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Blink of an Eye download ebook

by Gregg Luke

Blink of an Eye download ebook
ISBN:
1608610268
ISBN13:
978-1608610266
Author:
Gregg Luke
Publisher:
Covenant Communications Inc.; 1st edition (July 1, 2010)
Language:
Pages:
293 pages
ePUB:
1713 kb
Fb2:
1470 kb
Other formats:
rtf doc lit lrf
Subcategory:
Rating:
4.3

I enjoyed this book much more than the last Gregg Luke novel I read. This one has very compelling characters and storyline.

Childhood was a happy, carefree time for Joseph Ramirez  . I enjoyed this book much more than the last Gregg Luke novel I read. I feel that when the author is able to make me actually feel an emotion towards the characters then they have done their job well.

I love his style of writing. He brings the characters to life with their different dialects.

Ships from and sold by braineybooks2. I love his style of writing. you can almost hear it! Gregg is also a master of suspense, unravelling the story as you go. But most of all I love how action-packed his books are! They keep me on the edge of my seat, and make it hard to take a break. Bloodborne is one of his best! Action and excitement from the very first page.

I’m not certain which genre to place it in. It’s clearly psychological drama, but it’s also a mystery with strong social issue leanings, and there’s a hint of romance. Whatever anyone wants to call it, it’s a tremendous and powerful story.

Gregg Luke masterfully employs contemporary hypnotherapy to uncover a devastating past in the psychologically gripping novel. The text says this couple is from Aalborg, Jutland, Denmark. Intense and very moving. Clinical Psychologist. A tremendous and powerful story. Jennie Hansen, Merdian Magazine. I notice however that the transcription of their accents seems German or Dutch, and their parting words are tot ziens which I believe is Dutch. Is it common for Danish persons of that region to also speak Dutch, or is this an anomaly? greggluke1.

Select Format: Paperback. ISBN13:9781608610266.

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This book is sold subject to the condition that it shall not, by way of trade or otherwise, be lent, re-sold, hired out or otherwise circulated in any form of binding or cover other than that in which it is published and without a similar condition including this condition being imposed on the subsequent purchaser. ISBN 978-1-78033-567-4 (hardback).

Childhood was a happy, carefree time for Joseph Ramirez. At least that's how he remembered. it. But after a near-fatal traffic accident leaves him with a crushed skull, he's not so sure. Along with physical pain, Joseph now suffers recurring nightmares. And each night the heart-wrenching dreams grow increasingly vivid and graphic, to the point that he often cries out in anguish and remorse, revealing horrifying secrets kept hidden for twenty years. To complicate matters, a ruthless lawyer is challenging Joseph's innocence in the traffic accident. When defense attorney Michelle Haas comes to his aid, they discover they knew each other as children, and soon another forgotten experience comes into play, one that goes deeper than simple friendship. Together they struggle to answer Joseph's unanswerable questions. Are Joseph's night terrors actually repressed memories? Can his psychiatrist unravel the mystery behind his nightmares, including his hospital roommate's claim that Joseph has confessed to murder? As the clock ticks down, Joseph realizes there is only one way to uncover the truth about his family and himself, reliving a past he has unknowingly worked all his life to forget.
Reviews:
  • Nalmetus
Very good, very interesting. I truly enjoyed reading this book. Kept my attention well and I Ioved learning about repressed memories. Well written. I chuckled a bit when the author called the language of Denmark "Dutch.". It's actually 'Danish.' Also, when I lived there I never heard a last name like the one used for the Danish couple. Their last names are very simple, Like Jensen and Andersen. Even with those errors, I found this book one of the best I've ever read.
  • MilsoN
good book
  • Cargahibe
Really loved it!
  • Alsanadar
This is the first novel I have ever read by Gregg Luke and I have to admit I was impressed. Blink of an Eye is a medical/ psychological thriller that looks at the impact of traumatic brain injury on one man's life. Joseph Ramirez leads an ordinary quiet life as a school teacher when he is involved in a car accident that alters his memory forever. Soon bits and pieces of his childhood begin into come back dreams and he learns that it was anything but ideal.

