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The Fall of Saigon: Scenes from the Sudden End of a Long War download ebook

The Fall of Saigon: Scenes from the Sudden End of a Long War download ebook
ISBN:
0722121067
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1181 kb
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1466 kb
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Rating:
4.5

The Fall Of Saigon book. The story of the final months of the Vietnam War told through the experiences of some thirty people caught up in the crisis of those days. 510 pages; 32 pages of b&w photos plus maps; . x . inches.

The Fall Of Saigon book.

Vietnam War, 1961-1975, Vietnam Saigon Occupation by Communist military forces, 1975 - Personal observations. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by AltheaB on June 24, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

The Fall of Saigon: Scenes from the Sudden End of a Long War Hardcover. The book is mostly about the political circumstances surrounding the fall of Saigon (and political events well before April 1975). Last Men Out: The True Story of America's Heroic Final Hours in Vietnam Paperback. If you're interested in the military and social aspect of the defeat (as I was), this probably won't be for you. Very dry reading.

The Fall of Saigon is not an easy book to read. We are forced to confront the final conclusion of our failed crusade. Our goal was the minds and the hearts but we ended up fragmented the lives of the people we were suppose to help

The Fall of Saigon is not an easy book to read. Our goal was the minds and the hearts but we ended up fragmented the lives of the people we were suppose to help. When one considers the sacrifices made by both countries in treasure and lives the facts concerning the events of April-May 1975 are hard to digest, even after 30 plus years. No judgments are made here, no accusing fingers are pointed; we must read, and ponder.

book by David Butler. A noted journalist draws on his firsthand impressions and experiences to interweave the lives of thirty men and women, both American and Vietnamese, who became caught up in the climactic fall of Saigon in April 1975.

THE FALL OF SAIGON Scenes From the Sudden End of a Long Wa. FOR those of us in Saigon on April 29, 1975, our day began at 4 .

THE FALL OF SAIGON Scenes From the Sudden End of a Long War. By David Butler. with a North Vietnamese artillery and rocket barrage against Tan Son Nhut Airport and ended ignominiously with our flight by helicopter to Navy ships in the South China Sea. In a span of hours, America had lost its first war. When I clambered into a United States Air Force CH-46 helicopter that afternoon, I felt a mixture of relief, exhaustion, fear (not long before, I had seen a South Vietnamese plane shot down by a Communist heat-seeking missile, a bad omen) and anger.

The US officers managing the evacuation had to make agonising choices

The US officers managing the evacuation had to make agonising choices. This was a promise they could not keep.

Saigon's fall and the taking of the presidential palace, on April 30, 1975. time and time again that they could hold on to most of the country as long as they were there. Francoise De Mulder-Roger Viollet/Getty Images. Only 28 months before the end, President Nixon had announced that the war’s end would come with peace with honor, and promised to respond vigorously to any North Vietnamese violations of the peace agreement. But Congress had insisted upon a final end to military action in Southeast Asia in the summer of 1973, and Watergate had driven Nixon out of office a year later.

The event marked the end of the Vietnam War and the start of a transition period to the formal reunification of Vietnam into the Socialist Republic of Vietnam.

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Reviews:
  • Gadar
A great report of the final days of South Viet Nam. I read the paperback when it came out, several times. My copy of the paperback wore out---then finding a hardcover copy on the cheap was a great find. While this may not be the "authoritative" book on the topic, readers do get an understanding of the events from a local Vietnamese, Missionary, Foreign Service, military, political, press, and personal view of the events as they unfolded. Worth the price.
  • Tygrarad
A good account of a terrible history. Book was as advertised. I would buy again from this vendor.
  • Eigeni
Its ok.
  • Bort
I've read several books about the fall of Vietnam in 1975 and the evacuation of the Americans and Vietnamese from the doomed country. "Decent Interval" by Frank Snepp is excellent. Snepp sees the events as an Embassy insider -- and one of his purposes is to excoriate the U.S. government -- and Ambassador Graham Martin -- for its failure to evacuate Vietnamese allies. Compared to "Decent Interval," "The Fall of Saigon" has a broader vision and the perspective is perhaps more balanced as it comes 10 years after the event, allowing time for reflection.

Butler begins the book with the attack of the North Vietnamese army in the Central Highlands on March 6, 1975. He ends it with the evacuation of the American Embassy in Saigon and the surrender of the South Vietnamese government on April 30. The evacuation of Saigon was one of the darkest -- but most dramatic -- events of American history. There are heroes aplenty here, especially young diplomats at the Embassy who took enormous chances to help Vietnamese friends and colleagues escape from the advancing communist army. One has to admire the inexperienced Marines who did so well in protecting the Embassy and Americans during those last days. Butler also gives attention to Vietnamese on both sides of the war although the book focuses mostly on the Americans.

Butler was a journalist in Saigon during those last days and the the great majority of the book is compiled from interviews the author had with the American and South and North Vietnamese participants and eye witnesses, including his own experiences. We are treated to some unique stories, for example, to the saga of a missionary couple cut off in the Central Highlands. Most of the book is devoted to an account of the last days of of the U.S. government's presence in Saigon. This story is complex, involving many characters and shifting of scenes. Good maps and photos illustrate the story and Butler's writing is clear, concise, and compelling.

Smallchief
  • Still In Mind
This book documents the last few chaotic weeks of the US presents in Vietnam. The human story is effectively conveyed by first hand accounts of eyewitnesses from many strata of Vietnam society. The author, an NBC reporter in Saigon, witnessed these events firsthand. His unique perspective and access to the diplomatic corps adds a fascinating credibility to the book. His discussion concerning the actions and statements of Ambassador Graham Martin particularly intrigued me. Did Martin's decisions during that period contribute to the frantic last minute evacuation that left many friendlies stranded? The author makes no judgments. Butler includes transcript of many diplomatic cables to and from Martin and Secretary of State Kissinger and the White House concerning events and plans for evacuation and rescue. Reading these transcripts today still convevs a strong emotional impact for this reader. Interspacing these high level discussions are the stories of a whole society turned upside down while "we" skipped town.

The Fall of Saigon is not an easy book to read. We are forced to confront the final conclusion of our failed crusade. Our goal was the minds and the hearts but we ended up fragmented the lives of the people we were suppose to help. When one considers the sacrifices made by both countries in treasure and lives the facts concerning the events of April-May 1975 are hard to digest, even after 30 plus years. No judgments are made here, no accusing fingers are pointed; we must read, and ponder.