!. You should give them a visit if you're looking for similar novels to read

These are recommendation lists which contains What an Audacious and Sly Servant!. You should give them a visit if you're looking for similar novels to read. Alternatively, you can also create your own list. Gender Bender/Cross- Dressing Novels. Both of them are precious offspring of their family, the only princess (which is a secret, people thought she is boy except for her family & relatives) from a martial. more arts family and the only prince from the emperial family. MC is calm and always insulting the crown prince on her mind. The crown prince is wary of the MC that she will overtake his beautiful appearance LoL!

An American Family - Reid Buckley. Note to Readers: This work is a memoir. But the Reid who concerns you is Reid the writer.

An American Family - Reid Buckley. It reflects the author’s present recollections of his experiences over a period of years. His 1973 novel Servants and Their Masters, a family saga set in late-Franco Spain, is a considerable work of art. I was a Yale English major, and I know literature when I see it. It’s the only eight hundred-page novel that I’ve read a half-dozen times and hope to read another half-dozen times before I die. It’s a masterpiece. I was reminded of that book as I read this very different one.

Reviews:
  • FLIDER
highwayscribery knows first-hand how falling in love with that magnificent state of place and mind known as Spain comes at a price.

Had he fallen in love with England, author Fergus Reid Buckley's "Servants and Their Masters," might have become a text of reference in matters related to that country's mid-20th century aristocracy.

Perhaps the BBC might have picked it up and sorted out a new "Forsythe Saga" series, or an "Upstairs Downstairs."

In penning his nine-book, many-hundred-paged epic, Buckley learned that, "I don't think you can sell novels chock full of Spanish names to American readers."

Yet.

But clearly, writing "Servants and Their Masters," brought joys to an author who immersed himself in all things Spanish, learned to dance flamenco, and clap the various compas that mark the form's musical time, as preparation.

There are books aplenty about the Spanish Civil War. The horrors, or relative peace, of the Franco era are documented in fiction and nonfiction alike. The vaunted democratic transition is still being written about by those who forged it.

But "Servants and Their Masters," stands practically alone in its English-language rendering of 1960s Spain. A period when the country slouched toward prosperity and into the community of Western democracies in spite of the dictator's longevity.

The tale begins with the unflattering portrait of a softened aristocracy eating, drinking and whoring away its dwindling influence in a Madrid exploding with recent wealth and a newfound rich to exploit it.

Supporting this decadent class are a cast of brigands, victims, guttersnipes, schemers, sex predators, and bordello types rendered ever-so-faithfully, by a gentleman who has seen much in his days.

Says Buckley, "I have never been able to comprehend a character unless I had some fix on that person's parents and kin and the society that person descended from. I view almost everything from a perspective of three generations, when, and only then, the person begins to make sense to me."

As such, "Servants," bounds from the death-rattle of the noble clan under its microscope, to the centuries-old warfare they engaged in their northern homeland of Sacedon, while weaving in the progress of a recent Basque peasant for fine measure.

Almost every character gets (at least) one chapter about themselves, their background, urges and vices, without the exposition ever getting in the way because, given its obvious size, the reader is aware of their commitment to something large and worthwhile. And also because Buckley's scenario grabs from the start while establishing a fever for illumination.

The author is a rambunctious prosodic force, in command of English and possessing a vocabulary both extensive and colorful. Moods change throughout the yarn's meticulous unspooling, sometimes macabre, others satirical, alternately noir-like, journalistic, philosophic, or comical.

In a favorite moment, Buckley resorts to thick and somber strokes in conjuring a poem of the coastal Basque country:

"On clear days, especially in the autumn, when the air seems to have been distilled in crystal goblets, their highest crags are sculpted against the horizon. More often, the crags are shut out; and clouds rolling, rumbling herds press down and nearly snag themselves on the belltower of the church, and often blot out entirely the ruins of the castle. The whole northwestern flank of Spain heaves down to the Cantabrian in a front scalloped by coves and tidal lagoons, great bluffs, studding the coast and forming amphitheatres connected to each and within vast sand beaches stretch like ligaments."

Highlighting that passage exalts the writer, but misrepresents the larger work wherein Buckley's rapier pen renders mordant portraiture of rotten people both high and low on the social ladder.

There are good people, too, but they're for contrast and respite from the psychic and physical slaughter the ugly ones unleash.

"Servants" links the lower class with the highest until a reader begins to forget who hails from which side.

Which is somewhat the point Buckley is trying to make through the glib and insightful narrative recounted by the American businessman C.O. Jones in an ambience that effectively blurs which way is up and which way down.
  • Khiceog
I first read and loved this book when I was about twenty. Now I am almost sixty, and I am rereading it, because over the years I have thought about this book so often--the author has created characters, a story, and a style that are that memorable. It is delightful to discover that Mr. Buckley has written other novels, and I am going to seek them out, too. I feel stupid for not looking for more books from him until now, but at least I have them to look forward to.