Gregg Luke unravels the page turning plot little by little in short well written chapters that leave you wanting to know more. The detail is incredible and I found the methods used by the psychologist sound and accurate. A lot of research and hard work went into describing the process of hypnotherapy and regression used by the psychiatrist working on Joseph's case. Blink of An Eye is not for the faint of heart as it describes the abuse Joseph and his family were forced to endure. It tells a gripping story that could very well be many people's reality who deal with domestic violence and child abuse daily in their homes. This is a hard one to put down once you have started. You'll want to know exactly what did or did not happen to Joseph and what secrets lay in his past.

It's one I likely will never forget since it brings to light many of the issues I worked with as a child protective service worker and domestic violence victim's advocate. It's a book that leaves an impression. To learn more about the author visit his website at [...]
  • Jode
What would happen if you were seriously injured in an auto accident, remained unconscious for several days, then woke up to nightmares, disturbing nightmares concerning a past life you never knew existed?

Blink of an Eye is a riveting medical thriller filled with mystery and the details that only a medical expert would know. Gregg Luke is a clinical pharmacist by day and prolific author by night, by weekend, by lunch hour or some other times that he manages to squeeze in quality writing time.

Luke's protagonist, Joseph Ramirez, is a likeable, church-going guy who thinks he's lead an ordinary life and is pretty easy to understand. As the book progresses, Joseph, or Jose, as his mother insists on calling him, discovers that someone much different is lurking inside.
  • Darksinger
Gregg obviously knows his stuff when it comes to the medical end of things and wrote a convincing medical thriller about a young man haunted by memories (or lack thereof) from his past. The book captivated me and held my interest and I finished it in a day and a half. I am even going to heed the subtle medical advice from the Nazi physical therapist not to just take a pill and expect my old bones to strengthen themselves when what I really need to be doing is pursuing a more active lifestyle.

His main character was a likeable sort, a young Hispanic science teacher with a now-absent abusive father and an overbearing Latin mother trying to marry him off. (I pictured Marie Barone from Everybody Loves Raymond more than once.) While his medical knowledge was evident on every page, however, I felt that his knowledge of all things legal fell a bit short. The two lawyers were a little too stereotypical. I would have liked to see the shark lawyer who accosts a man recovering from a major accident in the hospital with a quick and dirty settlement deal show a little humanity as he perhaps did more discovery on the case and realized the abuse this man had experienced as a child. Conversely, I felt that Joseph's female attorney was a little too good to be true on the other end of the spectrum. "I know I usually just work for the school board doing contractual things, but I was able to get you a three million dollar settlement in an amazingly short amount of time, and I don't want a penny." In what universe? Or is that because she flipped to the end of the book and knows they will hook up? If so, can you say "conflict of interest?" And of course, the legal stuff wrapped up a little too quickly and neatly for my taste, probably because I've experienced the legal process at work. But that is, I suppose, part of suspending reality, because you can't put the book on hold for a couple of years waiting for the court date and the legal process to progress. My biggest complaint with most novels is when there is a departure from reality. I guess I'm not an escapist at heart.

I say all of the above somewhat tongue in cheek, however, as I realize that an attorney in my recent novel did some decidedly un-attorneylike things, based on his feelings for a client. Other than these nitpicky things that I feel compelled to point out so that people will know that I am able to articulate a thoughtful critique and that I am not just sucking up to a fellow author, I found it a good read by a talented writer. It also lead to some interesting discussions with my husband, who is a licensed family therapist, about therapy to uncover past memories.

The story might be a little dark for those expecting a little more religious content from an LDS author. Gregg's character is LDS, but his religion is understated and there in the background as a quiet reason for his moral choices. That is not altogether a bad thing, as many books by LDS authors are a little "too Mormon" for the average non-LDS reader. Overall, it was an enjoyable book that held my attention.
  • Jorad
Blink of an Eye is about a teacher, Joseph Ramirez, who was in a near fatal car accident. Gregg Luke opened the book in a way to capture readers. He started it out with the car accident Joseph was in and described it extremely well. Although this was a fictional book, Gregg's understanding of how the medical world and the law world work made this book believable. At first Joseph didn't appeal to me but as I got deeper in the book he became realistic as if this event had actually happened and made the book very interesting to me as he overcomes the struggles of the accident. It was a good book and kept me wanting to read through the entire book but it seemed a little dragged in some parts and rushed in others especially near the end.