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James Lees-Milne: the life download ebook

by Michael BLOCH

James Lees-Milne: the life download ebook
ISBN:
0719565502
ISBN13:
978-0719565502
Author:
Michael BLOCH
Publisher:
John Murray (2010)
Language:
Pages:
416 pages
ePUB:
1877 kb
Fb2:
1353 kb
Other formats:
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Subcategory:
Rating:
4.7

James Lees-Milne – The Life, Michael Bloch, John Murray, 2009, p. 1; see Sources. The Worcestershire grumbler: the writings of James Lees-Milne, diarist and man of letters.

James Lees-Milne – The Life, Michael Bloch, John Murray, 2009, p. James Lees-Milne– The Life, Michael Bloch, John Murray, 2009, p. "Cabinet Office list of honours declined by since deceased persons, 1951–1999" (PDF).

James Lees-Milne was visited on his deathbed by Prince Charles and found it "rather a strain". He travelled there by Eurostar

James Lees-Milne was visited on his deathbed by Prince Charles and found it "rather a strain". He had fallen ill while paying his annual visit to the Paris home of Oswald Mosley's widow, Diana, with her sister, the Duchess of Devonshire. He travelled there by Eurostar

James Lees-Milne (19081997)known to friends as Jimis remembered for his work for the National Trust, rescuing some of. .

James Lees-Milne (19081997)known to friends as Jimis remembered for his work for the National Trust, rescuing some of England's greatest architectural treasures, and for the vivid and entertaining diaries which have earned him a reputation as "the 20th-century Pepys. In this long-awaited biography, Michael Bloch portrays a life rich in contradictions, in which an unassuming youth overtook more dazzling contemporaries to emerge as a leading figure in the fields of conservation and letters.

James Lees-Milne: The Life is an exceptional biography: lively, perceptive and well-written.

James Lees-Milne book. In this long-awaited biography, Michael Bloch portrays a life rich in contradictions, in which an unassuming yout"the James Lees-Milne (1908–1997) - known to friends as Jim - is remembered for his work for the National Trust, rescuing some of England’s greatest architectural treasures, and for the vivid and entertaining diaries which have earned him a reputation as "the.

Michael Bloch was appointed James Lees-Milne’s literary executor in 1997 and is.

Michael Bloch was appointed James Lees-Milne’s literary executor in 1997 and is currently writing his biography. How many people aged ninety (or at any age) can describe a frail elderly person so: " like a feather.

Initially, Lees-Milne is not the easiest of subjects – at Oxford, "he failed to scintillate whether drunk or sober" – but this stalwart of the National Trust went on to enjoy passions with an astonishing gallery of characters, from Robert Byron to John Gielgud.

A bisexual old-Etonian snob, James Lees-Milne was the unlikely 20th-century Samuel Pepys

A bisexual old-Etonian snob, James Lees-Milne was the unlikely 20th-century Samuel Pepys. During his long life (1908-97) he published a pile of books on subjects such as country houses, five earls, a viscount and a duke, as well as several novels about British aristocrats incommoded by foreigners and plebeians. But his lasting literary legacy is his 12 volumes of waspishly funny, beadily observant diaries. Bristling with reactionary sentiments but rivetingly candid and attractively responsive to art and the natural world, they record with gossipy immediacy a curious mind and its milieu.

James Lees-Milne (1908-1997) was a noted expert on the English country house and perhaps the greatest British diarist of the 20th century. James Lees-Milne, Michael Bloch. Funny, indiscreet, candid, touching, and sharply observed, his journals reveal a fascinating personality and hold up a mirror to historical events large and small.

Michael Bloch, James Lees-Milne. Operation Willi: The Nazi Plot to Kidnap the Duke of Windsor, July 1940. Caves of Ice & Midway on the Waves: Diaries, 1946-1949. Closet Queens: Some 20th Century British Politicians. The Duchess of Windsor. The Secret File of the Duke of Windsor.

