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The MONKEY AND THE TIGER download ebook

by Robert van Gulik

The MONKEY AND THE TIGER download ebook
ISBN:
0684167360
ISBN13:
978-0684167367
Author:
Robert van Gulik
Publisher:
Scribner Paper Fiction; 3rd Ed. edition (August 1, 1980)
Language:
ePUB:
1544 kb
Fb2:
1725 kb
Other formats:
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Subcategory:
Rating:
4.5

Robert Van Gulik discovered an 18th century Chinese detective novel, and translated it just after World War I. The tiger on the other hand started very dramatically. Dee managed to get trapped on an island with bandits attacking.

Robert Van Gulik discovered an 18th century Chinese detective novel, and translated it just after World War II. The historical person it is base on, Judge Dee, actually existed in about the year 7oo AD-during the Ming Dynasty. It was much more dramatic and a nice change from the This book contained two rather short Judge Dee stories. The first story seemed to be fairly typical, a murder, a troublesome gang, prostitution etc.

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Robert Van Gulik (1910-67) was a Dutch diplomat and an authority on Chinese history and culture

Robert Van Gulik (1910-67) was a Dutch diplomat and an authority on Chinese history and culture. He drew his plots from the whole body of Chinese literature, especially from the popular detective novels that first appeared in the seventeenth century. This particular book is actually two separate novellas of about 70 pages each: (1) "The Morning of the Monkey" taking place in 666 (there's a hair raising date for you!) in Judge Dee's own district-he is involved by a Gibbon (actually a type of ape and not a monkey-but close enough for fiction, poetic license and all) carrying a.

The Monkey and the Tiger book pairs two unrelated short gong'an detective novels written by Robert van Gulik and set in Imperial China (roughly speaking the Tang Dynasty). Both stories are fictions based on the real character of Judge Dee (Ti Jen-chieh or Di Renjie), a magistrate and statesman of the Tang court, who lived roughly 630–700. The book contains eight illustrations and a map, all by the author.

This book is part of Van Gulik's unique series of Judge Dee novels which chronicle the cases investigated by the famous magistrate of classical Chinese detective stories

This book is part of Van Gulik's unique series of Judge Dee novels which chronicle the cases investigated by the famous magistrate of classical Chinese detective stories. A staple of the Judge Dee stories are the multi-layered plot and accurate historical details of ancient Chinese culture and practices and this book does not disappoint in both areas. In this chapter of the series, Judge Dee is assigned to the city of Canton to investigate the disappearance and subsequent murder of a Chinese noble.

Two stories, "The Morning of the Monkey" and "The Night of the Tiger," mysteries resolved by Judge Dee .

Two stories, "The Morning of the Monkey" and "The Night of the Tiger," mysteries resolved by Judge Dee involving theft, banditry and murder. Newest Oldest Longest Shortest Random. T. The Classical Guitar Corner Podcast.

The morning of the monkey - The night of the tiger. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on July 25, 2013.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. carousel previous carousel next. The Emperor's Pearl: A Judge Dee Mystery.

Books related to The Monkey and The Tiger. The Ingenious Judge Dee. Hock G. Tjoa.

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Reviews:
  • Akirg
Dutch diplomat and sinologist Robert Hans van Gulik (1910-67) apparently wrote 16 fiction and 1 translation of the exploits of historical Judge Dee (630-700). He includes a short "Postcript" at the end of all the ones I've read--which you might read first--especially if you haven't read any of them before. He also includes several woodcut type drawings which (while not historically accurate) IMHO greatly enhance these volumes and a "Dramatis Personae" list--especially valuable since its divided up by the case (most of these books involve simultaneous/multiple cases.

This particular book is actually two separate novellas of about 70 pages each:
(1) "The Morning of the Monkey" taking place in 666 (there's a hair raising date for you!) in Judge Dee's own district--he is involved by a Gibbon (actually a type of ape and not a monkey--but close enough for fiction, poetic license and all) carrying a gold ring with entwined dragons. This leads the good judge on a fun, interesting, and challenging adventure--with his usual panache and flashes of insight.

(2) "The Night of the Tiger" takes place in 676 & pits the new Lord Chief Justice of the Empire and President of the Metropolitan Court (i.e. Judge Dee, promoted after "The Chinese Nail Murders," once again travelling, & born in the Year of the Tiger) without his strong entourage against the Flying Tigers--a gang of cut-throats. Admittedly, his separation from his guards is a bit far-fetched--it seems a bit arrogant to me--maybe because of his promotion? Of course, these bandits have no relation to the WWII Flying Tigers who actually flew planes. Interestingly, the Judge seems quite complacent despite the apparently dire situation. He does, however, as usual, figure out whodunnit--even when there isn't an apparent crime and also figures out a unique, clever, and IMHO satisfying way out of the dilemma of the Tigers.

Overall, as usual, the tales/cases are very enjoyable and delightful IMHO--especially for readers more interested in straight mystery vs. action/adventure/thriller. If you enjoy the Golden Age of Mysteries (e.g. Sayers, Christie, Marsh, Allingham, Tey), you will probably greatly enjoy the van Gulik books; I plan to read them all--with some now on order at Amazon. The Judge Dee books IMHO are more mystery oriented with less social commentary, flowery description, political intrigue, and physical action than many "mysteries" esp. contemporary ones--but do provide cultural insights--perhaps why I like them better.

If you are interested primarily in Oriental mysteries, you might read Ingrid J. (I.J.) Parker's ~11th century Japan Sugawara Akitada mysteries, Laura Joh Rowland's ~18th c. Japan Sano Ichiro mysteries, and/or James Melville's more contemporary Japan Superintendant Otani mysteries.

The 18 Judge Dee books I've found are (in alphabetical order, ignoring "the"): Celebrated Cases of Judge Dee (this one's a translation), The Chinese Bell Murders, The Chinese Gold Murders, The Chinese Lake Murders, The Chinese Maze Murders, The Chinese Nail Murders, The Emperor's Pearl, The Haunted Monastery, Judge Dee at Work, The Lacquer Screen, The Monkey & the Tiger, Murder in Canton, Murder in Ancient China (I've heard this is a sub-set of Judge Dee at Work), Necklace & Calabash, The Phantom of the Temple, Poets & Murder, The Red Pavilion, and The Willow Pattern. So, there are 18 books but one is redundant, one is a translation, and the other 16 are fictional works by van Gulik.
  • Zugar
The stories are clever, full of excitement, almost as long as novellas, and as satisfying in their way as the novels. In the first story, Judge Dee is enjoying a cool summer morning, in the second we meet him huddled in his fur coat riding away from a posting in the frozen north.

THE MORNING OF THE MONKEY
Van Guilik dedicated this story to the memory of his good friend, the gibbon Bubu. All his life Van Guilik kept these little monkeys as pets and even learned to chant their songs - perhaps the most exotic manifestation of his great talents as a linguist. So this story must have possessed a special charm for the author, as it did for me. It's a crafty gibbon that gets Judge Dee started on an investigation of a murdered vagabond. The victim turns out to be a deliciously eccentric character, and his murder, by a convoluted route, helps Dee crack an even bigger case.

THE NIGHT OF THE TIGER
This story is nicely spiced with Chinese astrological lore. Judge Dee was born under the sign of the tiger (in 630 A.D.). He wonders if perhaps the mystic influence of this animal of the zodiac is what brought him into one of the most dangerous adventures of his life. During a raging flood he takes refuge in an isolated house that's about to be attacked by gang of desperate robbers - the Flying Tigers. How Judge Dee uncovers and solves a murder, while outwitting the robbers, is the subject of this tense story. As a bonus, there's a ghostly apparition in the plot!

This University of Chicago edition includes a postscript by Van Guilik about the judge and Chinese culture, as well as Van Guilik's original sketches of pivotal scenes, drawn in the Chinese style.
  • Malalanim
I am a big fan of all the Judge Dee mysteries, which I luckily discovered in the 1980s and am in the process of re-reading. Most Judge Dee books offer a trio of intertwining mysteries occurring in 7th century China, and gives readers a glimpse into that time period's criminal detection, justice and day-to-day life through the experiences of Judge Dee. The Monkey and The Tiger has two cases for Dee to solve.
  • Doomblade
An excellent series
  • Gosar
i am biased because i have enjoyed robert van gulik's judge dee mysteries for decades. he captures ancient china and manages to translate the times in terms that we can understand. i own the full set and also most of the books available on kindle because it is perfect for travel reading as well.
  • Qutalan
I first read one of the Judge Dee mysteries when I was in high school and remembered how much I liked them so I was very happy that I could find all of them on Amazon since they had gone out of print. I spent many enjoyable hours reading all of them.
  • Tekasa
What a delight it has been to find this mystery novelists. The books are about a real magistrate in China with the most amazing gift for finding the culprit. While the books are novels the cases are not.
Underrated mystery writer.