James Lees-Milne. The Life
Reviews:
  • Whiteseeker
A good bio of a really fascinating man, central to the efforts to keep "great" and not-so-great houses in UK alive via the Nat Trust; he pretty much "invented" the enterprise. I hope the philanthropic and preservationist communities and academies teach Lees-Milne.
  • Manona
I bought this book because I heard Lees-Milne described as one of the great diarists of WWII and after. So far, he is not living up to that billing. He can be very good on other people's habits and characters, but he's less insightful about himself, and sometimes rather whiny. Bloch has made a selection here, and seems (his policies not altogether clear) to have chosen to omit chunks that appeared (somewhat expurgated, apparently) in books Lees-Milne edited in his own lifetime: Ancestral Voices, Prophesying Peace, etc. Those books might have been a better place to start.
  • Leniga
Michael Bloch's excellent biography of James Lees-Milne sorts out the facts from the fantasy in the life of the 20th century's best memoirist, and savior of so many country houses through his work beginning in WW2. I came to James Lees-Milne through his early memoir of life in London during the early years of the Second World War - and found them the most vivid recreation of that time and that place. The biography is a good read for Less-Milne fans but at best its an adjunct to the memoirs - because it lacks both the style and the wit of the man himself - which would pretty hard to do. Where the book fails for me is in sorting out the reasons for Lees-Milne's loyalty towards the fascist members of the Mitford family - childhood friends - yet traitors to England in its darkest days. It is hard to deny that Lees-Milne was a snob and often foolish in his infatuations with men and women - but in his own writings we forgive so much because of the brilliant searchlight he brings to bear upon his life - harder to not judge him when the facts of a life are spread out - even in so sympathetic and skillful a fashion as Mr. Bloch does. I highly recommend this book to anyone who has ever enountered the memoirs -or the books on persons and places that Lees-Milne achieved. I would have preferred more analysis of the weakness in Lees-Milne's moral structure - but I am happy to settle for the life of a man who brought an elusive charm to bear over his life and times, and left behind a priceless record of those times, while saving much of the architectural treasures of the past.
  • GAMER
I encountered the name James Lees-Milne for the first time in a book by Deborah Mitford, a.k.a. the Duchess of Devonshire. How is it that this man, who was a major figure in the preservation of England's stately homes, the biographer of Harold Nicolson, and a friend of Vita Sackville-West, among many other things, had never appeared on my radar screen before? Smoothly written, full of facts, this biography was a thoroughgoing pleasure. My spirits sagged as my bookmark approached the back cover.
  • Goltizuru
This is not a subject I normally read, however James Lees-Milne:The life filled a gap for me.
  • Quamar
I rated this purchase high because it met all my expectations. The book is interesting and well written. The order/receipt process was smooth and the quality of the book was excellent. I usually use my local library for my book needs, however when the library does not buy or cannot obtain via loan the book I want, I order from Amazon. Selection is excellent and prices are affordable. So far all the books I have ordered have met all my expectations.
  • Sarin
An excellent, deep analysis of a fascinating man, of a world long -gone.
I read this book because I enjoyed a volume of condensed diary entries from the WWII years, assembled by the same author. I can't say that I learned anything particularly new or insightful from this biography, much of it is just digesting what Lees-Milne wrote in his diary. There is quite a lot of naming names in his love life, which is maybe interesting in a small way, but not information one would remember. In a broad sense, the book certainly points out how common marriages were between gay men and either straight or lesbian women -- especially high society marriages. If that chunk of the book is removed, as well as his own gay trysts before and after marrying, the portion about his work at the National Trust is pretty small. One other reviewer pointed out that Lees-Milne had a blind spot for the failings of some of his friends, such as the Mitford siblings' pro-Nazi or fascist leanings. I got the sense that Lees-Milne was something of a hanger-on to an upper level of society that he didn't have the income to belong to, and while he sees the grand old families losing their hold on vast properties due to taxation and rising expenses, he obviously wishes for this feudal lifestyle to continue, servants and all. There could have been more comment on how his job with the National Trust contributed to him living above his means. Kind of creepy to read about the splendid dinners he regularly attended at the homes of his wealthy friends during the war. He seems to have had little concern that he was unable to reciprocate, except in a minor way. It makes you wonder what his rich friends said behind his back.

Michael Bloch did a good job in organizing the volumes of the diaries, and I think reading those is better, funnier, and more revealing than this biography.